Undergraduate Courses in French and Italian

Refer to the Academic Building Code Directory to understand room codes.

The Department does not allow auditing of 100 or 200-level language courses, nor of the F491-492 graduate language proficiency sequence. Exceptions may be made for full-time IU faculty and staff.



Summer 2016

First Six-Week Session
Tuesday, May 10–Friday, June 17

FRIT F100: Elementary French I (4 cr.)

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructorNotes
*2602MTWR12:40-2:10BH 317Noelle LindstromOnline meetings either MW 9:30-10:45
or MW 6:00-7:15
7302 Online courseAlisha ReavesOnline meetings either MW 9:30-10:45
or MW 6:00-7:15

*This class has been canceled (F100 #2602)

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Introduction to French language and selected aspects of French civilization and culture. Credit given for only one of F100, F115, or F491.

FRIT F200: Second-Year French I: Language and Culture (3 cr.)

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
2603MTWRF11:00-12:15BH 319Flavien Falantin

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: F150 or equivalent. Grammar, composition, conversation coordinated with the study of cultural texts. Credit given for only one of the following third-semester courses: F200, or F265.

FRIT F250: Second-Year French II: Language and Culture (3 cr.)

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
2604MTWRF12:45-2:00BH 319Jessica Tindira

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: F200 or equivalent. Grammar, composition, conversation coordinated with the study of cultural texts. Credit given for only one of the following fourth-semester courses: F250, or F265.

FRIT X490: Individual Readings in French (1-3 cr.)

NumberDay/TimeInstructor
2610Arrangedvariable

Independent study on a specific topic not taught in one of the department's regular courses. If interested, complete the permission form and bring it to the office area in GISB 3169.

FRIT F491: Elementary French for Graduate Students (3 cr.)

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
2606MTWRF11:00-12:15BH 305Kelly Kasper-Cushman

Although this course is designed for graduate students who seek to develop reading knowledge of French, it is also open to undergraduate students. However, it will not count toward the French major or minor, and it will not count toward fulfilling the undergraduate language requirement. The course provides an introduction to structures of the language necessary for reading, followed by reading in graded texts of a general nature. Credit given for only one of F491 or any French course at the 100-level.

FRIT M100: Elementary Italian I (4 cr.)

NumberInstructorNotesTime
6938Leonardo CabriniOnline courseOnline meetings either MW 9:30-10:45
or MW 6-7:15
7505Letizia MontroniOnline courseOnline meetings either TR 9:30-10:45
or TR 6-7:15

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Introduction to contemporary Italian language, geography, and culture. Involves a broad variety of assignments and activities that develop grammatical competency and proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Cultural topics and simple cultural comparisons are introduced. Credit given for only one of the following: M100, M110, M115, or M491.

This beginning Italian course is interactive and conducted completely online. The students do not need to be on campus in order to participate. It requires students to work independently and follow a very structured syllabus. The students are involved in a variety of online tasks such as reading, listening, completing exercises, posting writing assignments and recording responses. All the activities are integrated into a larger cultural context. The grammar focuses on present and simple past tense, allowing the students to speak and write in simple sentences about familiar topics with accuracy and fluency, employing basic conversational strategies.

FRIT M200: Intermediate Italian I (3 cr.)

NumberInstructorNotesTime
7176Lisa DolasinskiOnline courseOnline meetings either TR 9:30-10:45
or TR 6-7:15

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: M110, M115, M150, or equivalent.

This intermediate Italian course is interactive and conducted completely online. The students concentrate on reviewing and refining structures learned at the 100-level, but this time at an intermediate level. During the semester students are involved in a variety of tasks practicing speaking, writing, listening and reading in cultural context. The course features study of original Italian short movies that offer the first stimulus for learning intermediate-level vocabulary, grammar and culture. Credit given for only one of M200 or M215.

FRIT X493: Individual Readings in Italian Literature (1-3 cr.)

NumberDay/TimeInstructor
2616Arrangedvariable

Independent study on a specific topic not taught in one of the department's regular courses. If interested, complete the permission form.

Second Six-Week Session
Monday, June 20–Friday, July 29

FRIT F150: Elementary French II: Language and Culture (4 cr.)

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
*7303MTWR12:40-2:10BH 208Carly Bahler
13898onlineOnline meetings either MW 9:30-10:45
or MW 6-7:15
Jamie Root

*This class has been canceled (F150 #7303)

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: F100. Basic structures of the French language and selected topics of French civilization and culture. Credit given for only one of the following: F115, F150, or F491.

FRIT F250: Second-Year French II: Language and Culture (3 cr.)

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
2605MTWRF12:45-2:00BH 206Loic Lerme

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: F200 or equivalent. Grammar, composition, conversation coordinated with the study of cultural texts. Credit given for only one of the following fourth-semester courses: F250, or F265.

FRIT X490: Individual Readings in French (1-3 cr.)

NumberDay/Time
2611Arranged

Independent study on a specific topic not taught in one of the department's regular courses. If interested, complete the permission form and bring it to the office area in GISB 3169.

FRIT F492: Reading French for Graduate Students (3 cr.)

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
2608MTWRF11:00-12:15BH 319C. Scott Cawthon

Prerequisite: F491 or consent of department. Although this course is designed for graduate students who seek to develop reading knowledge of French, it is also open to undergraduate students. However, it will not count toward the French major or minor, and it will not count toward fulfilling the undergraduate language requirement. The course includes a continuation of language and reading development from F491.

FRIT M150: Elementary Italian II (4 cr.)

NumberInstructorNotesTime
7175Lino MioniOnline course Online meetings either TR 9:30-10:45
or TR 6-7:15

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: M100.

Continued introduction to contemporary Italian language, geography, and culture. Involves a broad variety of assignments and activities that build grammatical competency and proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Practice with new cultural topics and basic cultural analysis. Credit given for only one of the following: M110, M115, M150, or M491.

This second-semester Italian course is interactive and conducted completely online. The students do not need to be on campus in order to participate. It requires students to work independently and follow a very structured syllabus. The students are involved in a variety of online tasks such as reading, listening, completing exercises, posting writing assignments and recording responses. All the activities are integrated into a larger cultural context. The grammar focuses on past and future tense, allowing the students to speak and write in simple sentences about familiar topics with accuracy and fluency.

FRIT M250: Intermediate Italian II (3 cr.)

NumberInstructorNotesTime
7177Pietro TripanoOnline courseOnline meetings either TR 9:30-10:45
or TR 6-7:15

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: M200 or equivalent.

This second-year Italian course is conducted entirely online and builds upon the first three semesters of beginning and intermediate Italian (or equivalent). In M250, students concentrate on learning how to express their ideas and debate the pros and cons of certain situations as well as to offer advice and express opinions on a variety of familiar subjects, all in the Italian language. The students are involved in a variety of tasks practicing speaking, writing, listening and reading in a cultural context. The course includes study of original Italian short movies that offer the first stimulus for learning intermediate-level vocabulary, grammar and culture.

FRIT X493: Individual Readings in Italian Literature (1-3 cr.)

NumberDay/TimeInstructor
2617Arrangedvariable

Independent study on a specific topic not taught in one of the department's regular courses. If interested, complete the permission form.



French Courses

FRIT F100: Elementary French I (4 cr.)

Monday, Wednesday, Friday

Number Days Time Room Instructor Notes
3823 MWF 9:05-9:55 GA 0009 Kathryn Bastin Hybrid
3829 MWF 10:10-11:00 GA 0009 Kathryn Bastin Hybrid
3822 MWF 11:15-12:05 WH 106 Jeffrey Long Hybrid
3824 MWF 11:15-12:05 FQ 012B Alana Duncan Hybrid
3826 MWF 12:20-1:10 BH 307 Scott Evans Hybrid
3827 MWF 1:25-2:15 SB 220 Noëlle Lindstrom Hybrid
3828 MWF 1:25-2:15 SY 212 Jeffrey Long Hybrid
3830 MWF 2:30-3:20 WH 104 Scott Evans Hybrid

Monday, Wednesday, Thursday

Number Days Time Room Instructor Notes
3820 MWR 8:00-8:50 BH 333 Yuanshuai Cui Hybrid
3831 MWR 4:40-5:30 SY 006 Noëlle Lindstrom Hybrid

Tuesday, Thursday

Number Days Time Room Instructor Notes
3821 TR 7:15-8:45 BH 322 Rishani Merinnage De Costa Traditional

Online Class

Number Instructor Notes
*3825 canceled Online meetings Tues. 11:15-12:30
or 7:15-8:30 pm

*This class has been canceled (F100 #3825 online class)

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Introduction to French language and selected aspects of French civilization and culture. Credit given for only one of F100, F115, or F491. See our online and hybrid courses page for more information about teaching and learning methods.

FRIT F115: Accelerated Elementary French (4 cr.)

Number Days Time Room Instructor
3832 MTWR 10:10-11:00 GA 0013 Amanda Vredenburgh

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: Obtain authorization from department.

An accelerated treatment of material covered in both F100 and F150 designed for superior students and students with previous training in another foreign language. Credit given for only one of F115 and F100; Credit given for only one of F115 and F150. If interested, please fill out the online authorization form.

FRIT F150: Elementary French II: Language and Culture (4 cr.) GenEd World Languages

Monday, Wednesday, Friday

Number Days Time Room Instructor Notes
3834 MWF 9:05-9:55 BH 246 Cristina Robu hybrid
3837 MWF 10:10-11:00 BH 247 Amber Panwitz hybrid
3835 MWF 11:15-12:05 BH 246 Cristina Robu hybrid
3838 MWF 1:25-2:15 BH 134 Marcel Tchatchou hybrid
3839 MWF 1:25-2:15 GA 0013 Amber Panwitz hybrid
3836 MWF 2:30-3:20 BH 237 Marcel Tchatchou hybrid

Monday, Wednesday, Thursday

Number Days Time Room Instructor Notes
3833 MWR 8:00-8:50 BH 238 Leila El-Murr Hybrid

Tuesday, Thursday

Number Days Time Room Instructor Notes
3841 TR 7:15-8:45 BH 337 Manali Allen Traditional

Online Class

Number Instructor Notes
3840 Amber Panwitz Online meetings Thurs. 11:15-12:30
or 7:15-8:30 pm

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: F100.

Basic structures of the French language and selected topics of French civilization and culture. Credit given for only one of the following: F115, F150, or F491. See our online and hybrid courses page for more information about teaching and learning methods.

FRIT F152: Beginning French Conversation II (1 cr.)

Number Day/Time Instructor
12685 Arranged Kelly Sax

Corequisite: F150.

This companion course to F150 gives beginning students the opportunity to practice conversational French in a relaxed setting with peers. Led by advanced students of French working under faculty guidance, group activities may include discussion, games, magazine/newspaper/movie discussions, cultural events, cooking, etc. S/F grading. No credit for French major.

FRIT F200: Second-Year French I: Language and Culture (3 cr.)

Monday, Wednesday, Friday

Number Days Time Room Instructor
3843 MWF 9:05-9:55 BH 011 Charlène Gilbert
3845 MWF 10:10-11:00 BH 246 Charlène Gilbert
3844 MWF 11:15-12:05 SY 212 Kate Bastin
3846 MWF 12:20-1:10 BH 238 Jessica Tindira
3847 MWF 1:25-2:15 BH 307 Jake Ladyga
3849 MWF 2:30-3:20 BH 229 Jessica Tindira
3850 MWF 2:30-3:20 BH 333 Jake Ladyga

Monday, Wednesday, Thursday

Number Days Time Room Instructor
3848 MWR 4:40-5:30 GA 1100 Flavien Falantin

Evenings

Number Days Time Room Instructor
3851 MW 7:15-8:30 GA 0009 Martin Maillot
3852 TR 7:15-8:30 GA 0005 Martin Maillot

Online

Number Instructor Notes
3842 Kelly Sax Online meetings T 11:15-12:30
or 7:15-8:30 pm

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: F150 or equivalent.

Grammar, composition, conversation coordinated with the study of cultural texts. Credit given for only one of the following third-semester courses: F200 or F265. See our online and hybrid courses page for more information about teaching and learning methods.

FRIT F202: Intermediate French Conversation I (1 cr.)

Number Day/Time Instructor
12689 Arranged Kelly Sax

Corequisite: F200.

This companion course to F200 gives intermediate students the opportunity to practice conversational French in a relaxed setting with peers. Led by advanced students of French working under faculty guidance, group activities may include discussion, games, magazine/newspaper/movie discussions, cultural events, cooking, etc. S/F grading. No credit for French major.

*FRIT F222: Media Studies in the Francophone World (3 cr.)

*This class has been changed to a second 8 week class (F222 #36344)

Number Days Time Room Instructor
30932 (canceled)
36344 (2nd 8 weeks)
MW 4:00-6:30 SB 231
(Student Building)
Vincent Bouchard

This class provides COLL A&H, COLL Global Civ & Culture, and GenEd World Cultures credits.

Description: What did McLuhan (famous for his “the medium is the message”) mean when he spoke of “media as extensions of ourselves”? How are human activities such as speaking, walking, texting, or dancing a prelude to Mass Media (such as printing, filming, recording, broadcasting, etc.)? In this class we will examine our complex relationship with Mass Media (Journals, Magazines, Film, Radio, Television) and question their convergence at a Digital Age. We will focus on three cultural clashes: the introduction of literacy at the end of the Middle Age in Europe; the presence of audio-visual media in 20th c. Africa; and the uses of digital media in contemporary North America.


Objectives: This course will encourage students to develop their cultural, historical and geographical knowledge of the French-speaking world, their understanding of media configurations, and their academic research skills. This course will thus lead students to question their relationship to 'new' media by providing alternative historical and cultural benchmarks. This course will also be an opportunity to learn how to synthesize examples and how to develop a coherent argument, based on a specific focus (question, thesis, hypothesis) – a skill applicable to all scholarly spheres, and beyond.

Taught in English

Click here for full description

FRIT F227: French Style: Food, Fashion and Flair (3 cr.)
The Flavors of French Culture

Number Days Time Room Instructor
32373 TR 2:30-3:45 BH 134 Kelly Sax

This class provides COLL A&H, COLL Global Civ & Culture, and GenEd A&H credits

How and when did everything French become “chic”? Why have other cultures long considered the French culinary authorities in the world? What is the art of French cooking? What explains the French paradox (the average French person consumes more animal and saturated fat than the average American, but has significantly lower rates of cardiovascular disease and obesity than said American)? What is the secret of French fashion? Which French designers have been most influential? What is the relationship between French food, fashion and French society? What does the study of French food and fashion teach us about ourselves?

Through the lens of French food, fashion, and general savoir faire, by way of textual descriptions, film, and experiential learning, we will inhabit the 17th century France of Louis XIV, meet some of the most important culinary and fashion movers and shakers across history, travel through modern-day France to discover its striking geographical variation, learn the meaning of terroir and its impact on food and wine--among other forms of cultural expression-- to come to a more global comparative understanding of the way in food and fashion are intertwined with society and ourselves as individuals.

Taught in English

FRIT F250: Second-Year French II: Language and Culture (3 cr.)

Monday, Wednesday, Friday

Number Days Time Room Instructor
3854 MWF 9:05-9:55 BH 206 Jill Owen
3855 MWF 10:10-11:00 SB 138 Mark Black
13572 MWF 10:10-11:00 BH 005 Jill Owen
3856 MWF 12:20-1:10 BH 138 Mark Black
3857 MWF 1:25-2:15 BH 237 Scott Cawthon
3858 MWF 2:30-3:20 BH 140 Scott Cawthon
3853 MWF 3:35-4:25 BH 336 Mark Black

Evenings

Number Days Time Room Instructor
3859 MW 7:15-8:30 BH 315 Loïc Lermé

Online Class

Number Instructor Notes
12433 Loïc Lermé Online meetings Thurs. 11:15-12:30
or 7:15-8:30 pm

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: F200 or equivalent.

Grammar, composition, conversation coordinated with the study of cultural texts. Credit given for only one of the following fourth-semester courses: F250 or F265. See our online and hybrid courses page for more information about teaching and learning methods.

FRIT F252: Intermediate French Conversation II (1 cr.)

Number Day/Time Instructor
12695 Arranged Kelly Sax

Corequisite: F250.

This companion course to F250 gives intermediate students the opportunity to practice conversational French in a relaxed setting with peers. Led by advanced students of French working under faculty guidance, group activities may include discussion, games, magazine/newspaper/movie discussions, cultural events, cooking, etc. S/F grading. No credit for French major.

*FRIT F265: Accelerated Second-Year French (4 cr.)

Number Days Time Room Instructor
30938 MTWR 11:15-12:05 GA 0013 Staff

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: Obtain authorization from department.

An accelerated treatment of material covered in both F200 and F250. Grammar, composition, and conversation coordinated with readings of short texts. Students who complete F265 cannot also receive credit for F200 or F250.

If interested, please fill out the FRIT Course Authorization Form.

FRIT F300: Reading & Expression in French (3 cr.)

Number Days Time Room Instructor Notes
3862 MWF 11:15-12:05 BH 237 Eric MacPhail Intro to French Literature
3860 TR 9:30-10:45 BH 206 Guillaume Ansart Intro to French Literature
8569 TR 1:00-2:15 SE 245 Alison Calhoun French Theater Workshop:
Joint with THTR-T483
3861
12894 (honors section)
TR 2:30-3:45 BH 208 Nicolas Valazza Revolutions & Literature
9051 TR 4:00-5:15 GA 007 Lucas Wood Writing the Self

This class provides COLL A&H credits

Prerequisite: F250, F265, or consent of department.

Eric MacPhail

Intro to French Literature

This course serves as an introduction to the study of French literature. We will begin by reading a selection of lyric poems from the Middle Ages to the 20th century. Each student will select one poem from the reader on which to give a class presentation and write a short essay, which will be revised according to the professor’s comments. Next we will read a 17th-century comedy, L’École des femmes by Molière. Students will take an essay exam on the play after preparing the essay questions together in class. Then we will read a selection of short stories from the anthology Contes et nouvelles and students will write and rewrite an essay on the story of their choice. To conclude we will read Françoise Sagan’s 1954 novel Bonjour tristesse, which will be the subject of the final exam. Grades are based on tests, papers, and participation in class discussion. The students will learn how to read and interpret literary texts and how to write an essay in French.

Guillaume Ansart

Intro to French Literature

Introduction to reading and analyzing literature in French. We will read stories by three 19th-century masters of prose fiction: Balzac (Le Colonel Chabert, Sarrasine), Prosper Mérimée (Carmen, La Vénus d’Ille) and Flaubert (Un Cœur simple, La Légende de Saint Julien l’Hospitalier), as well as short lyric poems by Hugo, Baudelaire, Verlaine, Rimbaud, Valéry, Apollinaire and Éluard. Students will write a take-home paper (two versions) and take a midterm and a final exam in class.

Alison Calhoun

French Theater Workshop: Joint with THTR-T483

The French Theater Workshop, taught entirely in French, will offer students an introduction to French reading and expression using both traditional analytical approaches and acting techniques. The idea at the heart of this course is that the demands of learning and performing a literary text (not just a dramatic text, but any text from any genre) serve the pedagogical purposes both of language learning and close reading. Part of class meetings will be used to develop language and analytical skills in French, while each meeting will also involve experimenting with how acting techniques can help students read, understand, interpret, and convey their interpretation of the readings. Students will choose one text to work on throughout the semester, which they will both analyze and perform.

Nicolas Valazza

Revolutions & Literature

From an etymological perspective, the word ‘revolution’ defines an astronomic phenomenon in which a celestial body moves round in a circular course, or the time in which such a body completes a full circuit. Revolution is therefore originally meant to describe a cyclic movement in which everything is supposed to return to its place. But soon this concept came to describe, paradoxically, a major, sudden and violent alteration in the order of things, designating for instance the upheavals of political regimes, as we see in the case of the French Revolution, the Revolution “par excellence.” Given the polysemy of the word, writers across the centuries have been fascinated by the concept of ‘revolution’, making the most of its multiple meanings in their works, and sometimes providing it with new meanings. In this course, we will read several texts belonging to different centuries and literary genres (essay, fiction, theatre and poetry) in which the topic of revolution, whether in its astronomical or political meaning (or both), is developed in various manners. Works studied include: the 17th-century novel Voyage dans la lune by Cyrano de Bergerac, the 18th-century short story Micromégas by Voltaire, the play L’Île des esclaves by Marivaux, some excerpts of the essay on L’Origine de l’inégalité parmi les hommes by Rousseau, the Déclaration des droits de l’homme et du citoyen, a 19th-century selection of poems by Hugo and the 20th-century play Les Justes by Camus. We will also watch two films set at the time of the French Revolution: Danton by Wajda and L’Anglaise et le Duc by Rohmer. Student grades will be based on class preparation and participation (10%), a 10-minute oral presentation (20%), two compositions (30%), a mid-semester exam (20%) and a final essay (20%). The course will be conducted in French.

Lucas Wood

Writing the Self

Language, especially written language, is a privileged mode of self-expression in Western culture. It is through the mediation of words that we make sense of experience and give voice to identity, both public and private. But describing subjectivity is a way of producing it; representing the self in literature means making choices about what a "self" is, and constructing its thoughts, feelings, memories and histories through processes that are at once artful and inevitably artificial. This course will examine various ways in which literary self-fashioning has been practiced and theorized in the French and francophone tradition while also serving as an introduction to literary analysis in French. We will encounter texts from various periods and genres. These may include medieval and modern lyric poetry, Montaigne's Essais, confessional autobiographies by Rousseau and Sarah Kofman, and contemporary novelistic "autofiction."  Graded exercises will include short writing assignments, an oral presentation, and two essays. The course will be conducted in French.

FRIT F305: Stage and Page (3 cr.)
Passion and Anguish, From Page to Stage

Number Days Time Room Instructor
8715 TR 1:00-2:15 BH 245 Margaret Gray

This class provides COLL A&H credits

Prerequisite: F300

In this course, we will:

  • Suffer the anguish of forbidden passion in Jean Racine’s Phèdre
  • Endure the torment of being forever locked up with those who make us suffer in Jean-Paul Sartre’s Huis clos
  • Imagine Sisyphus’s absurd happiness as he forever rolls his eternally doomed rock up the mountainside in Albert Camus’s Le mythe de Sisyphe
  • Languish with Samuel Beckett’s Vladimir and Estragon as they wait for Godot
  • Grope stiffly for words with Marguerite Duras’s Anne-Marie Roche and Michel Nollet, who find themselves in the same hotel following the pronouncement of their divorce in La Musica Deuxième
  • Struggle with Edmond Rostand’s nose-challenged Cyrano to mask his love for Roxane, and with handsome but tongue-tied Christian to express it
  • Plot with Jean Genet’s maids to poison our mistress in Les bonnes
  • Ponder the difference between philosophy and literature with Simone de Beauvoir’s “Littérature et Métaphysique”

Student grades will be based on active class participation; a 10-minute oral presentation; two short (3.5 pp) papers over the course of the semester; midterm and final exams, with analysis of quotations and choice of essay questions.

*FRIT F306: Fiction and Poetry (3 cr.)

*This class has been canceled (F306 #9213)

Number Days Time Room Instructor
9213 TR 9:30-10:45 PV 275 Guillaume Ansart

This class provides COLL A&H credits

Prerequisite: F300

Une moitié du cours sera consacrée à une lecture approfondie d'un grand roman réaliste du XIXe siècle, Le Rouge et le Noir de Stendhal. Parallèlement, nous lirons des poèmes des XIXe et XXe siècles sur le thème de la fonction du poète et de la nature de l’art poétique. Devoirs : une composition à la maison (deux versions), un examen de mi-semestre et un examen final.

FRIT F311: French/Francophone Studies Through Film (3 cr.)
History of French Cinema (Joint with EURO-W 406 and MSCH-F398)

Number Days Time Room Instructor
11260 TR 11:15-12:30 TV 226 Brett Bowles

This class provides COLL A&H, COLL Global Civ & Culture credits

Organized chronologically, this interdisciplinary course traces the development of French cinema from its origins through the present using fourteen exemplary films. We will approach film not only as a form of art and as an expression of French cultural specificity, but as an economic commodity, a tool of socio-political discourse, and a repository of collective memory. Methodologically, we will integrate close analysis of the films' form and content with contextual information related to their production, distribution, and reception. Assignments will include reading response papers, longer analytical essays, in-class exams, and active participation in discussions.

This course will be taught entirely in English. All readings will be in English. Films will be in French with English subtitles.

Does not count for minor but DOES count for major in French.

FRIT F313: Advanced Grammar (3 cr.)

Number Days Time Room Instructor
3863 MWF 1:25-2:15 BH 214 Eric MacPhail
3864 TR 2:30-3:45 GA 0013 Alison Calhoun

Prerequisite: F250

Eric MacPhail

Comprehensive grammar review with in depth study of the most complex features of written French. Four tests including final. Texts are Harper's Grammar of French and the workbook, both available as ClassPaks.

Alison Calhoun

This section of Advanced Grammar will be a fast-paced, dynamic, and playful review of the material you have already covered coupled with an intensive study of that grammar in a literary and critical context supplied in readings as well as students' own writing. This course uses online workbook exercises, giving students instantaneous feedback on their progress. Classroom work will always be based on active learning. F313 can serve either as a complimentary grammar course to be taken simultaneously with F300 or as a springboard course preparing the student for F300 and beyond. Course grades will be based on the best 10 of 12 weekly quizzes (50%), a midterm (15%), a final (20%) and class preparation (15%).

FRIT F314: Creative and Critical Writing in French (3 cr.)

Number Days Time Room Instructor
30969 TR 1:00-2:15 SB 231 Guillaume Ansart

Designed to improve command of written French and build vocabulary through intensive writing. Practice with a variety of literary, expository, and communicative writing styles. Preparation or reinforcement for 300-level classes and study abroad.

FRIT F315: The Sounds and Rhythms of French (4 cr.)

Number Days Time Room Instructor Notes
3865 TR 11:15-12:05 BH 317 Kevin Rottet Lecture
3866 MW 11:15-12:05 BH 319 Liz Myers Drill
3867 MW 1:25-2:15 BH 246 Liz Myers Drill

Students choose one of two drill sections and attend drill plus lecture.

French F315 has three objectives: (1) to develop students' communicative skills by practice in listening comprehension and conversational practice; (2) to improve students' pronunciation accuracy and oral fluency and to train them to evaluate their own pronunciation; (3) to learn about the sound system and its role in the grammar and vocabulary of the language, and also as a marker of social and geographical identity. The focus will be on the pronunciation of Standard French, that is, the speech of the educated Parisian that serves as a model in the French speaking world. However, students will be introduced to salient features of other varieties of French. The course meets four times weekly: two lectures with the professor, and two practice sessions with an associate instructor. All components of the course are taught in French. Prerequisite is FRIT F 250 or equivalent. Choose one drill section to go with this lecture component.

FRIT F363: La France 1800-Aujourd'hui (3 cr.)

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
13737TR11:15-12:30BH 214Oana Panaite

This class provides COLL A&H, COLL Global Civ & Culture credits

Prerequisite: F300

Le cours offre une introduction générale à la civilisation, l’histoire et la culture de la France moderne et contemporaine. L’objectif principal du cours est d’améliorer votre compétence culturelle en vous familiarisant avec la géographie, l’histoire, la politique, l’économie, la société et la culture française. Ces notions vous seront extrêmement utiles nos seulement pour vos études de français mais également pour tout autre formation qui exige une compétence culturelle internationale. Vous comprendrez la tradition et les coutumes d’un autre pays, en faisant des comparaisons avec votre propre expérience et en ayant l’occasion de vous approprier ces informations de manière critique et originale. Nous utiliserons le manuel La France contemporaine, 5e édition, par W. Edmiston et A. Duménil (Cengage Learning). La moyenne finale sera calculée en fonction des critères suivants : la présence, la ponctualité et la participation en classe (20%) ; un examen partiel (20%); un examen final (20%) ; un exposé oral (15%) ; des devoirs écrits hebdomadaires sur Oncourse (25%).

FRIT F375: Thèmes Littéraires et Culturels (3 cr.)
Living, Loving and Fighting under the Nazi Occupation

Number Days Time Room Instructor
8296 TR 2:30-3:45 GA 007 Oana Panaite

This class provides COLL A&H, COLL Global Civ & Culture credits

Prerequisite: F300 or equivalent.

What was life like in France during War World II? What did it mean to be a member of the resistance or a collaborator? Could one be both? How can we reconcile the French values of “liberté, égalité, fraternité” with dictatorship and xenophobia? Are such dilemmas still relevant today? Using episodes from a popular French TV drama – Un village français (2009-2016) – and period writings (literature, history, journalism), we will explore in detail the major issues French people were faced with after the 1940 defeat and the German occupation of the country until 1944. We will address issues such as collaboration and resistance, Communism, nationalism, anti-Semitism and the Vichy Régime, women’s social roles, personal sacrifice and collective responsibility, and the (im)possibility of loving the enemy. The course emphasizes cultural and literary analysis; the final grade is decided based on active class participation (15%), oral exposé (15%), in-class midterm (20%), and two take-home essays with re-writes (25% each). Taught in French.

FRIT F399: Reading for Honors (1-12 cr.)

Number Day/Time
3868 Arranged

For students preparing an honors project to receive a degree with departmental honors in French, contact the Faculty member listed on our honors page, here.

FRIT F402: Intro to French Linguistics (3 cr.)

Number Days Time Room Instructor
30972 TR 2:30-3:45 SY 212 Julie Auger

This class provides COLL N&M credits

Prerequisite: F313 or F314, or consent of instructor.

In this course, we look at the structure of the French language from the point of view of descriptive linguistics, picking up where ordinary grammar books leave off. We will investigate the building blocks of language from the smallest up the largest units – sounds (phonetics and phonology), word structure (morphology), sentence structure (syntax), meaning (semantics), and how it all adds up to make meaning on the larger level ( discourse/pragmatics) – and see how the French language is both similar in structure to other human languages and unique in its particulars. We will be interested in how native speakers of French think they should speak, but also in how they do speak and in the kind of systematicity that underlies both casual and formal speech. Class lectures, discussion, and homework assignments will be done in French.

FRIT F424: Ideas & Culture in 17th Century France (3 cr.)
Feminine Voices in Early Modern France

Number Days Time Room Instructor
30986 TR 9:30-10:45 BH 305 Hall Bjornstad

The turmoil and transformations of early modern France were central in the shaping of modern conceptions of readership, literature, public and politics. This course will examine the role of women in these developments by attending to female voices in central and lesser-known French texts written by seventeenth-century women and men. Texts will include letters, poetry, biographies, a tragedy, fairy tales, and what is often considered the first modern novel, Mme de Lafayette’s La Princesse de Clèves. This corpus will allow us to think about questions of decorum and duty, freedom and modern selfhood, and the imagining of alternative gender roles. Weekly response papers, scaffolded final writing portfolio. The course will be conducted in French.

FRIT F455: Le Roman au vingtième siècle (3 cr.)
Politique des Femmes Écrivains

Number Days Time Room Instructor
30989 TR 4:00-5:15 SE 240 Margaret Gray

This class provides COLL A&H, COLL Global Civ & Culture credits

Ce cours se propose d’étudier le roman du 20ème siècle à travers les interrogations menées par diverses romancières—à l’intérieur comme à l’extérieur de l’Hexagone—de leurs propres cultures. Nous commencerons avec Comment Cuisiner son Mari à l’Africaine (2000) de Calixthe Beyala, récit situé dans le Paris contemporain et hybride de l’immigration, et qui évoque la lutte entre un passé traditionaliste et un présent défini par de fausses solutions. Avec La Jongleuse de Rachilde (1900), nous étudierons la recherche—audacieuse et courageuse--d’une femme indépendante et iconoclaste aux origines exotiques, qui refuse, en « outsider », les conventions et contraintes de son époque. Nous nous trouverons ensuite en Belgique avec Jacqueline Harpman, dont le roman Orlanda (1996) reprend le topos de la dystopie de façon assez subtile—à travers l’histoire d’une héroïne professionnelle qui jouit d’une carrière réussie, tout en étant consciente d’un certain manque, un certain vide : roman qui résume et réunit ces questions d’identité, d’altérité et de transformation à travers une relation qui se noue entre deux parties d’une même personne, la timide Aline et son outrageux double masculin, Orlanda. Nous conclurons avec L’homme à l’envers (1999), roman policier (« rompol », selon l’auteure) de Fred Vargas (notez l’ambiguïté—accentuée par l’abréviation—du prénom mixte) qui interroge certaines conventions littéraires aussi bien que socioculturelles. A travers ces lectures différentes, nous serons attentifs aux capacités de la fiction de représenter et de critiquer les cultures de nos auteures; aux façons dont le pouvoir (politique, social, sexuel, culturel, racial) et ses diverses formes sont étudiés dans ces textes; aux stratégies de résistance, voire d’opposition, personnelle et collective qui y sont explorées; et aux aspects formels—stylistiques et expressifs—de ces textes littéraires. Seront demandés : une participation active à la discussion ; un exposé oral ; un examen de mi-semestre ; une rédaction de 7 pp ; un examen ou une rédaction de fin de semestre.

FRIT X471: French Conversation Group Leadership (1 cr.)

Number Day/Time Instructor
12713 Arranged Kelly Sax

Note: Contact Kelly Sax for permission to enroll in the course.

Under the guidance of their instructor, advanced students of French facilitate weekly French conversation groups for lower level students. Leaders are responsible for planning all group sessions, including discussion topics generated by magazine/newspaper articles and movies, and activities such as games and cooking. No credit for French major. May be repeated for a total of 4 credit hours.

FRIT X490: Individual Readings in French (3 cr.)

Number Day/Time Instructor
3871 Arranged Variable

Independent study on a specific topic not taught in one of this semester's regular courses. If interested, complete the permission form.

FRIT F491: Elementary French for Graduate Students (4 cr.)

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
3869 (undergrad.)
3870 (grad.)
TR7:15-8:45 pmBH 233

Open with consent of the instructor to undergraduates who have already completed the language requirement for the B.A. in another language. Introduction to structures of the language necessary for reading, followed by reading in graded texts of a general nature. No credit for the French major or minor. Credit given for only one of F491 or any French course at the 100 level.

FRIT F499: Reading for Honors (1-12 cr.)

Number Day/Time Instructor
3872 Arranged Massimo Scalabrini

For students preparing an honors project to receive a degree with departmental honors in French, contact the Faculty member listed on our honors page, here.

Italian Courses

FRIT M100: Elementary Italian I (4 cr.)

Monday, Wednesday, Friday Hybrid Classes

Number Days Time Room Instructor
3879 MWF 9:05-9:55 BH 217 Alicia Vitti
3881 MWF 10:10-11:00 BH 319 Alicia Vitti
3880 MWF 11:15-12:05 BH 247 Lino Mioni
3882 MWF 12:20-1:10 FQ 012B Leonardo Cabrini
13800 MWF 12:20-1:10 BH 105 Anna Love
**3883 MWF 1:25-2:15 GA 0009 Leonardo Cabrini
3884 MWF 2:30-3:20 BH 105 Sara Dallavalle

**This section focuses on fashion & design

Monday, Wednesday, Thursday Hybrid Classes

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
3878MWR8:00-8:50 BH 331Alicia Vitti

Evening Class (Traditional)

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
*3885TR7:15-8:45 pmGA 0009canceled

*This class has been canceled (M100 #3885)

Online Class

Number Instructor Notes
13099 Karolina Serafin Online meetings T 9:30-10:45 am
or 6:15-7:30 pm

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Introduction to contemporary Italian language, geography, and culture. Involves a broad variety of assignments and activities that develop grammatical competency and proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Cultural topics and simple cultural comparisons are introduced. Credit given for only one of the following: M100, M110, M115, or M491.

**This section (3883) focuses on fashion & design: This course combines the materials of the first semester of Italian language with a focus on art, design, fashion and merchandising. It is designed for AMID majors and others interested in fashion and design. Through this course you will be exposed to culture and vocabulary connected to your interests while moving forward with your language requirement. You will get the double benefit of studying what you have chosen as your future career in the language that played a crucial role in creating the world of fashion and design. We plan to offer the continuation of this thematic course in the Spring with the second semester of Italian. We hope that by following the language courses connected to your interests you will be able to study in Italy and take courses in Italian as well as discuss topics that interest you in the target language.

Hybrid course: This is a computer enhanced course, which is a combination of traditional classroom time and online instruction. The course meets in class three days a week and involves independent work by students, a portion of which will be performed online. During the semester, students perform a variety of tasks to practice speaking, writing, listening and reading in a cultural context. The grammar focuses on present and simple past tense, allowing the students to speak and write in simple sentences about familiar topics with accuracy and fluency, employing basic conversational strategies.

Evening class (traditional): This evening section of M100 relies less on computer-based learning than the daytime hybrid sections, while still taking advantage of the enhancements available through the online components of the textbook. During the semester, students perform a variety of tasks to practice speaking, writing, listening and reading in a cultural context. The grammar focuses on present and simple past tense, allowing the students to speak and write in simple sentences about familiar topics with accuracy and fluency, employing basic conversational strategies.

Online Class: This beginning Italian course is interactive and conducted completely online. The students do not need to be on campus in order to participate. It requires students to work independently and follow a very structured syllabus. The class meets with the instructor online once a week; meeting hours are flexible. The students are involved in a variety of online tasks such as reading, listening, completing exercises, posting writing assignments and recording responses. All the activities are integrated into a larger cultural context. The grammar focuses on present and simple past tense, allowing the students to speak and write in simple sentences about familiar topics with accuracy and fluency, employing basic conversational strategies.

FRIT M110: Italian Language through Opera (4 cr.)

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
13277MTWR11:15-12:05BH 138Rosa Borgonovi

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

This intensive beginning course covers the material of two semesters in one (M100 & M150). This course is intended for people who want to study Italian and are interested in opera and operatic world. The material and assessments will focus on Italian opera, but students will learn today's Italian spoken language. The course meets four times a week and also involves independent work by students, a portion of which will be performed online. During the semester, students are involved in a variety of tasks practicing speaking, writing, listening and reading in a cultural context. The grammar focuses on present, past and future tenses, allowing the students to speak and write in simple sentences about familiar topics with accuracy and fluency. The course is fast-paced and very rewarding. It is recommended for students with previous experience learning foreign languages (specifically Romance languages). If interested, please fill out the online authorization form.

FRIT M115: Accelerated Elementary Italian (4 cr.)
A Journey in Italian Beauty (A College Themester Course)

Number Days Time Room Instructor
3886 MTWR 11:15-12:05 GA 0009 Karolina Serafin College Themester Course

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: Obtain authorization from department.

Through this course you will be exposed to centuries of Italian beauty in art, music, design and fasion while learning the Italian language. You will analyze the concept of il Bel Paese, discover Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo, learn about the beauty of Italian architecture, explore Italian fashion, Italian culinary art, Italian design, and learn to appreciate the humor in Italian opera while falling in love with Italian art, all of this while speaking in the language of Dante and Petrarch.

Through this journey you will develop a deeper appreciation of a great culture, also through hands-on experience: you will go on two field trips, be part of collaborative projects, and enjoy extracurricular events connected to the class. This Fall you will get to know and appreciate the beauty of Italy and its language like never before!

If interested, please fill out the online authorization form.

If you have any trouble with the form or have additional questions please email us at the Department of French and Italian and we can help you.

FRIT M150: Elementary Italian II (4 cr.)

Hybrid Class

Number Days Time Room Instructor
3887 MWF 1:25-2:15 BH 015 Marzia Bagnasco
35843 MWF 11:15-12:05 SB 220 Marzia Bagnasco

Online Class

Number Instructor Notes
13100 Karolina Serafin Online meetings Thurs. 9:30-10:45 am
or 6:15-7:30 pm

Note: Contact Instructor Karolina Serafin for permission to enroll in the above online class.

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: M100.

Continued introduction to contemporary Italian language, geography, and culture. Involves a broad variety of assignments and activities that build grammatical competency and proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Practice with new cultural topics and basic cultural analysis. Credit given for only one of the following: M110, M115, M150, or M491.

Hybrid Class: This is a computer enhanced course, which is a combination of traditional classroom time and online instruction. The course meets three days a week and involves independent work by students, a portion of which will be performed online. This course follows M100 and continues to present the beginning-level concepts of Italian language and culture. During the semester students perform a variety of tasks to practice speaking, writing, listening and reading in a cultural context. The grammar focuses on past and future tense, allowing the students to speak and write in simple sentences with accuracy and fluency about familiar topics.

Online Class: This second-semester Italian course is interactive and conducted completely online. The students do not need to be on campus in order to participate. It requires students to work independently and follow a very structured syllabus. The class meets with the instructor online once a week; meeting hours are flexible. The students are involved in a variety of online tasks such as reading, listening, completing exercises, posting writing assignments and recording responses. All the activities are integrated into a larger cultural context. The grammar focuses on past and future tense, allowing the students to speak and write in simple sentences about familiar topics with accuracy and fluency.

FRIT M200: Intermediate Italian I (3 cr.)

Monday, Wednesday, Friday

Number Days Time Room Instructor
3889 MWF 10:10-11:00 SB 220 Francesco Samarini
15585 MWF 11:15-12:05 BH 015 Francesco Samarini
3890 MWF 12:20-1:10 BH 236 Rosa Borgonovi
3891 MWF 1:25-2:15 BH 105 Carlotta Vacchelli

Evening Class

Number Days Time Room Instructor
*9905 TR 7:15-8:30 BH 314 canceled

*This class has been canceled (M200 #9905)

Online Class

Number Instructor Notes
3888 Anna Love Online meetings Tues. 9:30-10:45 am
or 6:15-7:30 pm

Note: Contact Instructor Karolina Serafin for permission to enroll in the above online course section.

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: M110, M115, M150, or equivalent.

This course is a continuation of Elementary Italian II. In class the students concentrate on reviewing and refining structures learned at the 100-level, but this time at an intermediate level. During the semester students are involved in a variety of tasks practicing speaking, writing, listening and reading in cultural context. The course features study of original Italian short movies that offer the first stimulus for learning intermediate-level vocabulary, grammar and culture. Credit given for only one of M200 or M215.

Online Class: This Intermediate I Italian course is interactive and conducted completely online. The students do not need to be on campus in order to participate. It requires students to work independently and follow a very structured syllabus. The class meets with the instructor online once a week; meeting hours are flexible. The students are involved in a variety of online tasks at the intermediate level, such as reading, listening, completing exercises, posting writing assignments and recording responses. All the activities are integrated into a larger cultural context. The grammar reviews all the material learned in previous courses in an intermediate context and increases skills by adding more intermediate structures and vocabulary.

FRIT M215: Accelerated Second-Year Italian (4 cr.)

Number Days Time Room Instructor
8396 MTWR 1:25-2:15 BH 315 Lino Mioni

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: M115 or equivalent (M100 and M150), and permission from department.

This intensive intermediate-level Italian course covers the material of two semesters in one (M200 & M250). The course builds upon the first three semesters of beginning Italian (or equivalent) adding the unique feature of short films as the first stimulus for learning intermediate-level vocabulary, grammar, and cultural concepts. The various activities aim to strengthen proficiency in listening, speaking, reading and writing, and students will gain the ability to understand, evaluate, compare, and appreciate many aspects of Italian culture. The course is fast-paced and very rewarding. It is recommended for students with previous experience learning foreign languages (specifically Romance languages). Students must be recommended for this course by their Italian instructor in M150, M110 or M115, or arrange to meet with Dr. Karolina Serafin to obtain permission. Credit given for only one of the following: M215 or M200-M250.

FRIT M222: Topics in Italian Culture
Italian Comics and Graphic Novels

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
15206TR11:15-12:30BH 237Marco Arnaudo

This class provides COLL A&H, COLL Global Civ & Culture, and GenEd A&H, GenEd World Cultures credits

This course is taught in English.

Covers the development of the comics and graphic novels in Italy from their origins to the present. Includes a theoretical section about comics as a medium.

FRIT M237: Boccaccio's Social Decameron (3 cr.)
Joint with MEST-M 200 (34913) --THIS CLASS HAS BEEN CANCELLED --

FRIT M238: Italian Visual/Music and Literary Culture (3 cr.)
Societal and Cultural Changes through Landmark Films

Number Days Time Room Instructor
13807 TR 2:30-3:45 BH 332 Antonio Vitti

This class provides COLL A&H, COLL Global Civ & Culture, and GenEd A&H, GenEd World Cultures credits

The objective of this course is to gain a better understanding of the often complex mechanism of Italian politics, the intriguing regional differences, and the cultural development that have shaped the Italian Republic. Through the screening of 12 films, this survey will study cinema from the 60s to the contemporary Italian film scene. A study on the representation of women, masculinity, labor movements and terrorism in cinema will also be part of this course. It will also include the role of film in Italian society as well as the unique artistic and technical achievements and obstacles for Italian filmmakers. Topics covered include:

  • Basics of Film Language
  • Elements of Italian History Religion, Gender, Sexuality, Industrialization, Internal Migration, and Immigration in a Global Context

FRIT M250: Intermediate Italian II (3 cr.)

Number Days Time Room Instructor
*3892 MWF 11:15-12:05 BH 105 canceled
6119 MWF 1:25-2:15 BH 229 Pietro Tripano

*This class has been canceled (M250 #3892)

Online Class

Number Instructor Notes
14377 Pietro Tripano Online meetings Thurs. 9:30-10:45 am
or 6:15-7:30 pm

Note: Contact Instructor Karolina Serafin for permission to enroll in the above online class.

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: M200 or equivalent.

This second-year Italian course meets three times a week and builds upon the first three semesters of beginning and intermediate Italian (or equivalent). In M250, students concentrate on learning how to express their ideas and debate the pros and cons of certain situations as well as to offer advice and express opinions on a variety of familiar subjects, all in the Italian language. The students are involved in a variety of tasks practicing speaking, writing, listening and reading in a cultural context. The course includes study of original Italian short movies that offer the first stimulus for learning intermediate-level vocabulary, grammar and culture.

Online Class: This Intermediate II Italian course is interactive and conducted completely online. The students do not need to be on campus in order to participate. It requires students to work independently and follow a very structured syllabus. The class meets with the instructor online once a week; meeting hours are flexible. The students are involved in a variety of online tasks at the intermediate level, such as reading, listening, completing exercises, posting writing assignments and recording responses. All the activities are integrated into a larger cultural context. The grammar focuses on intermediate level structures, such as subjunctives.

FRIT M300: Italian Conversation & Diction (4 cr.)

Number Days Time Room Instructor
6120 MTWRF 10:10-11:00am AC C101 Alicia Vitti & Sara Dallavalle
*31030 MTWRF 11:15-12:05 WH 203 canceled

*Class 31030 has been canceled

Prerequisite: M250 or consent of instructor.

Study of advanced language structures with focus on contemporary cinema and speaking skill.

FRIT M308: Masterpieces of Italian Literature II (3 cr.)
Italian Literature from 1800 to present

Number Days Time Room Instructor
14833 TR 1:00-2:15 BH 219 Colleen Ryan

This class provides COLL A&H, COLL Global Civ & Culture credits

Prerequisite: M300 or M301 or consent of instructor.

In this course we will explore texts of various genre by Italian authors and artists from the 1800s through our current times. Students will gain and understanding of the social, historical, and political contexts depicted in the works and/or in which they were made. They will able to describe and compare the principles of different eras and movements, and they will analyze works according to different themes and critical perspectives Conducted in Italian.

FRIT M450: Seminar in Italian Literature (3 cr.)
Dante and his legacy

Number Days Time Room Instructor
31032 TR 9:30-10:45 BH 139 H. Wayne Storey

This class provides COLL A&H credits

Prerequisite: M305, M306, M307, M308, M390 or consent of instructor.

This class considers the thematic, conceptual and formal inheritance that Dante gives to Italian literature and cultures, from Boccaccio (1313–1375) to Benigni (b. 1952). Reviewing influential passages and episodes from the Divine Comedy, we will explore Dante’s influence on writers such as Boccaccio, Petrarch, Machiavelli, and Calvino, his role in Fascist architecture (Terragni’s Danteum) and the arts (including IU’s “Ugolino and His Sons” [Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux], a gift of the French people after World War II), Dante’s presence in modern Italian education, morality and culture (including his revival at the hands of Roberto Benigni), and even his impact on the spiritual life of those who study him, from Arcangela Tarabotti to the Dante translator and detective/crime writer Dorothy L. Sayers.

FRIT X493: Individual Readings in Italian Literature (1-3 cr.)

Number Day/Time Instructor
3893 Arranged variable

Independent study on a specific topic not taught in one of this semester's regular courses. If interested, complete the permission form.

FRIT M499: Reading for Honors (3 cr.)

Number Day/Time Instructor
3894 Arranged Massimo Scalabrini

For students preparing an honors project to receive a degree with departmental honors in Italian.

Interdisciplinary Courses

COLL C103: Critical Approaches in Arts & Humanities (3 cr.)
Laughter, Humor and Wit in the Italian Renaissance

Number Days Time Room Instructor
11414 TR 11:15-12:05 LI 033 Massimo Scalabrini

Renaissance artists and writers were as committed to advocating the dignity of humankind and its central place in the universe as they were to making fun of or laughing at themselves and each other. This course will examine the comic literature of the Italian Renaissance. We will explore the nature and various expressions of comedy in genres such as the short story, the facetia (‘witty anecdote’), the apologue, the comic play, the epic and satiric poem and the treatise. In doing so we will address the following questions, among others: What is the relation of laughter and ignorance, error, moral and physical deformity? Does laughter bring people together or does it set them apart? How does comedy articulate the ethical concepts of innocence and guilt? How are conflicts dealt with in comic texts? We will read texts by Boccaccio, Ariosto, Machiavelli, Aretino, Castiglione and Della Casa, among others, and we will also discuss a selection of relevant historical and critical/theoretical materials, particularly the reflections on comedy by Plato, Aristotle and Cicero. While this course is firmly grounded in Italian Renaissance literature, we will also read texts from other European traditions that were inspired or prompted by the Latin and vernacular models produced in the Italian peninsula. Students will write three short essays, take six quizzes and a final exam.

HON H 233: Great Authors, Composers & artists (3 cr.)
Rebels With and Without a Cause

Number Days Time Room Instructor
14719 MWF 9:05-9:55 BH 138 Emanuel Mickel

In this course, students will study important works in the Western Tradition that represent aspects of the human being that make difficult a peaceful co-existence among the diverse peoples that populate the earth. We shall also explore those works that undergird the human being’s desire to be free from human-imposed restraints that prevent the freedom of people to enjoy equal opportunity and amicable discourse among diverse nations and peoples. In this course we also explore negative aspects of man’s behavior emphasized in philosophical, theological, and literary works that place the blame for man’s bad treatment of his fellow human being on his own selfishness. In other political, philosophical, and religious treatises, we see that same human being urging and demonstrating a behavior which is the antidote to the human being’s innate selfishness. In the four novels students read (French, English, Russian, and American) we analyze the characters and events in the terms of the theoretical works students have read and studied earlier.

HON H 233: Great Authors, Composers & artists (3 cr.)
Tragedy: When Life Imitates Art

Number Days Time Room Instructor
30446 TR 11:15-12:30 HU 111 Hall Bjornstad

What do we mean when we say that an event is tragic? Is a death more tragic if it is the result of a murder than if it happened by accident or from natural causes? Do we say it is tragic in order to make sense of it or as a way of saying that we give up to explain it? Is it an expression of absence of meaning or pointing toward a logic of a different order? Is tragedy linked to a sense of justice or does it respond to the lack of justice? What role do religion, politics and chance play in our perception of life’s misery? And why has tragedy always been so central to popular culture, from the public performances of ancient Greece to the rise and fall of celebrities like Amy Winehouse? Indeed, how can we explain the pleasure we get from regarding the pain of others? In this course, we will address questions like these, as a way to explore tragedy in its relation to life, art, death and hope.

Material studied will include world famous literary works from the Bible, Greek tragedies, Shakespeare, F. Scott Fitzgerald, examples from film and TV series (including the 1995 film by Mathieu Kassovitz, La Haine/ Hatred; episodes from Law and Order and The Wire), as well as critical texts related to the questions above, from Aristotle and Nietzsche to contemporary thinkers like Susan Sontag and Stanley Cavell. Special emphasis will be put on the idea of tragedy in the twenty-first century, in both critical writing and artistic production (and pursued by the students in final research projects).



French Courses

FRIT F100: Elementary French I (4 cr.)

Monday, Wednesday, Friday

Number Days Time Room Instructor Notes
6001 MWF 9:05-9:55 BH 333 Leila El-Murr Hybrid
6005 MWF 10:10-11:00 BH 015 Leila El-Murr Hybrid
6002 MWF 11:15-12:05 BH 246 Kathryn Bastin Hybrid
6003 MWF 12:20-1:10 BH 139 Yuanshuai Cui Hybrid
6004 MWF 1:25-2:15 BH 332 Yuanshuai Cui Hybrid

Monday, Wednesday

Number Days Time Room Instructor Notes
6006 MWR 7:15-8:45 BH 322 Marcel Tchatchou Hybrid

Online Class

Number Instructor Notes
15850 Kathryn Bastin Online meeting times
Tues. 11:15-12:30 or 5:45-7:00 pm

Note: Contact The Department of French and Italian for permission to enroll in the above online class.

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Introduction to French language and selected aspects of French civilization and culture. Credit given for only one of F100, F115, or F491. See our online and hybrid courses page for more information about teaching and learning methods.

FRIT F115: Accelerated Elementary French (4 cr.)

Number Days Time Room Instructor
11164 MTWR 11:15-12:05 SY 210 Amanda Vredenburgh

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: Obtain authorization from department.

An accelerated treatment of material covered in both F100 and F150 designed for superior students and students with previous training in another foreign language. Credit given for only one of F115 and F100; Credit given for only one of F115 and F150. If interested, please fill out the online authorization form.

FRIT F150: Elementary French II: Language and Culture (4 cr.)

Monday, Wednesday, Friday

Number Days Time Room Instructor Notes
6007 MWF 9:05-9:55 BH 238 Alana Duncan hybrid
6009 MWF 10:10-11:00 WH 109 Rishani Merrinage De Costa hybrid
6010 MWF 11:15-12:05 FQ 012B Alana Duncan hybrid
6012 MWF 1:25-2:15 BH 307 Scott Evans hybrid
6013 MWF 2:30-3:20 SY 212 Rishani Merrinage De Costa hybrid

Monday, Wednesday evening

Number Days Time Room Instructor Notes
6014 MW 7:15-8:45 pm SY 210 Jeffrey Long Traditional

Monday, Wednesday, Thursday

Number Days Time Room Instructor Notes
6008 MWR 8:00-8:50 SY 212 Amber Panwitz Hybrid

Online Class

Number Instructor Notes
6011 Amber Panwitz Online meetings
Thurs. either 11:15-12:30 or 5:45-7:00 pm

Note: Contact The Department of French and Italian for permission to enroll in the above online class.

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: F100.

Basic structures of the French language and selected topics of French civilization and culture. Credit given for only one of the following: F115, F150, or F491. See our online and hybrid courses page for more information about teaching and learning methods.

FRIT F152: Beginning French Conversation II (1 cr.)

Number Day/Time Instructor
15195 Arranged Kelly Sax

Corequisite: F150.

This companion course to F150 gives beginning students the opportunity to practice conversational French in a relaxed setting with peers. Led by advanced students of French working under faculty guidance, group activities may include discussion, games, magazine/newspaper/movie discussions, cultural events, cooking, etc. S/F grading. No credit for French major.

FRIT F200: Second-Year French I: Language and Culture (3 cr.)

Monday, Wednesday, Friday

Number Days Time Room Instructor
6016 MWF 10:10-11:00 BH 015 Cris Robu
6017 MWF 12:20-1:10 BH 336 Renata Uzzell
6018 MWF 1:25-2:15 BH 236 Renata Uzzell
6019 MWF 2:30-3:20 GA 0013 Martin Maillot

Monday, Wednesday evening

Number Days Time Room Instructor
6020 MWR 7:15-8:30pm GA 0009 Charlène Gilbert

Online

Number Instructor Notes
6015 Jill Owen Online meetings
Tues. either 11:15-12:30 or 5:45-7:00 pm

Note: Contact The Department of French and Italian for permission to enroll in the above online class.

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: F150 or equivalent.

Grammar, composition, conversation coordinated with the study of cultural texts. Credit given for only one of the following third-semester courses: F200 or F265. See our online and hybrid courses page for more information about teaching and learning methods.

FRIT F202: Intermediate French Conversation I (1 cr.)

Number Day/Time Instructor
15196 Arranged Kelly Sax

Corequisite: F200.

This companion course to F200 gives intermediate students the opportunity to practice conversational French in a relaxed setting with peers. Led by advanced students of French working under faculty guidance, group activities may include discussion, games, magazine/newspaper/movie discussions, cultural events, cooking, etc. S/F grading. No credit for French major.

FRIT F225: Studies in French Culture--2nd 8 weeks only (3 cr.)
Contemporary France
Brett Bowles

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor Notes
35918TR4:00-6:30BH 315Brett Bowles 2nd 8 weeks

This course offers a critical perspective on the evolution of French politics, society, and culture since the Second World War, with a focus on France's place in Europe and in relation to the United States. Topics covered will include national identity, cultural pluralism / minority rights, race relations, educational / political / legal institutions, gender (in)equality, and the mass media. The course will be taught entirely in English.

FRIT F226: (3 cr.)
Paris: Biography of a City
Lucas Wood

Number Days Time Room Instructor
30947 TR 2:30-3:45 BH 15 Lucas George Wood

This class provides CASE A&H, CASE Global Civ & Culture, and GenEd World Cultures credits.

This course surveys the history, culture, art, literature and social life of the city of Paris as they have evolved from Gallo-Roman times to the present. Exploring the continuities and changes that have marked 2000 years of Parisian and European history, we will study the city’s developing urban fabric in the context of the cultural moments and movements that have shaped and been shaped by it. We will study revolutions, wars, painting, sculpture, architecture, graphic art, and literature as well as the physical geography of the city itself, reading representative primary texts from every period. The course will be taught in English and no knowledge of French is required.

FRIT F230: Francophone Culture in Context (1 cr.)
Spring Break in Paris!
Kelly Sax & Lucas Wood
**CANCELED

Number Days Instructor
32832 Spring Break
March 11-19 2017
Kelly Sax & Lucas Wood

Co-requisite or prerequisite (taken within the academic year): FRIT F222, F225, F226, or F227. Requires application and approval of instructor(s). Representation from more than one co-requisite course preferred.

This intensive Spring Break study abroad experience in Paris is specially designed to complement and contextualize coursework undertaken in FRIT F226 and F227. Over the course of a week (March 11-19), we will thoroughly explore the City of Lights from a variety of perspectives, visiting key architectural, artistic, and cultural monuments (Notre-Dame, Versailles, Sainte-Chapelle, etc.) and museums (Louvre, Musée d’Orsay) that root contemporary Paris and France in a rich history of historical evolution whose traces we will seek out in the temporally layered modern metropolis. We will also learn about the history of dress in French culture at the City of Paris Fashion Museum and experience France's gastronomic traditions by tasting regional cheese and wine and dining at the city's oldest restaurant, opened in 1686. Knowledge of French not required. (Graded pass/fail)

See course syllabus for more details!

Note: Contact The Department of French and Italian for permission to enroll in this class.

FRIT F250: Second-Year French II: Language and Culture (3 cr.)

Monday, Wednesday, Friday

Number Days Time Room Instructor
6022 MWF 9:05-9:55 BH 232 Manali Allen
6026 MWF 11:15-12:05 WH 106 (MW)
BH 337 (Friday only!)
Manali Allen
6027 MWF 12:20-1:10 BH 322 Jacob Ladyga
6028 MWF 1:25-2:15 BH 331 Liz Myers
6024 MWF 1:25-2:15 BH 333 Mark Black
6025 MWF 2:30-3:20 GA 0007 Liz Myers

Monday, Wednesday Evenings

Number Days Time Room Instructor
6029 MW 7:15-8:30pm SY 108 Scott Cawthon

Monday, Wednesday, Thursday

Number Days Time Room Instructor
6023 MWR 8:00-8:50 BH 231 Aiko MacPhail

Online Class

Number Instructor Notes
6021 Mark Black Online meetings
Thurs. either 11:15-12:30 or 5:45-7:00 pm

Note: Contact The Department of French and Italian for permission to enroll in the above online class.

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: F200 or equivalent.

Grammar, composition, conversation coordinated with the study of cultural texts. Credit given for only one of the following fourth-semester courses: F250 or F265. See our online and hybrid courses page for more information about teaching and learning methods.

FRIT F252: Intermediate French Conversation II (1 cr.)

Number Day/Time Instructor
15194 Arranged Kelly Sax

Corequisite: F250.

This companion course to F250 gives intermediate students the opportunity to practice conversational French in a relaxed setting with peers. Led by advanced students of French working under faculty guidance, group activities may include discussion, games, magazine/newspaper/movie discussions, cultural events, cooking, etc. S/F grading. No credit for French major.

FRIT F265: Accelerated Second-Year French (4 cr.)

Number Days Time Room Instructor
17109 MTWR 12:20-1:10 WH 202 Georgy Khabarovskiy

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: Obtain authorization from department.

An accelerated treatment of material covered in both F200 and F250. Grammar, composition, and conversation coordinated with readings of short texts. Students who complete F265 cannot also receive credit for F200 or F250.

If interested, please fill out the online authorization form.

FRIT F300: Reading & Expression in French (3 cr.)

Number Days Time Room Instructor Title
6030 TR 2:30-3:45 BH 105 Flavien Falantin Dangerous Readings
6031 TR 1:00-2:15 BH 140 Margaret Gray The Heart and Its Reasons
6032 TR 9:30-10:45 BH 333 Oana Panaïté Children of the Colonies: Guadeloupe, Haiti, Martinique

This class provides CASE A&H credits

Prerequisite: F250, F265, or consent of department.

Flavien Falantin

F300

Dangerous Readings

Can we say that reading is a dangerous activity? What will happen when a character is reading a subversive and disruptive novel? Is a book able to change our lives? This course serves as an introduction to the study of French literature but also as an exploration of the reader's self. We will explore mysteries such as:

  • How was Catherine de Medicis, famous queen of France, bewitched by Nostradamus’ prophecies?
  • What novels pushed the Marquise de Brinvilliers to poison the royal court of Versailles?
  • Why did classical heroines who read love stories, such as Madame Bovary, become delusional or mad?
  • Who killed the step-mother of Cécile in the novel Bonjour tristesse? Cécile herself or Cécile’s readings?
  • What will happen to a young journalist like Nina, in the novel Hygiène de l’assassin, who speaks too much with a bizarre Nobel Prize laureate

The plots of these fictional works will be analyzed in class through a sociological, psychoanalytical and historical perspective. Since all readings are in French, they will always be short and accessible for learners. Student grades will be based on class participation, one oral presentation, comprehension questions, a short novel description (3-4 pp), a midterm and a take home exam for the final. Class taught in French.

Margaret Gray

F300

The Heart and Its Reasons

An introduction to French literature, this course has three goals: a) to provide further exposure to a variety of literary genres in French, including poetry, theatre, the novel and the short story b) to develop and sharpen reading skills through practice in close reading and techniques of literary analysis c) to foster student progress in practical skills such as aural and written comprehension, as well as oral and written expression. “The heart has its reasons, which reason does not know” wrote seventeenth-century thinker Blaise Pascal in assessing the tangled relationship between love and reason which underlies many of our texts. Beginning with Renaissance love poems in the Petrarchan tradition, we will analyze the reprise and transformation of these forms in the Romantic lyrics of the nineteenth century, as well as their subsequent post-Symbolist ironizations. We will then proceed with our study of irony in the context of a different genre, theatre, as we see that Jean Anouilh’s manipulation of the ideal of romantic love in Le Bal des Voleurs becomes a vehicle for powerful social critique. Along with its probing questions of class difference, however, the play offers a delightful mix of bumbling thieves attempting to get the best of a rich and canny dowager and her eligible nieces, as true love and personal honor triumph across social and economic differences. Turning next to narrative, we will study David Foenkinos’s acclaimed 2009 novel La délicatesse with its issues of self-reconstruction after loss in a different yet equally heart-warming love story, that of a young professional woman and an improbable subordinate. The semester will conclude with a selection of short stories illuminating thematic and formal issues, from problems of moral responsibility (Albert Camus) to voice (Henri Thomas) and point of view (Jean-Louis Curtis). Exercises will include an in-class writing assignment, a midterm exam consisting of quotations to analyze and an essay question, a paper of literary analysis and a comprehensive final exam. All discussion and written work will be conducted in French.

Oana Panaïté

F300

Children of the Colonies: Guadeloupe, Haiti, Martinique

This course will delve into the fascinating topic of France's colonial legacy in the Caribbean. We will read literary texts and watch films that describe and analyze the French colonization of the Antilles, particularly the islands of Guadeloupe, Haiti and Martinique. We will also examine the long-term effects of the Atlantic Slave Trade, the plantation culture, the rules of the “Black Code,” and the struggles for self-determination and, in Haiti's case, independence on today’s political, social, economic, racial, and cultural landscape of these islands. We will take advantage of the presence on the IUB campus of two major artists, Dany Laferrière (Haiti) and Patrick Chamoiseau (Martinique) to deepen our understanding of these questions. Books available at the IU Bookstore.

**FRIT F305: Stage and Page (3 cr.)

**This class has been canceled (F305 #10695)

Number Days Time Room Instructor
10695 TR 1:00-2:15 SY 103 Aiko Okamoto-MacPhail

This class provides CASE A&H credits

Prerequisite: F300

This course focuses on two of the genres in French Literature, namely theater and essay by reading the most representative and/or most recent works in each genre. In theater, we start with the “century of theater” which is the seventeenth century with two authors who champion French comedy and tragedy: the comedy Le Tartuffe by Molière and the most often played piece by Jean Racine, the tragedy Phèdre. We then move to the nineteenth century and read Victor Hugo’s Hernani, both his preface as an essay and his play as a theatrical piece, and we end this century with the popular French comic playwright Eugène Labiche and his Le Prix Martin. In this way, we read two comedies and two tragedies. As for the essay, we will read excerpts from René Descartes’ Méditations and the two most recent essays of the philosopher Michel Serres, one of which was published this year Darwin, Bonaparte et le Samaritain and the other Petite Poucette. Written for a wide public in an easy language, the former essay is about history and the latter is about the most up-to-date topic of Internet and computer culture. Through the semester, we will cover almost all the whole course of French Literature to the twenty-first century, by reading the most representative works presented on French stages and pages.

FRIT F306: Fiction and Poetry (3 cr.)
Exile and Exoticism

Number Days Time Room Instructor
6033 TR 2:30-3:45 HU 111 Nicolas Valazza

This class provides CASE A&H credits

Prerequisite: F300

The fascination for the unknown place has always played a prominent role in literature. At least since Ulysses’ peregrinations in his attempt to go back to Ithaca, as they are recounted by Homer in the Odyssey, the remote place has never ceased to provide writers with themes to unfold in their works. Yet this fascination is often of an ambivalent nature, for the enthusiasm that usually characterizes the discovery of a new place is frequently counterbalanced by a sense of nostalgia. Moreover, if many writers and literary characters were eager to leave home in order to travel the world and to relate their experiences, many others, on the contrary, were forced to depart from their place of origin and take the road of exile, sometimes finding in writing the only link with their native place..

In this course, we will study the ambivalence of feelings that an unknown place is likely to provoke in writers, by reading several narratives and a selection of poems that develop the motifs of exoticism and/or exile. Authors considered include Marco Polo, Diderot, Voltaire, Chateaubriand, Hugo, Senghor, Le Clézio, Djebar, among others.

The final grade will be based on class preparation and participation (10%), a mid-term exam (25%), an oral presentation (25%) and a final paper (40%). The course will be conducted in French.

Books: Marco Polo, Le Livre des merveilles. Denis Diderot, Supplement au voyage de Bougainville. François-René Chateaubriand, Atala, René. J.M.G. Le Clezio, Mondo et autres histoires.

FRIT F313: Advanced Grammar (3 cr.)

Number Days Time Room Instructor
6035 MWF 11:15-12:05 BH 332 Eric MacPhail
*6034 MWF 1:25-2:15 BH 236 CANCELLED
11520 TR 1:00-2:15 GA 0011 Alison Calhoun

Prerequisite: F250

*Class# 6034 has been canceled

Eric MacPhail

Comprehensive grammar review with in depth study of the most complex features of written French. Four tests including final. Texts are Harper's Grammar of French and the workbook, both available as ClassPaks.

Alison Calhoun

This section of Advanced Grammar will be a fast-paced, dynamic, and playful review of the material you have already covered coupled with an intensive study of that grammar in a literary and critical context supplied in readings as well as students' own writing. This course uses online workbook exercises, giving students instantaneous feedback on their progress. Classroom work will always be based on active learning. F313 can serve either as a complimentary grammar course to be taken simultaneously with F300 or as a springboard course preparing the student for F300 and beyond. Course grades will be based on the best 10 of 12 weekly quizzes (50%), a midterm (15%), a final (20%) and class preparation (15%).

FRIT F316: Conversational Practice (3 cr.)

Number Days Time Room Instructor
6036 MWF 12:20-1:10 BH 140 Kate Bastin
6037 MWF 11:15-12:05 BH 221 Noëlle Lindstrom
6038 TR 7:15-8:30pm WH 116 Flavien Falantin

Prerequisite: F250 or F265.

Recent and classic award-winning feature-length French films (comedies, dramas, thrillers) provide the basis for vocabulary expansion, in-class discussion and debates, and an increased understanding of various French cultural and historical issues, including immigration, WWII, regional differences, and religious conflict. Class time will maximize speaking opportunities. Grading is based on in-class participation, presentations, and oral and written exams. NOTE: Students are required to watch the films outside of class (online streaming).

FRIT F317: French in the Business World (3 cr.)
Guillaume Ansart

Number Days Time Room Instructor
6039 TR 1:00-2:15 WH 109 Guillaume Ansart

This class provides CASE S&H credit

Prerequisite: F250 or equivalent.

Introduction to the language of business activities in France and to the structure and functioning of various aspects of contemporary French economic life. Awareness of the general cultural context within which business activities take place in France will also be an important dimension of the course. Weekly exercises will include oral activities as well as reading and writing (translation, reading of articles from French newspapers and magazines on current economic issues, etc). Course taught in French. No previous knowledge of the world of French business is required.

FRIT F361: La France Médiévale (jusqu'à 1500) (3 cr.)
Lucas Wood

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
31017TR5:45-7:00pmSY 137Lucas Wood

Prerequisite: F300

This class fulfills CASE A&H credit and CASE Global Civ & Culture credit

This course serves as a general introduction to the cultural history of medieval France from the Carolingian Empire to 1500. The course will focus on several key social and political ideologies (feudalism, chivalry, courtliness), milieux (the court, the church, the university) and moments (the Crusades and the Hundred Years’ War). With the help of both primary and secondary texts, we will approach each focus area as a site of cultural production and transformation. Throughout the course, we will also turn a critical eye back on the practices and presuppositions that condition our own historical understanding. In particular, we will ask from a number of angles the question that the course’s title seems to beg: given the cosmopolitanism of aristocratic and religious cultures in the Middle Ages and the predominance of political models other than that of the nation-state, what does it mean to talk about “medieval France”? The course will be taught in French.

FRIT F362: La France 1500-1800 (3 cr.)
Alison Calhoun

Number Days Time Room Instructor
14685 TR 2:30-3:45 GA 1100 Alison Calhoun

Prerequisite: F300

This class fulfills CASE A&H credit and CASE Global Civ & Culture credit

This course will introduce students to a cultural history of France from the Renaissance to the Revolution. We will draw from diverse artefacts from France’s rich history to study new forms of political power, sociability, and religious creeds, along with a variety of cultural phenomena that shaped national identity, popular culture, and daily life. A significant portion of the course will focus on building vocabulary, style, and expression in French, so that students improve their listening, speaking, and writing skills. Grades will be based on two exams, two short essays, and participation in regular class assignments. This course is appropriate for students aiming to widen their knowledge of French history and culture, improve their language skills, or both.

FRIT F375: Thèmes Littéraires et Culturels (3 cr.)
Mysteries of Love and Death: French Detective Fiction
Margaret Gray

Number Days Time Room Instructor
10463 TR 9:30-10:45 GA 007 Margaret Gray

This class provides CASE A&H, CASE Global Civ & Culture credits

Prerequisite: F300 or equivalent.

Detective fiction, argued literary critic Tzvetan Todorov, dramatizes the activity at work in all efforts of interpretation. As such, the genre gives rise to a foundational model of reading, with its efforts of organization: strategies such as the identification of patterns of meaning, leading to coherence and resolution of tensions and enigmas. In this way, the detective pursuing an elusive truth enacts the quest engaged by any reader as s/he attempts to derive meaning from any text. This course proposes to test such a claim across a variety of French detective fictions. We will begin, however, with symbolist poet Charles Baudelaire’s translation of Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Purloined Letter”: the act reputed to have brought the detective genre to France. In novelist Sébastien Japrisot’s Piège pour Cendrillon [Trap for Cinderella] we will trace the engagement of various cultural myths, from the « Cinderella » fairy tale as published by Madame LePrince de Beaumont in the 18th century to the chic and glamour of the contemporary Riviera. Even as the text ironizes such myths, a covert and competing narrative—a love story—subtly subverts the detective quest for a final, definitive solution. A novel by the renowned Fred Vargas, L’homme à l’envers [The Inside-Out Man], plays upon ancient fears of the werewolf legend, even as it engages contemporary questions of race, class and gender in a French context. Just as the text turns certain assumptions “inside out” (among them, the assumption that its author is a man), it also overturns literary as well as sociocultural conventions. Interspersed among our novels will be several short stories from Maurice Leblanc’s collection, Les Huit coups de l’horloge [The Clock Strikes Eight], published in 1923. Through these accounts of Prince Rénine’s efforts to entertain and seduce a young lady by involving her in his detective pursuits, we will study the France of a bygone era. And of course, we could not conclude the semester without admiring the prowess of renowned Belgian writer Georges Simenon’s immortal Commissaire Maigret! All reading, written work and class discussion will be in French. Final grades will be based on active class participation ; short response papers ; an oral presentation ; a short essay ; a midterm exam ; and the choice of either a final exam or a longer paper.

FRIT F399: Reading for Honors (1-12 cr.)

Number Day/Time Instructor
6040 Arranged Massimo Scalabrini

For students preparing an honors project to receive a degree with departmental honors in French, see our honors page, here.

FRIT F401: Structure & Development of French (3 cr.)

Number Days Time Room Instructor
6041 TR 9:30-10:45 BH 141 Barbara Vance

This class provides CASE S&H credits

Prerequisite: F313 or F314, or consent of instructor.

In this course we will look at the French language from a very broad perspective, investigating its structure from a linguistic point of view (that is, descriptively and scientifically) and concerning ourselves with how French arose historically and with its many modern forms (not only the ‘standard’ European language but geographical and social varieties of all kinds). How did French develop from spoken Latin and what did it look like 1000 years ago? How have the various regional and world dialects of French arisen, and what continues to make each of them unique today? What is the relationship between French and languages with which it is in close contact, such as Breton, Occitan, or Creole? Finally, how do individuals vary their use of French according to social situations, and how do speakers continue to innovate, making French – like all living languages -- a continually evolving form of expression?

FRIT F450: Culture & Society in French Studies (3 cr.)
Vivre c'est choisir: Life in France during WWII
Oana Panaïté

Number Days Time Room Instructor
31021 TR 1:00-2:15 BH 137 Oana Panaïté

This class fulfills CASE A&H credit and CASE Global Civ & Culture credit

Ce cours sera consacré aux dilemmes politiques, moraux et intimes qui ont dominé la vie des Français et des Françaises pendant la Seconde Guerre mondiale. Comment vit-on dans un pays vaincu de manière foudroyante pendant l’été 1940, dont la moitié est occupée par l’armée allemande et l’autre moitié se trouve sous la férule de la dictature de Vichy ? Le pays est divisé entre les Collaborationnistes qui profitent de la guerre pour avancer leur propres intérêts personnels et politiques, les Résistants, pour qui les choix politiques sont inséparables des sacrifices personnels, et la majorité du peuple qui pratique diverses formes de résistance passive. Pour comprendre la complexité de la vie pendant cette période cruciale de l’histoire de France, nous lirons des textes littéraires et historiques et nous regarderons des films et des épisodes de séries télévisées portant sur cette époque et sur son influence en France et ailleurs (dans l’empire colonial français et aux États-Unis).

FRIT F467: French Beyond the Hexagon--2nd 8 weeks only (3 cr.)
Postcolonial Writing in Africa and the Caribbean
(Écriture postcoloniale en Afrique et aux Antilles)
Eileen Julien

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
31023TR4:00-6:30BH 333Eileen Julien

We will begin by considering the term Francophone and the diverse regions “beyond the Hexagon.” Spanning the period of the 1940s to 2010, the course will then take up a range of issues, relevant to cultural production and literature: the use of French language, creoles and African languages; mythologies of Africa; emigration and immigration; postcoloniality and the Antilles’s status as départements d’outre-mer; memory and history; gender and identity.

Our focus will be primarily the Antilles, and we will read as many of the following as is manageable in an eight-weeks course, with an eye to both formal and thematic elements: Aimé Césaire’s brilliant surrealist poem, Cahier d'un retour au pays natal and his 1960s rewriting of Shakespeare, Une tempête; Joseph Zobel’s and Euzhan Palcy’s coming of age story, Rue Cases-Nègres (novel and film respectively), Simone Schwarz-Bart’s lyrical play about a Haitian immigrant in Guadeloupe, Ton beau capitaine; Maryse Condé’s Moi, Tituba sorcière de Salem, a sometimes raucous "post-modern," "magical realist" take on colonial Salem; Dany Laferrière's memoir of the Haitian earthquake of 2010, Tout bouge autour de moi--Laferrière will be visiting campus in April--and Frantz Fanon's critique of the bourgeois class, “Mésaventures de la conscience nationale,” which we will study alongside Xala, the film by Senegalese filmmaker Sembène Ousmane.

FRIT X471: French Conversation Group Leadership (1 cr.)

Number Day/Time Instructor
15193 Arranged Kelly Sax

Note: Contact Kelly Sax for permission to enroll in the course.

Under the guidance of their instructor, advanced students of French facilitate weekly French conversation groups for lower level students. Leaders are responsible for planning all group sessions, including discussion topics generated by magazine/newspaper articles and movies, and activities such as games and cooking. No credit for French major. May be repeated for a total of 4 credit hours.

FRIT X490: Individual Readings in French (3 cr.)

Number Day/Time Instructor
6044 Arranged Massimo Scalabrini

Independent study on a specific topic not taught in one of this semester's regular courses. If interested, complete the permission form.

FRIT F492: Reading French for Graduate Students (4 cr.)

Number Days Time Room Instructor
6042 TR 7:15-8:45 pm
(undergrad)
GA 003 Staff
6043 TR 7:15-8:45 pm
(grad)
GA 003 Staff

Prerequisite: F491 or consent of department. Open with consent of the instructor to undergraduates who have already completed the B.A. language requirement in another language.

Continuation of language and reading development from F491. Credit given for only one of F492 or any of the following: F150, F169, F200, F205, or F219.

FRIT F499: Reading for Honors (1-6 cr.)

Number Day/Time Instructor
6045 Arranged Massimo Scalabrini

For students preparing an honors project to receive a degree with departmental honors in French, see our honors page, here.

Italian Courses

FRIT M100: Elementary Italian I (4 cr.)

Monday, Wednesday, Friday Hybrid Classes

Number Days Time Room Instructor
6051 MWF 11:15-12:05 GA 0005 Anna Love
6053 MWF 1:25-2:15 GA 005 Rosa Borgonovi
6054 MWF 12:20-1:10 GA 005 Anna Love

Online Class

Number Instructor Notes
6050 Anna Love Online meetings

Note: Contact the Director of Language Instruction for Italian, Professor Karolina Serafin, for permission to enroll in the above online class.

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Introduction to contemporary Italian language, geography, and culture. Involves a broad variety of assignments and activities that develop grammatical competency and proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Cultural topics and simple cultural comparisons are introduced. Credit given for only one of the following: M100, M110, M115, or M491.

Hybrid course: This is a computer enhanced course, which is a combination of traditional classroom time and online instruction. The course meets in class three days a week and involves independent work by students, a portion of which will be performed online. During the semester, students perform a variety of tasks to practice speaking, writing, listening and reading in a cultural context. The grammar focuses on present and simple past tense, allowing the students to speak and write in simple sentences about familiar topics with accuracy and fluency, employing basic conversational strategies.

Online Class: This beginning Italian course is interactive and conducted completely online. The students do not need to be on campus in order to participate. It requires students to work independently and follow a very structured syllabus. The class meets with the instructor online once a week; meeting hours are flexible. The students are involved in a variety of online tasks such as reading, listening, completing exercises, posting writing assignments and recording responses. All the activities are integrated into a larger cultural context. The grammar focuses on present and simple past tense, allowing the students to speak and write in simple sentences about familiar topics with accuracy and fluency, employing basic conversational strategies.

Check our online courses page for more info!

FRIT M115: Accelerated Elementary Italian (4 cr.)

Number Days Time Room Instructor
6055 MTWR 11:15-12:05 WH 202 Karolina Serafin

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: Obtain authorization from department.

This intensive beginning course covers the material of two semesters in one (M100 & M150). The course meets four times a week and also involves independent work by students, a portion of which will be performed online. During the semester students are involved in a variety of tasks practicing speaking, writing, listening and reading in a cultural context. The grammar focuses on present, past and future tenses, allowing the students to speak and write in simple sentences about familiar topics with accuracy and fluency. The course is fast-paced it and very rewarding. It is recommended for students with previous experience learning foreign languages (specifically Romance languages). If interested, please fill out the online authorization form.

If you have any trouble with the form or have additional questions please email us at the Department of French and Italian and we can help you.

FRIT M150: Elementary Italian II (4 cr.)

Monday, Wednesday, Friday

Number Days Time Room Instructor
6056 MWF 10:10-11:00 FQ 012B Carlotta Vacchelli
6057 MWF 11:15-12:05 BH 229 Luisa Gregori
8088 MWF 1:25-2:15 BH 237 Francesco Samarini
9347 MWF 9:05-9:55 BH 236 Luisa Gregori

Monday, Wednesday, Thursday

Number Days Time Room Instructor
6059 MWR 8:00-8:50 SY 137 Carlotta Vacchelli

Monday, Wednesday evenings

6060 MW 7:15-8:45 SY 137 Pietro Tripano

Online Class

Number Instructor Notes
6058 Karolina Serafin Online meetings

Note: Contact the Director of Language Instruction for Italian, Professor Karolina Serafin, for permission to enroll in the above online class.

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: M100.

Continued introduction to contemporary Italian language, geography, and culture. Involves a broad variety of assignments and activities that build grammatical competency and proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Practice with new cultural topics and basic cultural analysis. Credit given for only one of the following: M110, M115, M150, or M491.

Hybrid Class: This is a computer enhanced course, which is a combination of traditional classroom time and online instruction. The course meets three days a week and involves independent work by students, a portion of which will be performed online. This course follows M100 and continues to present the beginning-level concepts of Italian language and culture. During the semester students perform a variety of tasks to practice speaking, writing, listening and reading in a cultural context. The grammar focuses on past and future tense, allowing the students to speak and write in simple sentences with accuracy and fluency about familiar topics.

Online Class: This second-semester Italian course is interactive and conducted completely online. The students do not need to be on campus in order to participate. It requires students to work independently and follow a very structured syllabus. The class meets with the instructor online once a week; meeting hours are flexible. The students are involved in a variety of online tasks such as reading, listening, completing exercises, posting writing assignments and recording responses. All the activities are integrated into a larger cultural context. The grammar focuses on past and future tense, allowing the students to speak and write in simple sentences about familiar topics with accuracy and fluency.

FRIT M200: Intermediate Italian I (3 cr.)

Monday, Wednesday, Friday

Number Days Time Room Instructor
11165 MWF 1:25-2:15 BH 206 Luisa Gregori

Online Class

Number Instructor Notes
6061 Leo Cabrini Online meetings

Note: Contact the Director of Language Instruction, Professor Karolina Serafin, for permission to enroll in the above online course section.

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: M110, M115, M150, or equivalent.

This course is a continuation of Elementary Italian II. In class the students concentrate on reviewing and refining structures learned at the 100-level, but this time at an intermediate level. During the semester students are involved in a variety of tasks practicing speaking, writing, listening and reading in cultural context. The course features study of original Italian short movies that offer the first stimulus for learning intermediate-level vocabulary, grammar and culture. Credit given for only one of M200 or M215.

Online Class: This Intermediate I Italian course is interactive and conducted completely online. The students do not need to be on campus in order to participate. It requires students to work independently and follow a very structured syllabus. The class meets with the instructor online once a week; meeting hours are flexible. The students are involved in a variety of online tasks at the intermediate level, such as reading, listening, completing exercises, posting writing assignments and recording responses. All the activities are integrated into a larger cultural context. The grammar reviews all the material learned in previous courses in an intermediate context and increases skills by adding more intermediate structures and vocabulary.

FRIT M215: Accelerated Second-Year Italian (4 cr.)

Number Days Time Room Instructor
10269 MTWR 1:25-2:15 WH 202 Karolina Serafin

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: M115 or equivalent (M100 and M150), and permission from department.

This intensive intermediate-level Italian course covers the material of two semesters in one (M200 & M250). The course builds upon the first three semesters of beginning Italian (or equivalent) adding the unique feature of short films as the first stimulus for learning intermediate-level vocabulary, grammar, and cultural concepts. The various activities aim to strengthen proficiency in listening, speaking, reading and writing, and students will gain the ability to understand, evaluate, compare, and appreciate many aspects of Italian culture. The course is fast-paced and very rewarding. It is recommended for students with previous experience learning foreign languages (specifically Romance languages). Students must be recommended for this course by their Italian instructor in M150, M110 or M115, or arrange to meet with Dr. Karolina Serafin to obtain permission. Credit given for only one of the following: M215 or M200-M250.

FRIT M222: Topics in Italian Culture
Food/Family in Italian-American Culture

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
30957T2:30-3:45WH 002Colleen Ryan

This class provides CASE A&H, CASE Global Civ & Culture, and GenEd A&H, GenEd World Cultures credits

Meatballs, mothers, and mafia? Maybe! Nearly 18 million Italian Americans comprise about 6% of America’s population. For decades, Italian American writers, directors, and artists have represented their cross-cultural identity in ways that reflect the joys, conflicts and social concerns of this (our fifth largest) heritage group. To no surprise, food is often central to their narratives about immigration, ethnic identity, and assimilation and fuels the commonplaces and stereotypes that this course aims to contest. From Mario Puzo to Francis Ford Coppola, from Dean Martin to Lady Gaga, from Helen Barolini to Nancy Savoca, and Martin Scorsese to Tony Soprano, we question the myths surrounding Italian families, sexual mores, and socio-political views as represented by Italian American literature, film, theater, and television in this country.

FRIT M222: Topics in Italian Culture--2nd 8 weeks only
Cultures of the Italian Renaissance

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
32551TR4:00-6:30BH 148Massimo Scalabrini

This class provides CASE A&H, CASE Global Civ & Culture, and GenEd A&H, GenEd World Cultures credits

The aim of this course is to provide a clear and comprehensive picture of what the Italian Renaissance was. We will first try to understand historically the core event of the Renaissance--the rediscovery and conscious imitation of ancient Greek and Latin languages, literatures, and cultural artifacts--and we will then analyze the ways in which this rebirth fundamentally changed the languages, literatures, arts, philosophies and politics of Italy at the dawn of the modern era. A key concern will be to demonstrate that while the Renaissance was ‘elitist’ in that only a few highly educated people could engage in this revolution, it produced far reaching consequences in the way we speak, read, write and study languages, literatures and cultures. Students will write two short essays, take six quizzes and a final exam.

FRIT M236: Dante's Divine Comedy (3 cr.)

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
15883TR1:00-2:15BH 015H. Wayne Storey

This class provides CASE A&H, CASE Global Civ & Culture, and GenEd A&H, GenEd World Cultures credits

A work devoted to justice, the critique of governments that are stymied by the self-interest of their citizens, and a political righteousness that shows neither favoritism nor mercy, Dante’s influential masterpiece of retribution and salvation teaches us to reflect upon the history of Florence, its art, economics, civic and religious reform, and ethics from the point of view of a writer who has been unjustly exiled and has a divine vision of the afterlife and the inhabitants of Hell, Purgatory and Paradise. The course includes readings from Dante’s fellow citizen Dino Compagni’s unfinished and suppressed chronicle of Florence and examines how Dante’s culture lays the groundwork for modern Italy.

FRIT M250: Intermediate Italian II (3 cr.)

Number Days Time Room Instructor
6063 MWF 10:10-11:00 BH 332 Marzia Bagnasco
6064 MWF 1:25-2:15 BH 238 Alicia Vitti
6065 MWF 11:15-12:05 BH 015 Alicia Vitti

Online Class

Number Instructor Notes
17777 Lino Mioni Online meetings
Thurs. either 9:30-10:45 am or 7:15-8:30 pm

Note: Contact the Director of Language Instruction for Italian, Professor Karolina Serafin, for permission to enroll in the above online class.

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: M200 or equivalent.

This second-year Italian course meets three times a week and builds upon the first three semesters of beginning and intermediate Italian (or equivalent). In M250, students concentrate on learning how to express their ideas and debate the pros and cons of certain situations as well as to offer advice and express opinions on a variety of familiar subjects, all in the Italian language. The students are involved in a variety of tasks practicing speaking, writing, listening and reading in a cultural context. The course includes study of original Italian short movies that offer the first stimulus for learning intermediate-level vocabulary, grammar and culture.

Online Class: This Intermediate II Italian course is interactive and conducted completely online. The students do not need to be on campus in order to participate. It requires students to work independently and follow a very structured syllabus. The class meets with the instructor online once a week; meeting hours are flexible. The students are involved in a variety of online tasks at the intermediate level, such as reading, listening, completing exercises, posting writing assignments and recording responses. All the activities are integrated into a larger cultural context. The grammar focuses on intermediate level structures, such as subjunctives.

FRIT M301: Italian Reading & Expression (4 cr.)

Number Days Time Room Instructor
8001 MTWRF 10:10-11:00am SY 137 Alicia Vitti & Leo Cabrini

Prerequisite: M250 or consent of instructor.

This Spring immerse yourself in Italian culture. Read, analyze, and discuss texts from a variety of sources: from the main literary genres to song lyrics and online blogs. Watch Italian movies, follow Italian news, and interpret a variety of Italian art works while improving your grammar and ability to speak, write, read, and listen. Get passionate about Italian culture in its many forms!

FRIT M305: Civiltà Italiana Moderna (3 cr.)
The Best of Today's Italian Cinema
Antonio Vitti

Number Days Time Room Instructor
31171 TR 9:30-10:45 BH 238 Antonio Vitti

This class provides CASE A&H, CASE Global Civ & Culture credits

Prerequisite: M300 or M301 or consent of instructor.

This course will study the most diverse and extensive lineup of contemporary Italian films available by striking a balance between emerging talents and esteemed veterans, including the acclaimed documentary Fuocoammare by Gianfranco Rosi, about the Mediterranean refugee crisis, and the final work from the late cult director Claudio Caligari (Don’t Be Bad, Italy’s submission for the 2015 Best Foreign Language Oscar). In memory of Ettore Scola, who passed away this year, the course includes his brilliant Ugly, Dirty and Bad, in a beautiful new digital restoration. We will study both commercial and independent films, ranging from a vérité documentary to a superhero movie, outrageous comedies to gripping dramas. Experience the best of today’s Italian cinema at IU – in Italian!

Above class has optional film showings Tuesday evenings from 7:15 to 10pm in Wylie Hall 015. Students must view films before Thursday’s class meeting.

FRIT M311: Italian film and culture (3 cr.)
Fellini: Realism to Fantasy
Joint listed with MSCH-F 398 (class 9081) and EURO-W 406 (class 14520)
Antonio Vitti

Number Days Time Room Instructor
12661 TR 11:15-12:30 BH 139 Antonio Vitti

This class provides CASE A&H, CASE Global Civ & Culture credits

M311 is in English

This course will study Federico Fellini's early films before he became a larger-than-life maestro and Italy's synonym for cinema. Special attention will be given to his early career; Fellini was both a screenwriter for neorealist pioneer Roberto Rossellini and a newspaper caricaturist in postwar Rome. We will start with his first film made with Lattuada: Luci del varietà, a collaboration that he later used for his 1963 masterpiece 8 ½ which will also be included in this course. Lo sceicco bianco, Amore in città, I vitelloni will be studied from a new perspective. Fellini broke away from neorealism with La strada, and from there we will follow his obsessions with the circus, societal decadence, spiritual redemption, and controversial construction of women in films such as Nights of Cabiria and La dolce vita. The course will conclude with Amarcord, Fellini's memories of his childhood in Fascist Italy and La voce della luna, Fellini's reflection on modern life. Che strano chiamarsi Federico by Ettore Scola, an affectionate tribute to his friend and Maestro will be our first screening. The course will include interviews with Fellini.

*In this course we will explore the most important works of Federico Fellini. We will investigate the films’ cultural impact, critical reception, and visual and narrative innovations – and the cultural and collaborative context behind the films, including neorealism, popular theater, vaudeville, caricature and spiritualism. We will screen the most significant of his 24 films, read informative articles, interviews and essays that exemplify the major theoretical orientation associated with Fellini’s films from the 1950s until his death. Coursework entails short critical essays, oral presentations and a final project combining critical and creative work

Above class has optional film showings Thursday evenings from 7:15 to 10pm in Wylie Hall 015. Students must view films before Tuesday’s class meeting.

FRIT M453: 20th Century Italian Literature & Culture (3 cr.)
Virtue and Violence: Italian Women Writers of the 20th and 21st Centuries
Colleen Ryan

Number Days Time Room Instructor
31175 TR 1:00-2:15 BH 105 Colleen Ryan

This class provides CASE A&H credits

Prerequisite: M305, M306, M307, M308, M390 or consent of instructor.

Who are some of the most well known Italian women writers of our times? What do they have to say about life and society, about identity and art? Are there lesser-known but equally poignant women writers whose voices may be overshadowed or forgotten? Our study departs from what is the first feminist novel in Italy (A Woman) to then visit the voices that emerge from selections of poetry, theater, short stories, novels, and films throughout the 20th century and up to recent years (Tamaro, Ferrante, Mazzantini). We will connect close readings of each text with the socio-historical contexts it depicts or in which it was written. Analyses and discussions will focus on (1) continuity and change in the concepts of virtue and violence with regard to women, and (2) similarities and differences in the writers’ styles, themes, and messages.

FRIT X493: Individual Readings in Italian Literature (1-3 cr.)

Number Day/Time Instructor
6066 Arranged Massimo Scalabrini

Independent study on a specific topic not taught in one of this semester's regular courses. If interested, complete the permission form.

FRIT M499: Reading for Honors (3 cr.)

Number Day/Time Instructor
6067 Arranged Massimo Scalabrini

For students preparing an honors project to receive a degree with departmental honors in Italian.

Interdisciplinary Courses

HON H 233: Great Authors, Composers & artists (3 cr.)
The Pen & the Paintbrush
Nicolas Valazza

Number Days Time Room Instructor
16504 TR 4:00-5:15 HU 108 Nicolas Valazza

The purpose of this course is to explore the relationship between painting and literature from an interdisciplinary perspective (literary, art historical and philosophical), while developing a critical approach that questions the connections and discrepancies between text and image throughout history. Literature and painting have often been considered “sister arts,” even though their relationship has been characterized by rivalry as much as solidarity. Since Plato and the exclusion of “artists” from his Republic, painters and writers have struggled to assert their respective arts among the liberal ones. But while poetry was integrated earlier into humanist education, thanks to its discursive and “intellectual” nature, painting had to wait until the Italian Renaissance to get rid of its connotation as a mere mechanical art, and thus acquire its liberal status. Furthermore, only by comparing itself to the “intellectual” dignity of poetry, did painting succeed in surpassing its former status. Since the Renaissance, painters and poets have, on the one hand, fraternized with each other to promote the complementarity of both arts while, on the other hand, struggling to assert the superiority of their own art.

In this course, we will read and analyze several key texts that retrace the ambivalent relationship between painting and literature from antiquity to modern times. Beginning with the section of Plato’s Republic condemning the arts of imitation, as well as the section of Aristotle’s Poetics that conversely praises them, we will then examine Pliny’s and Ovid’s legendary tales about painters, which define many characteristics of the figure of the artist as s/he is still conceived nowadays. We will next devote our class meetings to the emergence of art theory in the Italian Renaissance, by reading excerpts from writings by artists (Alberti, Leonardo da Vinci, Vasari) who claimed the intellectual status of painting (what Leonardo calls “cosamentale”: “a thing of the mind”). It will be interesting to see how this “liberalization” of painting was achieved by way of comparing it to poetry and other liberal arts, including geometry and astronomy. In order to become familiar with critical concepts of modern aesthetics (such as the “sublime” and the “relativity of beauty”), we will then read selected texts by 18th-century philosophers, artists and art critics (Kant, Burke, Hume, Diderot, Richardson, Hogarth, Reynolds, etc.). Lastly, we will explore the figure of the painter as a fictional character, as he appears in several short stories and novels: Balzac’s The Unknown Masterpiece, Gautier’s The Golden Fleece, Huysmans’ Against the Grain and Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray; as well as in film adaptations of these narratives. When possible, as a base for the critical reflection on the comparison between text and image, readings will be supported by visual examples taken from painters mentioned or implied in the literature.

Students will be required to write a response paper on the readings every two weeks, to make an oral presentation in class, to write a mid-term composition, and to develop a personal research project, leading to a final paper.

HON H 234: Literature of Time and Place
Global Perspectives in 20th and 21st Century Science Fiction
(3 cr.)
Above class open to Hutton Honors College students only
Marco Arnaudo

Fulfills GenEd A&H credit, CASE A&H Breadth of Inquiry credit requirement

Number Days Time Room Instructor
12218 TR 1:00-2:15 HU 108 Marco Arnaudo

Science fiction is often thought of as a genre mainly concerned with imaginary worlds. In truth, science-fiction has been used by its authors to discuss important issues related to the present. In our class, we will read texts of sci-fi that will allow us to explore themes related to globalism, interconnectedness, amalagamation, hybridazation, polyphony, cultural relativism, post-colonialism, post-nationalism, virtual communities, and imaginary communities. The class will employ sci-fi as a platform to investigate these topics in an analysis of their ethical and political aspects.

COLL C103 Critical Approaches: Arts & Humanities (3 cr.)
Cloak & Dagger
Marco Arnaudo

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
12294MW1:25-2:15JH A100Marco Arnaudo
12304 R 1:25-2:15 BH 332 discussion
12302 R 2:30-3:20 BH 235 discussion
12303 R 3:35-4:25 BH 335 discussion
13631 F 12:20-1:10 BH 247 discussion
13629 F 1:25-2:15 BH 247 discussion
13630 F 2:30-3:20 BH 247 discussion

Fulfills the CASE Critical Approaches requirement, IUB GenEd A&H credit, CASE A&H Breadth of Inquiry credit

This course introduces students to one of the most basic concepts of literary criticism - literary genres - with specific reference to a popular genre such as the so-called "thriller." "Thriller" is a term that came into use in the late nineteenth century and was applied not only to the detective story, the most famous examples of which were A. Conan Doyle's tales about Sherlock Holmes, but also to a closely related literary genre, the spy novel, that also attained great popularity during the period.

The primary focus of this course will be to teach students how to understand the conventions and traditions that govern any literary genre, with specific reference to the "thriller" as exemplified by selected detective and spy stories in both literature and film. Attention will be paid to critical concepts such as style, form, structure, point of view, and implied reader, in order to provide students with analytical tools that will be valuable in the years to come. It is my hope that students will apply the lessons they learn about genre in this class to any literary genre, not only genres typical of popular culture.

Readings will include the detective fiction of Poe, Conan Doyle, Agatha Christie, Raymond Chandler, and Friedrich Dürrenmatt. We will also examine several detective-mystery movies, including the recent Sherlock Holmes (2009), and the classic masterpieces of the noir tradition, including The Maltese Falcon and The Big Sleep. For the spy genre, we will read the pre-Cold War novel A Coffin for Dimitrios, a James Bond novel by Ian Fleming, and a Cold War spy novel by John Le Carré. In addition, we will screen two very different James Bond films: one made during the height of the Cold War, and Martin Campbell's Casino Royale (2006).



Summer 2017

First Six-Week Session
Tuesday, May 9–Friday, June 16

**FRIT F100: Elementary French I (4 cr.)
**CANCELED

NumberDaysTimesInstructor
**8066Online meetings onlyN/A**CANCELED

Please submit the form here for permission to enroll in the above 100% online class. See our Online Courses page ("About Online Courses" tab) for more information.

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Introduction to French language and selected aspects of French civilization and culture. Credit given for only one of F100, F115, or F491.

FRIT F200: Second-Year French I: Language and Culture (3 cr.)

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
4175MTWRF11:00-12:15BH 148Jill Owen

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: F150 or equivalent. Grammar, composition, conversation coordinated with the study of cultural texts. Credit given for only one of the following third-semester courses: F200, or F265.

FRIT F250: Second-Year French II: Language and Culture (3 cr.)
**CANCELED

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
**4176MTWRF12:45-2:00N/A**CANCELED

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: F200 or equivalent. Grammar, composition, conversation coordinated with the study of cultural texts. Credit given for only one of the following fourth-semester courses: F250, or F265.

FRIT X490: Individual Readings in French (1-3 cr.)

NumberDay/TimeInstructor
4182Arrangedvariable

Independent study on a specific topic not taught in one of the department's regular courses. If interested, complete the permission form and bring it to the office area in GISB 3169. You may also scan and email the completed form to the department.

FRIT F491: Elementary French for Graduate Students (3-4 cr.)

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructorNotes
4178MTWRF11:00-12:15BH 209Jessica Tindiraundergraduate students (4 cr.)
4179MTWRF11:00-12:15BH 209Jessica Tindiragraduate students (3 cr.)

Although this course is designed for graduate students who seek to develop reading knowledge of French, it is also open to undergraduate students. However, it will not count toward the French major or minor, and it will not count toward fulfilling the undergraduate language requirement. The course provides an introduction to structures of the language necessary for reading, followed by reading in graded texts of a general nature. Credit given for only one of F491 or any French course at the 100-level.

FRIT M100: Elementary Italian I (4 cr.)

NumberInstructorNotesTime
7833Rosa BorgonoviOnline course meetingsMW 9:30-10:45am
OR MW 6:00-7:15pm
**8210n/a**CANCELEDMW 9:30-10:45am
OR MW 6:00-7:15pm

See our Online Courses page ("About Online Courses" tab) for more information.

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Introduction to contemporary Italian language, geography, and culture. Involves a broad variety of assignments and activities that develop grammatical competency and proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Cultural topics and simple cultural comparisons are introduced. Credit given for only one of the following: M100, M110, M115, or M491.

This beginning Italian course is interactive and conducted completely online. The students do not need to be on campus in order to participate. It requires students to work independently and follow a very structured syllabus. The students are involved in a variety of online tasks such as reading, listening, completing exercises, posting writing assignments and recording responses. All the activities are integrated into a larger cultural context. The grammar focuses on present and simple past tense, allowing the students to speak and write in simple sentences about familiar topics with accuracy and fluency, employing basic conversational strategies.

FRIT M200: Intermediate Italian I (3 cr.)

NumberInstructorNotesTime
7986Marzia BagnascoOnline courseTR 9:30-10:45am
OR TR 6:00-7:15pm

Please contact Professor Karolina Serafin for permission to enroll in the above online class. See our Online Courses page ("About Online Courses" tab) for more information.

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: M110, M115, M150, or equivalent.

This intermediate Italian course is interactive and conducted completely online. The students concentrate on reviewing and refining structures learned at the 100-level, but this time at an intermediate level. During the semester students are involved in a variety of tasks practicing speaking, writing, listening and reading in cultural context. The course features study of original Italian short movies that offer the first stimulus for learning intermediate-level vocabulary, grammar and culture. Credit given for only one of M200 or M215.

FRIT X493: Individual Readings in Italian Literature (1-3 cr.)

NumberDay/TimeInstructor
4188Arrangedvariable

Independent study on a specific topic not taught in one of the department's regular courses. If interested, complete the permission form and bring it to the office area in GISB 3169. You may also scan and email the completed form to the department.

Second Six-Week Session
Monday, June 19–Friday, July 28

FRIT F150: Elementary French II: Language and Culture (4 cr.)

NumberDaysTimesInstructor
8365Online meetings onlyMW 9:30-10:45am
OR MW 6:00-7:15pm
Jacob Ladyga

Please submit the form here for permission to enroll in the above 100% online class. See our Online Courses page ("About Online Courses" tab) for more information.

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: F100. Basic structures of the French language and selected topics of French civilization and culture. Credit given for only one of the following: F115, F150, or F491.

FRIT F250: Second-Year French II: Language and Culture (3 cr.)

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
4177MTWRF12:45-2:00WH 009Leila El-Murr

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: F200 or equivalent. Grammar, composition, conversation coordinated with the study of cultural texts. Credit given for only one of the following fourth-semester courses: F250, or F265.

FRIT X490: Individual Readings in French (1-3 cr.)

NumberDay/Time
4183Arranged

Independent study on a specific topic not taught in one of the department's regular courses. If interested, complete the permission form and bring it to the office area in GISB 3169. You may also scan and email the completed form to the department.

FRIT F492: Reading French for Graduate Students (3-4 cr.)

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructorNotes
4180MTWRF11:00-12:15BH 209Renata Uzzellundergraduate students (4 cr.)
4181MTWRF11:00-12:15BH 209Renata Uzzellgraduate students (3 cr.)

Prerequisite: F491 or consent of department. Although this course is designed for graduate students who seek to develop reading knowledge of French, it is also open to undergraduate students. However, it will not count toward the French major or minor, and it will not count toward fulfilling the undergraduate language requirement. The course includes a continuation of language and reading development from F491.

FRIT M150: Elementary Italian II (4 cr.)

NumberInstructorNotesTime
7985Carlotta VacchelliOnline courseMW 9:30-10:45am
OR MW 6:00-7:15pm

Please contact Professor Karolina Serafin for permission to enroll in the above online class. See our Online Courses page ("About Online Courses" tab) for more information.

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: M100.

Continued introduction to contemporary Italian language, geography, and culture. Involves a broad variety of assignments and activities that build grammatical competency and proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Practice with new cultural topics and basic cultural analysis. Credit given for only one of the following: M110, M115, M150, or M491.

This second-semester Italian course is interactive and conducted completely online. The students do not need to be on campus in order to participate. It requires students to work independently and follow a very structured syllabus. The students are involved in a variety of online tasks such as reading, listening, completing exercises, posting writing assignments and recording responses. All the activities are integrated into a larger cultural context. The grammar focuses on past and future tense, allowing the students to speak and write in simple sentences about familiar topics with accuracy and fluency.

FRIT M250: Intermediate Italian II (3 cr.)

NumberInstructorNotesTime
7987Francesco SamariniOnline courseTR 9:30-10:45am
OR TR 6:00-7:15pm

Please contact Professor Karolina Serafin for permission to enroll in the above online class. See our Online Courses page ("About Online Courses" tab) for more information.

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: M200 or equivalent.

This second-year Italian course is conducted entirely online and builds upon the first three semesters of beginning and intermediate Italian (or equivalent). In M250, students concentrate on learning how to express their ideas and debate the pros and cons of certain situations as well as to offer advice and express opinions on a variety of familiar subjects, all in the Italian language. The students are involved in a variety of tasks practicing speaking, writing, listening and reading in a cultural context. The course includes study of original Italian short movies that offer the first stimulus for learning intermediate-level vocabulary, grammar and culture.

FRIT X493: Individual Readings in Italian Literature (1-3 cr.)

NumberDay/TimeInstructor
4189Arrangedvariable

Independent study on a specific topic not taught in one of the department's regular courses. If interested, complete the permission form and bring it to the office area in GISB 3169. You may also scan and email the completed form to the department.



French Courses

FRIT F100: Elementary French I (4 cr.)

Monday, Wednesday, Friday

Number Days Time Room Instructor Notes
2288 MWF 9:05-9:55 SB 138 Evie Munier Hybrid
2293 MWF 10:10-11:00 GA 0009 Rishani Merinnage de Costa Hybrid
2287 MWF 11:15-12:05 SW 103 Shawn Gasseling Hybrid
2289 MWF 11:15-12:05 RE C110 Apoorva Sarmal Hybrid
2290 MWF 12:20-1:10 SY 002 Billy Lebbs Hybrid
2291 MWF 1:25-2:15 SB 140 Shawn Gasseling Hybrid
2294 MWF 2:30-3:20 SB 220 Evie Munier Hybrid

Monday, Wednesday, Thursday

Number Days Time Room Instructor Notes
2285 MWR 8:00-8:50 BH 322 Rishani Merinnage de Costa Hybrid
2295 MWR 4:40-5:30 SB 231 Amber Panwitz &
Mark Black
Hybrid

Tuesday, Thursday

Number Days Time Room Instructor Notes
2286 TR 7:15-8:45 GA 0007 Chase Tiffany Traditional

Online Class

Number Instructor Notes
*2292 Amber Panwitz &
Mark Black
Online meetings on Tuesdays
either 11:15-12:30pm or 7:15-8:30pm

*Please submit the form here for permission to enroll in the above 100% online class. See our Online Courses page ("About Online Courses" tab) for more information about teaching and learning methods.

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Introduction to French language and selected aspects of French civilization and culture. Credit given for only one of F100, F115, or F491.

See textbook info here.(click on the "textbooks" tab on the top right)

FRIT F115: Accelerated Elementary French (4 cr.)

Number Days Time Room Instructor
2296 MTWR 10:10-11:00 SW 103 Jessica Tindira

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: Obtain authorization from department.

An accelerated treatment of material covered in both F100 and F150 designed for superior students and students with previous training in another foreign language. Credit given for only one of F115 and F100; Credit given for only one of F115 and F150. If interested, please fill out the online authorization form.

See textbook info here.(click on the "textbooks" tab on the top right)

FRIT F150: Elementary French II: Language and Culture (4 cr.)

Monday, Wednesday, Friday

Number Days Time Room Instructor Notes
2298 MWF 9:05-9:55 SB 131 Andrew Karsten hybrid
2301 MWF 10:10-11:00 BH 148 Alana Duncan hybrid
2299 MWF 11:15-12:05 BH 237 Alana Duncan hybrid
2302 MWF 1:25-2:15 SB 138 Andrew Karsten hybrid
2303 MWF 1:25-2:15 BH 231 Taylor MacDonald hybrid
2300 MWF 2:30-3:20 BH 231 Jill Owen hybrid

Monday, Wednesday, Thursday

Number Days Time Room Instructor Notes
2297 MWR 8:00-8:50 BH 331 Jessica Tindira Hybrid

Tuesday, Thursday

Number Days Time Room Instructor Notes
2305 TR 7:15-8:45 GA 0009 Ludovic Mompelat Traditional

Online Class

Number Instructor Notes
*2304 Jill Owen Online meetings on Thursdays
either 11:15-12:30pm or 7:15-8:30pm

*Please submit the form here for permission to enroll in the above 100% online class. See our Online Courses page ("About Online Courses" tab) for more information about teaching and learning methods.

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: F100.

Basic structures of the French language and selected topics of French civilization and culture. Credit given for only one of the following: F115, F150, or F491.

See textbook info here.(click on the "textbooks" tab on the top right)

FRIT F200: Second-Year French I: Language and Culture (3 cr.)

Monday, Wednesday, Friday

Number Days Time Room Instructor
2307 MWF 9:05-9:55 BH 240 Laura Demsey
2309 MWF 10:10-11:00 BH 147 Leila El-Murr
2308 MWF 11:15-12:05 SB 140 Jake Ladyga
2310 MWF 12:20-1:10 WH 005 Cris Robu
2311 MWF 1:25-2:15 WH 009 Cris Robu
2313 MWF 2:30-3:20 BH 222 Elizabeth Myers
2314 MWF 2:30-3:20 JH A105 Jake Ladyga

Monday, Wednesday, Thursday

Number Days Time Room Instructor
2312 MWR 4:40-5:30 SB 220 Elizabeth Myers

Evenings

Number Days Time Room Instructor
2315 MW 7:15-8:30 GA 0005 Yuanshuai Cui
2316 TR 7:15-8:30 GA 0005 Yuanshuai Cui

Online

Number Instructor Notes
*2306 Leila El-Murr Online meetings on Tuesdays
either 11:15-12:30pm or 7:15-8:30pm

*Please submit the form here for permission to enroll in the above 100% online class. See our Online Courses page ("About Online Courses" tab) for more information about teaching and learning methods.

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: F150 or equivalent.

Grammar, composition, conversation coordinated with the study of cultural texts. Credit given for only one of the following third-semester courses: F200 or F265.

See textbook info here.(click on the "textbooks" tab on the top right)

FRIT F226: French Society (3 cr.)
Seeing the World Through French Eyes

Number Days Time Room Instructor
30491 TR 2:30-3:45 BH 333 Oana Panaïté

This class provides IUB GenEd World Culture credit, IUB GenEd S&H credit, COLL (CASE)S&H Breadth of Inquiry Credit, and COLL (CASE) Global Civ & Culture credits

What are the fundamental French values? Is France a socialist country? Is there a "French lifestyle"? Do the French work less than the Americans? How do the French see their country's mission in the world? Is there a French "melting pot"? Why did the Charlie Hebdo attack happen and how did French people respond to it? What do the French think of American politics today?

This class will discuss a series of historical concepts and cultural examples that will help students understand French politics, business, international relations, everyday life, and Franco-American relations.

Work will include a class presentation by each student, 3 written essays, a mid-term exam and final portfolio project. Honors students will write a short critical paper to preface their portfolios.

Taught in English--No prerequisites

FRIT F250: Second-Year French II: Language and Culture (3 cr.)

Monday, Wednesday, Friday

Number Days Time Room Instructor
2318 MWF 9:05-9:55 SY 200 Aiko Okamoto-Macphail
2319 MWF 10:10-11:00 SB 220 Anemarie Calin
10884 MWF 10:10-11:00 BH 209 Martin Maillot
2320 MWF 12:20-1:10 JH A105 Renata Uzzell
2321 MWF 1:25-2:15 BH 240 Anemarie Calin
2322 MWF 2:30-3:20 GA 0007 Charlène Gilbert
2317 MWF 3:35-4:25 GA 0007 Charlène Gilbert

Evenings

Number Days Time Room Instructor
2323 MW 7:15-8:30 GA 0007 Martin Maillot

Online Class

Number Instructor Notes
*9985 Kate Bastin Online meetings on Thursdays
either 11:15-12:30pm or 7:15-8:30pm

*Please submit the form here for permission to enroll in the above 100% online class. See our Online Courses page ("About Online Courses" tab) for more information about teaching and learning methods.

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: F200 or equivalent.

Grammar, composition, conversation coordinated with the study of cultural texts. Credit given for only one of the following fourth-semester courses: F250 or F265.

See textbook info here.(click on the "textbooks" tab on the top right)

FRIT F300: Reading & Expression in French (3 cr.)

This class provides COLL A&H Breadth of Inquiry credit

Prerequisite: F250, F265, or consent of department.

Number Days Time Room Instructor Notes
2324 TR 9:30-10:45 SB 220 Jill Owen L’Encadrement, l’espace et l’identité dans la littérature francophone
2326 MWF 11:15-12:05 JH A105 Liz Hebbard La littérature française à l’opéra
6660 TR 1:00-2:15 AC C107 Vincent Bouchard L’Afrique de l’Ouest francophone
7109
Joint listed with THTR-T483
TR 11:15-12:30 FA 010 Alison Calhoun French Theater Workshop
2325
10361 (Hutton honors section)
TR 2:30-3:45 GA 0007 Nicolas Valazza Adultery and Betrayal - Adultères et Trahisons

Jill Owen

L’Encadrement, l’espace et l’identité dans la littérature francophone

Description et objectifs :

Dans la littérature en générale, on poursuit sans cesse la question de l’identité – d’un personnage, d’un narrateur, d’un auteur, d’un lecteur – qui veut souvent s’étendre à l’identité d’un peuple entier. Pour approfondir notre compréhension d’une identité, nous pouvons nous poser les questions suivantes :

  • Qu’est-ce qui comprend l’identité d’une personne ou d’un personnage?
  • Comment l’espace personnel de cette personne réfléchit-il cette identité?
  • Comment est-ce qu’un narrateur, un auteur ou un artiste emploie l’encadrement narratif pour mettre en relief l’espace et l’identité

Une façon de parvenir à une définition plus concrète de l’identité serait à travers l’espace de quelqu’un dont les objets représentent ce qui est plus important dans sa vie. Dans une tentative d’examiner ces questions, ce cours se concentrera sur l’encadrement du soi dans les textes francophones du Moyen Âge jusqu’à aujourd’hui. Nous explorerons la composition d’une identité à travers l’espace décrit dans le théâtre, le roman, la poésie, l’essai et la bande dessinée francophones.

Liz Hebbard

La littérature française à l'opéra

This course offers an introduction to French and Francophone literature via the study of literary texts and their adaptations to opera. The literary texts present a variety of genres (plays, short stories, poetry) and both literary texts and operas cover a wide chronological range extending from the 12th to the 21st century. Our approach to these works will consider class, gender, and power relations, focusing on how opera adaptations distill or elaborate the thematics present in the original text and how operas express these social dynamics musically. We will not only read libretti, but also watch opera productions and discuss compositional and stagecraft techniques used to convey space and narration on stage. Works studied include Le Mariage de Figaro (Beaumarchais / Mozart); Carmen (Prosper Mérimée / Georges Bizet); Salome (Oscar Wilde / Richard Strauss); and Pelléas et Mélisande (Maurice Maeterlinck / Claude Débussy). Graded assessments include an individual presentation, short writing assignments, collaborative annotation of works discussed, a midterm exam, and a final literary analysis paper. All classwork and written work will be conducted in French. No prior knowledge of music is assumed.

Vincent Bouchard

L’Afrique de l’Ouest francophone

Exploration historique et culturelle de l’Afrique de l'Ouest à travers les contes, les sculptures, les tableaux, les livres, les bandes dessinée, les films, les jeux vidéo, etc., qui décrivent la vie en français.

Alison Calhoun

French Theater Workshop: Joint with THTR-T483

The French Theater Workshop, taught entirely in French, will offer students an introduction to French and Francophone Studies using both traditional analytical approaches to literature and culture and acting techniques. The idea at the heart of this course is that the demands of learning and performing a literary text (not just a dramatic text, but any text from any genre) serve the pedagogical purposes both of language learning and close reading. Part of class meetings will be used to develop language and analytical skills in French, while each meeting will also involve experimenting with how acting techniques can help students read, understand, interpret, and convey their interpretation of the readings. Students will perform works throughout the semester.

Nicolas Valazza

Adultery and Betrayal - Adultères et trahisons

As evidenced by the story of Helen of Troy, which lead to the events recounted in Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey, adultery and betrayal are at the foundation of Western literature. While society has always condemned infidelity and disloyalty for undermining social cohesion, adultery and betrayal have proven to be inexhaustible sources of inspiration for novelists, poets and playwrights, to the point of creating a moral exception for literature, intended as a space of transgression. This course aims to question the meaning of this transgression through the reading of a selection of novels, verses and theatrical plays, from the medieval narrative of Tristan et Iseut, to Camus’ novella “La Femme adultère,” through a selection of Fables by La Fontaine, Racine’s tragedy Phèdre, Molière’s comedy Tartuffe and a selection of Contes by Maupassant. Student grades will be based on class preparation and participation (10%), a 10-minute oral presentation (20%), two compositions (30%), a mid-semester exam (20%) and a final essay (20%). The course will be conducted in French.

FRIT F305: Stage and Page (3 cr.)
**CANCELED

Number Days Time Room Instructor
**6794 **CANCELED

This class provides CASE A&H credits

Prerequisite: F300

Theatre and literature of ideas by authors from the classical tradition to the twenty-first century. Readings and discussion in French.

FRIT F306: Poetry and Novel (3 cr.)

Number Days Time Room Instructor
33618 TR 9:30-10:45 SB 231 Eric MacPhail

This class provides COLL A&H credits

Prerequisite: F300

This course is the sequel to F300 and we build on the skills acquired there to read poems and novels by French authors from the Middle Ages to the 20th century. We begin with the Arthurian romance Yvain by Chrétien de Troyes, which will be the subject of our first essay test. Then we will study a selection of lyric poems from Charles d’Orléans to Jean de La Fontaine and students will write a paper on the poem of their choice. Then we will read some stories by the Enlightenment philosopher Denis Diderot, followed by a test in class. Next we will discover the riches of 19th-century French poetry from Victor Hugo to Stéphane Mallarmé, and students will do an in-class presentation on the poem of their choice. We will conclude with a novel by the 20th-century author Françoise Sagan. The final exam will be on her novel, La Chamade.

FRIT F310: Francophone Culture--2nd 8 weeks only (3 cr.)
Black Paris
Above class joint-offered with CMLT-C 363, AAAD-A 304 and HON-H 303

Number Days Time Room Instructor
33601 TR 4:00-6:30 AD A151 Eileen Julien

This class provides COLL A&H, COLL Global Civ & Culture credits

As early as the 1800s, free New Orleanians of color journeyed to France, a country that seemed to offer them greater freedom. Since then, countless African Americans, including writers, musicians, visual artists, and performers, have made Paris (or France)--however temporarily—their home. By examining the lives and work of prominent 20th century figures such as our own David Baker, Josephine Baker, James Baldwin, Lois Mailou Jones, Claude McKay, Richard Wright, and their African, Caribbean, and French intellectual counterparts (Aimé Césaire, Jean Genêt, Paulette Nardal, Jean Paul Sartre, Léopold Senghor), we will consider the broad intellectual issues arising from this displacement:

  • the historical and cultural ties of New Orleans to the Caribbean and France
  • diaspora, exile, expatriation and cosmopolitanism
  • “African primitivism” and the jazz age
  • the Harlem Renaissance and the négritude movement
  • transnationalism
  • race and the performance of identity.

We will conclude with an examination of Paris as a diasporic crossroads today.

Enroll any way you choose!

  • FRIT-F 310, 33601
  • CMLT-C 363, 33570
  • AAAD-A 304, 33597
  • HON-H 303, 33646

FRIT F313: Advanced Grammar (3 cr.)

Number Days Time Room Instructor
2327 MWF 11:15-12:05 BH 333 Barbara Vance
2328 MWF 10:10-11:00 BH 319 Aiko Okamoto-Macphail

Prerequisite: F250

Barbara Vance

F313 builds students' understanding of advanced aspects of French grammar and their facility in applying this understanding to written and oral expression. We will supplement the text Contrastes (Rochat) with exercises (online and others) and compositions based on various materials from French and francophone everyday society, including e.g. cross-cultural studies, journalism, and film.

Aiko Okamoto-Macphail

This course has two aims of first offering a synthesis of French grammar you learned to date and second preparing you for the courses in French culture and civilization at the F300 and F400 levels. The textbook we use is the second edition of Contrastes with the on-line workbook.

Early in the semester, you will choose one topic from French or Francophone on-line newspapers that you would like to focus on, as well as the grammar points that you would most like to improve. Then you will follow that news, read the articles, and bring them to class so that we all can translate some extracts and write short reports while working on the grammar points. Homework will use the on-line workbook for Contrastes, and in class, we will do more problem solving and non-mechanical exercises that demand explanations and in-depth analysis of grammar, including, but is not limited to, translation exercises. We will treat grammar as one of several skills of living the French language.

FRIT F314: Creative and Critical Writing in French (3 cr.)

Number Days Time Room Instructor
12812 TR 1:00-2:15 BH 105 Margot Gray

In this introduction to creative and critical writing in French, our primary goal will be the development and improvement of writing skills through various short creative and critical pieces. Emphasis will be placed on field activity and engagement with the many resources offered by IU (French-inflected dramatic and musical productions, films, museum exhibits) as sources of inspiration, both creative and critical. Working on a smaller canvas, we will also try our hand at a variety of exercises—such as, for instance, the brief autobiography of an object; a stream-of-consciousness piece punctuated by fragmentary conversations overheard in a crowded campus café; a “first-time” reminiscence (first time being carded? First “R” movie? First kiss?). Highlighting the course will be a week working with French poet and short-story writer Alain Nouvel, who has taught IU students in the context of our study-abroad program in Aix-en-Provence, France.

FRIT F315: The Sounds and Rhythms of French (4 cr.)

Number Days Time Room Instructor Notes
2329 TR 11:15-12:05 SY 006 Kevin Rottet Lecture
2330 MW 11:15-12:05 FA 005 Scott Evans Drill
2331 MW 1:25-2:15 WH 205 Scott Evans Drill

French F315 has three objectives:

  • to learn about the sound system of French and its role in the grammar and vocabulary of the language, and also as a marker of social and geographical identity;
  • to improve students' pronunciation accuracy and oral fluency and to train them to evaluate their own pronunciation;
  • to develop students' communicative skills by practice in listening comprehension and conversational practice.

The focus will be on the pronunciation of Standard French, that is, the speech of the educated Parisian that serves as a model in the French speaking world. However, students will be introduced to salient features of other varieties of French. The course meets four times weekly: two lectures with the professor, and two practice sessions with an associate instructor. All components of the course are taught in French. Prerequisite is FRIT F 250 or equivalent. Students choose one of two drill sections and attend drill plus lecture.

FRIT F361: La France médièvale (jusqu'à 1500) (3 cr.)

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
33642MW4:00-5:15pmBH 105Liz Hebbard

This class provides COLL (CASE) A&H Breadth of Inquiry credit

Prerequisite: F300

This course serves as a general introduction to the cultural history of medieval France from the Carolingian Empire to 1500. We will move thematically, rather than chronologically, focusing each week on different aspects of social, political, philosophical, and religious life in medieval France. Our readings each week will feature secondary texts that offer broad perspectives paired with primary texts that highlight key figures and events in closer detail. Topics will include feudalism, courtly love, crusade ideology, kings and popes, medieval legal systems, trade and travel routes, marriage and inheritance, pilgrimage, manuscript culture and medieval book production, the building of gothic cathedrals, and the literary and legal use of the French language. Some attention will also be paid to the way the Middle Ages is represented (or misrepresented) in contemporary popular culture. All classwork and written work will be conducted in French.

FRIT F362: La France 1500-1800 (3 cr.)

Number Days Time Room Instructor
30493 TR 1:00-2:15 GY 436 Alison Calhoun

This class provides COLL (CASE) A&H Breadth of Inquiry and COLL (CASE) Global Civ & Culture credits

Prerequisite: F300

This course will introduce students to a cultural history of France from the Renaissance to the Revolution. We will draw from diverse artifacts from France’s rich history to study new forms of political power, sociability, and religious creeds, along with a variety of cultural phenomena that shaped national identity, popular culture, and daily life. A significant portion of the course will focus on building vocabulary, style, and expression in French, so that students improve their listening, speaking, and writing skills. Grades will be based on three exams, weekly mini-compositions, and two brief group presentations/discussion leading exercises. This course is appropriate for students aiming to widen their knowledge of French history and culture, improve their language skills, or both.

FRIT F375: Thèmes Littéraires et Culturels (3 cr.)
Topic: Mysteries of Love and Death

Number Days Time Room Instructor
6422 TR 2:30-3:45 SY 105 Margaret Gray

This class provides COLL (CASE) A&H Breadth of Inquiry credit, COLL (CASE) Global Civ & Culture credits

Prerequisite: F300 or equivalent.

Detective fiction, argued literary critic Tzvetan Todorov, dramatizes the activity at work in all efforts of interpretation; the detective pursuing an elusive truth enacts the quest engaged by any reader as s/he attempts to derive meaning from a text. This course proposes to test such a claim across a variety of French detective fictions. In novelist Sébastien Japrisot’s Piège pour Cendrillon [Trap for Cinderella] we will trace the engagement of various cultural myths, from the « Cinderella » fairy tale as published by Madame LePrince de Beaumont in the 18th century to the chic and glamour of the contemporary Riviera. Even as the text ironizes such myths, a covert and competing narrative—a love story—subtly subverts the detective quest for a final, definitive solution. A novel by the renowned Fred Vargas, L’homme à l’envers [The Inside-Out Man], plays upon ancient fears of the werewolf legend, even as it engages contemporary questions of race, class and gender in a French context. Just as the text turns certain assumptions “inside out” (among them, the assumption that its author is a man), it also overturns literary as well as sociocultural conventions. Interspersed among our novels will be several short stories from Maurice Leblanc’s collection, Les Huit coups de l’horloge [The Clock Strikes Eight], published in 1923. Through these accounts of Prince Rénine’s efforts to entertain and seduce a young lady by involving her in his detective pursuits, we will study the France of a bygone era. And of course, we could not conclude the semester without admiring the prowess of renowned Belgian writer Georges Simenon’s immortal Commissaire Maigret! All reading, written work and class discussion will be in French. Final grades will be based on active class participation ; an oral presentation; a short essay; a midterm exam; and the choice of either a final exam or a longer paper.

FRIT F399: Reading for Honors (1-12 cr.)

Number Day/Time
2332 Arranged

For students preparing an honors project to receive a degree with departmental honors in French, contact the Faculty member listed on our honors page, here.

FRIT F413: The French Renaissance (3 cr.)

Number Days Time Room Instructor
30507 TR 11:15-12:30 BH 219 Eric MacPhail

This class provides COLL A&H, COLL Global Civ & Culture credits

This course explores the literary achievements of sixteenth-century France, the Renaissance. We will begin with Marguerite de Navarre’s collection of short stories, l’Heptaméron, which focuses on the social relations of men and women, both in the stories and among the storytellers. Then we will read the lyric poetry of the Pléiade, especially the sonnets of Pierre de Ronsard, prince of poets, and Joachim Du Bellay. Then we will study some historical and political documents of the French Wars of Religion, including the edicts of religious tolerance promulgated by the kings of France. We will conclude with Michel de Montaigne’s Essais, which weigh the challenges of thinking, writing, and living in a time of religious war. Students will write and rewrite two essays and take a final exam. The class will also visit the Lilly library to see what books looked like in the Renaissance.

FRIT F446: Great Poetry of the 19th Century (3 cr.)
The Poet Before the Mirror: Forms of Lyricism in the 19th Century

Number Days Time Room Instructor
30508 TR 4:00-5:15 SY 137 Nicolas Valazza

The Poet Before the Mirror: Forms of Lyricism in the 19th Century

According to the critic Paul Bénichou, “The distinctive trait of Romanticism […] is surely the exaltation of poetry, now considered to be truth, religion, and the illumination of our destiny.” Bénichou is specifically referring to lyric poetry, which asserts itself as the prevailing form of poetry throughout the 19th century. In this course, we will examine the development of French lyric poetry, from the emergence of Romantic subjectivity at the beginning of the 19th century through the “decadent” period at the end of the century, focusing on the personality of the poets, as they figure their sentiments in verse. For the “exaltation of poetry” to which Bénichou refers is above all an exaltation of the Poet, often envisaged as an almost divine creator. Among the poets considered, we will read and analyze poems by Desbordes-Valmore, Lamartine, Vigny, Hugo, Nerval, Musset, Baudelaire, Mallarmé, Verlaine, Rimbaud, Laforgue and others. We will also read some essays meant to situate these poets in their historical and cultural contexts. Given that the course is based on close reading, we will begin the semester with an introduction to French versification and rhetoric, in order to provide students with the necessary tools to analyze the formal aspects of poetry. The final grade will be based on class preparation and participation (10%), a mid-term exam (30%), an oral presentation (30%) and a final paper (30%). The course will be conducted entirely in French.

FRIT F460: La Francophonie nord-américaine (3 cr.)

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
30522TR9:30-10:45GA 0005Vincent Bouchard

In this class, we will explore Francophone cultures in North America, addressing various aspects: architecture, cooking, music, folklore, literature, cinema, radio, and digital arts. From colonial times (Nouvelle-France and Louisiane) until the contemporary period, we will study cultural productions as shaped by the specific conditions of the French-speaking communities (Acadiens, Canadiens français, Créoles, Franco-Ontariens, Québécois, etc.): their experience as minorities on their continent, in their country and (sometimes) even in their province; their relationships with a great variety of other groups (Native Americans, British, Métis, Protestants, etc.); their perspectives from a position between traditional customs (Catholicism, French, ) and present projects (open to a Global World).

Learning Outcomes:

  • Students will explore the settlement of French-speaking people in North America: the adaptation of their ways of living to a foreign environment; the links with the first nations and other settlers; their tactics to survive the British power, the Anglo-protestant majority; as well as contemporary issues.
  • Students will describe and analyze the complex relation between the French-speaking communities and the North American history and geography, the political situations, and the cultural institutions, through various approaches: literary, cinematographic, linguistic, sociological, etc. Students will develop precise vocabulary and narrative techniques for explaining these relationships.
  • Students will learn to interpret both the French and North American legacies of these cultures, by reading/viewing and discussing poems, novels, books, movies, documentaries, etc., in French and English.
  • Students will learn how to research, organize, and present an academic study (written and spoken) demonstrating these learning outcomes.

FRIT X490: Individual Readings in French (3 cr.)

Number Day/Time Instructor
2335 Arranged Massimo Scalabrini

Independent study on a specific topic not taught in one of this semester's regular courses. If interested, complete the permission form.

FRIT F491: Elementary French for Graduate Students (3-4 cr.)

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
2333 (undergrad.)
2334 (grad.)
TR7:15-8:45 pmGA 0003Renata Uzzell

Open with consent of the instructor to undergraduates who have already completed the language requirement for the B.A. in another language. Introduction to structures of the language necessary for reading, followed by reading in graded texts of a general nature. No credit for the French major or minor. Credit given for only one of F491 or any French course at the 100 level.

FRIT F499: Reading for Honors (1-12 cr.)

Number Day/Time Instructor
2336 Arranged Massimo Scalabrini

For students preparing an honors project to receive a degree with departmental honors in French, contact the Faculty member listed on our honors page, here.

Italian Courses

FRIT M100: Elementary Italian I (4 cr.)

Monday, Wednesday, Friday Hybrid Classes

Number Days Time Room Instructor
2343 MWF 9:05-9:55 GA 0011 Lorenzo Bonaiti
2345 MWF 10:10-11:00 BH 149 Alicia Vitti
2344 MWF 11:15-12:05 BH 307 Emma Pcolinski
2346 MWF 12:20-1:10 RE C110 Lisa Dolasinski
11031 MWF 12:20-1:10 BH 240 Lorenzo Bonaiti
2347 MWF 1:25-2:15 GA 0009 Emma Pcolinski
2348 MWF 2:30-3:20 GA 0009 Lorenzo Bonaiti

Monday, Wednesday, Thursday Hybrid Classes

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
**2342MWR8:00-8:50 CANCELLED

Evening Class (Traditional)

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
30556TR7:15-8:45 pmGA 0011Alicia Vitti

Online Class

Number Instructor Notes
10523 Lisa Dolasinski Online meetings on Tuesdays
either 9:30-10:45am or 6:15-7:30pm

See our Online Courses page ("About Online Courses" tab) for more information.

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Introduction to contemporary Italian language, geography, and culture. Involves a broad variety of assignments and activities that develop grammatical competency and proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Cultural topics and simple cultural comparisons are introduced. Credit given for only one of the following: M100, M110, M115, or M491.

Hybrid course: This is a computer enhanced course, which is a combination of traditional classroom time and online instruction. The course meets in class three days a week and involves independent work by students, a portion of which will be performed online. During the semester, students perform a variety of tasks to practice speaking, writing, listening and reading in a cultural context. The grammar focuses on present and simple past tense, allowing the students to speak and write in simple sentences about familiar topics with accuracy and fluency, employing basic conversational strategies.

Evening class (traditional): This evening section of M100 relies less on computer-based learning than the daytime hybrid sections, while still taking advantage of the enhancements available through the online components of the textbook. During the semester, students perform a variety of tasks to practice speaking, writing, listening and reading in a cultural context. The grammar focuses on present and simple past tense, allowing the students to speak and write in simple sentences about familiar topics with accuracy and fluency, employing basic conversational strategies.

Online Class: This beginning Italian course is interactive and conducted completely online. The students do not need to be on campus in order to participate. It requires students to work independently and follow a very structured syllabus. The class meets with the instructor online once a week; meeting hours are flexible. The students are involved in a variety of online tasks such as reading, listening, completing exercises, posting writing assignments and recording responses. All the activities are integrated into a larger cultural context. The grammar focuses on present and simple past tense, allowing the students to speak and write in simple sentences about familiar topics with accuracy and fluency, employing basic conversational strategies.

See textbook info here.(click on the "textbooks" tab on the top right)

FRIT M110: Italian Language through Opera (4 cr.)

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
10674MTWR11:15-12:05BH 314Alicia Vitti

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

This intensive beginning course covers the material of two semesters in one (M100 & M150). This course is intended for people who want to study Italian and are interested in opera and operatic world. The material and assessments will focus on Italian opera, but students will learn today's Italian spoken language. The course meets four times a week and also involves independent work by students, a portion of which will be performed online. During the semester, students are involved in a variety of tasks practicing speaking, writing, listening and reading in a cultural context. The grammar focuses on present, past and future tenses, allowing the students to speak and write in simple sentences about familiar topics with accuracy and fluency. The course is fast-paced and very rewarding. It is recommended for students with previous experience learning foreign languages (specifically Romance languages).

See textbook info here.(click on the "textbooks" tab on the top right)

FRIT M115: Accelerated Elementary Italian (4 cr.)

Number Days Time Room Instructor
2349 MTWR 11:15-12:05 SY 200 Lorenzo Bonaiti

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

This intensive beginning course covers the material of two semesters in one (M100 & M150). The course meets four times a week and also involves independent work by students, a portion of which will be performed online. During the semester students are involved in a variety of tasks practicing speaking, writing, listening and reading in a cultural context. The grammar focuses on present, past and future tenses, allowing the students to speak and write in simple sentences about familiar topics with accuracy and fluency. The course is fast-paced it and very rewarding. It is recommended for students with previous experience learning foreign languages (specifically Romance languages).

See textbook info here.(click on the "textbooks" tab on the top right)

FRIT M150: Elementary Italian II (4 cr.)

Hybrid Class

Number Days Time Room Instructor
2350 MWF 1:25-2:15 BH 222 Marzia Bagnasco
14287 MWF 11:15-12:05 BH 229 Marzia Bagnasco

*Online Class

Number Instructor Notes
**10524 **CANCELED

*Contact The Director of Italian Language Instruction, Dr. Karolina Serafin for permission to enroll in the above online class.

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: M100.

Continued introduction to contemporary Italian language, geography, and culture. Involves a broad variety of assignments and activities that build grammatical competency and proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Practice with new cultural topics and basic cultural analysis. Credit given for only one of the following: M110, M115, M150, or M491.

Hybrid Class: This is a computer enhanced course, which is a combination of traditional classroom time and online instruction. The course meets three days a week and involves independent work by students, a portion of which will be performed online. This course follows M100 and continues to present the beginning-level concepts of Italian language and culture. During the semester students perform a variety of tasks to practice speaking, writing, listening and reading in a cultural context. The grammar focuses on past and future tense, allowing the students to speak and write in simple sentences with accuracy and fluency about familiar topics.

Online Class: This second-semester Italian course is interactive and conducted completely online. The students do not need to be on campus in order to participate. It requires students to work independently and follow a very structured syllabus. The class meets with the instructor online once a week; meeting hours are flexible. The students are involved in a variety of online tasks such as reading, listening, completing exercises, posting writing assignments and recording responses. All the activities are integrated into a larger cultural context. The grammar focuses on past and future tense, allowing the students to speak and write in simple sentences about familiar topics with accuracy and fluency.

See textbook info here.(click on the "textbooks" tab on the top right)

FRIT M200: Intermediate Italian I (3 cr.)

Monday, Wednesday, Friday

Number Days Time Room Instructor
2352 MWF 10:10-11:00 SB 231 Pietro Tripano
12165 MWF 11:15-12:05 JH A107 Giorgio Losi
**2353
Italian Through Pop Music
MWF 12:20-1:10 WH 119 Rosa Borgonovi
2354 MWF 1:25-2:15 BH 235 Rosa Borgonovi

Online Class

Number Instructor Notes
2351 Pietro Tripano Online meetings on Tuesdays
either 9:30-10:45am or 6:15-7:30pm

Note: Contact the Director of Italian Language Instruction, Dr. Karolina Serafin for permission to enroll in the above online course section.

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: M110, M115, M150, or equivalent.

This course is a continuation of Elementary Italian II. In class the students concentrate on reviewing and refining structures learned at the 100-level, but this time at an intermediate level. During the semester students are involved in a variety of tasks practicing speaking, writing, listening and reading in cultural context. The course features study of original Italian short movies that offer the first stimulus for learning intermediate-level vocabulary, grammar and culture. Credit given for only one of M200 or M215.

**class 2353 only -- "Italian Through Pop Music"
This intermediate-level Italian course explores Italian history and culture through some of the main songwriters and rock bands from the 60s up to the present time: Italian song is in fact a very interesting and entertaining topic, rich with cultural references. During the semester students will be involved in a variety of activities: watching music videos, listening to Italian songs and reading lyrics. Such activities will foster a better cultural understanding and will help students improve their listening/reading skills and enrich their vocabulary. This course also includes the study and practice of new grammar structures but the material and assessments will focus on Italian culture related to the music environment.

Online Class: This Intermediate I Italian course is interactive and conducted completely online. The students do not need to be on campus in order to participate. It requires students to work independently and follow a very structured syllabus. The class meets with the instructor online once a week; meeting hours are flexible. The students are involved in a variety of online tasks at the intermediate level, such as reading, listening, completing exercises, posting writing assignments and recording responses. All the activities are integrated into a larger cultural context. The grammar reviews all the material learned in previous courses in an intermediate context and increases skills by adding more intermediate structures and vocabulary.

See textbook info here.(click on the "textbooks" tab on the top right)

FRIT M215: Accelerated Second-Year Italian (4 cr.)

Number Days Time Room Instructor
6510 MTWR 1:25-2:15 WH 202 Karolina Serafin

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: M115 or equivalent (M100 and M150)

This intensive intermediate-level Italian course covers the material of two semesters in one (M200 & M250). The course builds upon the first three semesters of beginning Italian (or equivalent) adding the unique feature of short films as the first stimulus for learning intermediate-level vocabulary, grammar, and cultural concepts. The various activities aim to strengthen proficiency in listening, speaking, reading and writing, and students will gain the ability to understand, evaluate, compare, and appreciate many aspects of Italian culture. The course is fast-paced and very rewarding. It is recommended for students with previous experience learning foreign languages (specifically Romance languages). Credit given for only one of the following: M215 or M200-M250.

See textbook info here.(click on the "textbooks" tab on the top right)

FRIT M222: Topics in Italian Culture
Italian & Italian American Female Voices: Visions of Selfhood and Society

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
*33978Thursdays1:00-2:15BH 319Colleen Ryan

*Above class hybrid format: Additional work required online.

This class provides COLL A&H, COLL Global Civ & Culture, and GenEd A&H, GenEd World Cultures credits

This course is taught in English.

This course is an active comparative exploration of Italian female identities, as portrayed and expressed by 20th and 21st century Italian women writers in Italy and abroad, in the mainstreams and margins of both Italian mainland and diasporic cultures. The course will show how Italian female voices are intrinsic to literary traditions and offer critical lenses through which to understand gender, class, and ethnicity across time.

FRIT M250: Intermediate Italian II (3 cr.)

Number Days Time Room Instructor
4452 MWF 1:25-2:15 WH 119 Lucia Gemmani
30557 MWF 11:15-12:05 BH 332 Francesco Samarini

Online Class

Number Instructor Notes
*11375 Lucia Gemmani Online meetings on Wednesdays
either 9:30-10:45am or 6:15-7:30pm

*Contact the Director of Italian Language Instruction, Dr. Karolina Serafin for permission to enroll in the above online class.

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: M200 or equivalent.

This second-year Italian course meets three times a week and builds upon the first three semesters of beginning and intermediate Italian (or equivalent). In M250, students concentrate on learning how to express their ideas and debate the pros and cons of certain situations as well as to offer advice and express opinions on a variety of familiar subjects, all in the Italian language. The students are involved in a variety of tasks practicing speaking, writing, listening and reading in a cultural context. The course includes study of original Italian short movies that offer the first stimulus for learning intermediate-level vocabulary, grammar and culture.

Online Class: This Intermediate II Italian course is interactive and conducted completely online. The students do not need to be on campus in order to participate. It requires students to work independently and follow a very structured syllabus. The class meets with the instructor online once a week; meeting hours are flexible. The students are involved in a variety of online tasks at the intermediate level, such as reading, listening, completing exercises, posting writing assignments and recording responses. All the activities are integrated into a larger cultural context. The grammar focuses on intermediate level structures, such as subjunctives.

See textbook info here.(click on the "textbooks" tab on the top right)

FRIT M300: Italian Conversation & Diction (4 cr.)

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
4453MTWRF10:10-11:00SY 108Lisa Dolasinski &
Francesco Samarini

Prerequisite: M250, M215, or consent of instructor.

Conducted in Italian, this course continues the study of advanced structures through a variety of media and authentic texts. While the focus is on accuracy and fluency in speaking, practice with other skills and the study of Italian culture will be integrated throughout.

FRIT M307: Masterpieces of Italian Literature I (3 cr.)

Number Days Time Room Instructor
30558 TR 11:15-12:30 BH 245 Lucia Gemmani

This class provides COLL A&H, COLL Global Civ & Culture credits

Prerequisite: M300 or M301 or consent of instructor.

This course focuses on Italian literature from the Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque periods. We will analyze texts from the early centuries of Italian literature, especially the most influential works, such as Dante’s Divine Comedy, Petrarch’s Canzoniere, Boccaccio’s Decameron, Machiavelli’s Prince, Ariosto’s Orlando Furioso, Tasso’s Gerusalemme Liberata, Marino’s Adone, Isabella Andreini’s theater, Michelangelo and Leonardo’s literary production, Veronica Franco's letters, Vittoria Colonna’s poetry, and Galileo’s scientific prose. We will explore the different genres and forms of literature they belong to and negotiate with; the themes and cultural trends they address; the historical and intellectual contexts surrounding and informing them. We will also look at these works through a comparative approach meant to emphasize the relationship between models and innovators, tradition and challenging revisions, in order to understand the interlaced dialogue among these texts. Through the study of literature, we will also continue the study and practice of Italian advanced grammar and style. This course is taught in Italian.

FRIT M455: Seminar in Italian Cinema (3 cr.)
Past and Present Maestri of Italian Cinema

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
30559TR2:30-3:45WH 106Antonio Vitti

This survey will cover seven films from the Silent era to the contemporary Italian film scene. We will study the representation of the unity of Italy, the wars fought to forge a national identity, individual and collective conflicts, and forms of escape from cultural repression and isolation, but also how Italians have and had fun. Students will learn the role of cinema in Italian society as well as the artistic and technical achievements of Italian maestri through films that leave an indelible visual experience. Topics covered will include the basics of film language as well.

FRIT X493: Individual Readings in Italian Literature (1-3 cr.)

Number Day/Time Instructor
2355 Arranged Massimo Scalabrini

Independent study on a specific topic not taught in one of this semester's regular courses. If interested, complete the permission form.

FRIT M499: Reading for Honors (3 cr.)

Number Day/Time Instructor
2356 Arranged Massimo Scalabrini

For students preparing an honors project to receive a degree with departmental honors in Italian.

Interdisciplinary Courses

COLL C103: Critical Approaches in Arts & Humanities (3 cr.)
A Question of Love

Number Days Time Room Instructor
7994 TR 1:25-2:15 GY 143 Hall Bjornstad
10284 F 9:05-9:55 SY 108 Amanda Vredenburgh
31087 F 11:15-12:05 SE 245 Amanda Vredenburgh
31088 F 12:20-1:10 SE 245 Amanda Vredenburgh

Fulfills GenEd A&H and COLL (CASE) A&H Breadth of Inquiry credits

Is love at first sight a result of hormonal processes, the intervention of capricious gods, the expression of human will, or pure accident? In this class we will explore love as phenomenon and as representation from multiple perspectives taking advantage of the tools of cultural analysis, art and literature interpretation, and scientific research to answer questions such as: What is love in 2017? What was it in the past? What would we be without it? Material studied will include film and literature, painting and music, alongside scientific texts, critical work and essays.



French Courses

FRIT F100: Elementary French I (4 cr.)

Monday, Wednesday, Friday

Number Days Time Room Instructor Notes
2753 MWF 9:05-9:55 BH 247 Amber Panwitz Hybrid
2757 MWF 10:10-11:00 BH 236 Amber Panwitz Hybrid
2754 MWF 11:15-12:05 GA 0009 Ludovic Mompelat Hybrid
2755 MWF 12:20-1:10 GA 0009 Ludovic Mompelat Hybrid
2756 MWF 1:25-2:15 GA 0009 Billy Lebbs Hybrid

Monday, Wednesday

Number Days Time Room Instructor Notes
2758 MW 7:15-8:45 BH 148 Billy Lebbs Traditional

Online Class

Number Instructor Notes
*11311 Amber Panwitz Online meetings Tuesdays
either 11:15-12:30 or 5:45-7:00 pm

*Please submit the form here for permission to enroll in the above 100% online class. See our Online Courses page ("About Online Courses" tab) for more information.

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Introduction to French language and selected aspects of French civilization and culture. Credit given for only one of F100, F115, or F491. See our online and hybrid courses page for more information about teaching and learning methods.

FRIT F115: Accelerated Elementary French (4 cr.)

Number Days Time Room Instructor
7389 MTWR 11:15-12:05 BH 244 Elizabeth Myers

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: Obtain authorization from department.

An accelerated treatment of material covered in both F100 and F150 designed for superior students and students with previous training in another foreign language. Credit given for only one of F115 and F100; Credit given for only one of F115 and F150. If interested, please fill out the online authorization form.

FRIT F150: Elementary French II: Language and Culture (4 cr.)

Monday, Wednesday, Friday

Number Days Time Room Instructor Notes
2759 MWF 9:05-9:55 GA 0013 Evie Munier hybrid
2761 MWF 10:10-11:00 BH 246 Chase Tiffany hybrid
2762 MWF 11:15-12:05 RE C 110 Chase Tiffany hybrid
2764 MWF 1:25-2:15 BH 140 Apoorva Sarmal hybrid
2765 MWF 2:30-3:20 BH 231 Apoorva Sarmal hybrid

Monday, Wednesday, Thursday

Number Days Time Room Instructor Notes
2760 MWR 8:00-8:50 BH 149 Shawn Gasseling Hybrid

Monday, Wednesday

Number Days Time Room Instructor Notes
2766 MW 7:15-8:45 BH 215 Jill Owen Traditional

Online Class

Number Instructor Notes
*2763 Jill Owen Online meetings Thursdays
either 11:15-12:30 or 5:45-7:00 pm

*Please submit the form here for permission to enroll in the above 100% online class. See our Online Courses page ("About Online Courses" tab) for more information.

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: F100 or equivalent.

Basic structures of the French language and selected topics of French civilization and culture. Credit given for only one of the following: F115, F150, or F491. See our online and hybrid courses page for more information about teaching and learning methods.

FRIT F152: Beginning French Conversation II (1 cr.)

Number Day/Time Instructor
32507 Arranged Barbara Vance

Corequisite: F150.

This companion course to F150 gives beginning students the opportunity to practice conversational French in a relaxed setting with peers. Led by advanced students of French working under faculty guidance, group activities may include discussion, games, magazine/newspaper/movie discussions, cultural events, cooking, etc. S/F grading. No credit for French major.

FRIT F200: Second-Year French I: Language and Culture (3 cr.)

Monday, Wednesday, Friday

Number Days Time Room Instructor
2768 MWF 10:10-11:00 BH 307 Leila El-Murr
2769 MWF 12:20-1:10 BH 336 Andrew Karsten
2770 MWF 1:25-2:15 GA 0013 Martin Maillot
2771 MWF 2:30-3:20 GA 0013 Yuanshuai Cui

Monday, Wednesday Evenings

Number Days Time Room Instructor
2772 MW 7:15-8:30 GA 0007 Rishani Merinnage De Costa

Online

Number Instructor Notes
*2767 Charlène Gilbert Online meetings Tuesdays
either 11:15-12:30 or 5:45-7:00 pm

*Please submit the form here for permission to enroll in the above 100% online class. See our Online Courses page ("About Online Courses" tab) for more information.

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: F150 or equivalent.

Grammar, composition, conversation coordinated with the study of cultural texts. Credit given for only one of the following third-semester courses: F200 or F265. See our online and hybrid courses page for more information about teaching and learning methods.

FRIT F202: Intermediate French Conversation I (1 cr.)

Number Day/Time Instructor
32508 Arranged Barbara Vance

Corequisite: F200.

This companion course to F200 gives intermediate students the opportunity to practice conversational French in a relaxed setting with peers. Led by advanced students of French working under faculty guidance, group activities may include discussion, games, magazine/newspaper/movie discussions, cultural events, cooking, etc. S/F grading. No credit for French major.

FRIT F250: Second-Year French II: Language and Culture (3 cr.)

Monday, Wednesday, Friday

Number Days Time Room Instructor
2774 MWF 9:05-9:55 BH 214 Taylor MacDonald
2775 MWF 10:10-11:00 BH 232 Taylor MacDonald
2778 MWF 11:15-12:05 BH 333 Alana Duncan
2779 MWF 12:20-1:10 WH 106 Cris Robu
2780 MWF 1:25-2:15 BH 233 Aiko Okamoto-Macphail
2776 MWF 1:25-2:15 BH 322 Alana Duncan
2777 MWF 2:30-3:20 GA 0009 Scott Evans

Monday, Wednesday Evenings

Number Days Time Room Instructor
2781 MW 7:15-8:30 GA 0005 Mark Black

Online Class

Number Instructor Notes
*2773 Kate Bastin Online meetings Thursdays
either 11:15-12:30 or 5:45-7:00 pm

*Please submit the form here for permission to enroll in the above 100% online class. See our Online Courses page ("About Online Courses" tab) for more information.

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: F200 or equivalent.

Grammar, composition, conversation coordinated with the study of cultural texts. Credit given for only one of the following fourth-semester courses: F250 or F265. See our online and hybrid courses page for more information about teaching and learning methods.

FRIT F252: Intermediate French Conversation II (1 cr.)

Number Day/Time Instructor
32509 Arranged Barbara Vance

Corequisite: F250.

This companion course to F250 gives intermediate students the opportunity to practice conversational French in a relaxed setting with peers. Led by advanced students of French working under faculty guidance, group activities may include discussion, games, magazine/newspaper/movie discussions, cultural events, cooking, etc. S/F grading. No credit for French major.

FRIT F265: Accelerated Second-Year French (4 cr.)

Number Days Time Room Instructor
11995 MTWR 12:20-1:10 WH 006 Anemarie Calin

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: Obtain authorization from department.

An accelerated treatment of material covered in both F200 and F250. Grammar, composition, and conversation coordinated with readings of short texts. Students who complete F265 cannot also receive credit for F200 or F250.

If interested, please fill out the FRIT Course Authorization Form.

FRIT F300: Reading & Expression in French (3 cr.)

This class provides COLL A&H Breadth of Inquiry credit

Prerequisite: F250, F265, equivalent or consent of department.

Number Days Time Room Instructor Notes
2782 TR 2:30-3:45 BH 205 Vincent Bouchard L'Afrique de l'Ouest francophone
2783 MWF 10:10-11:00 BH 238 Elizabeth Hebbard Dangerous Women in French Literature and Adaptation
2784 TR 9:30-10:45 BH 105 Oana Panaïté Travelers and Immigrants in French Literature and Film

Vincent Bouchard

L’Afrique de l’Ouest francophone

Exploration historique et culturelle de l’Afrique de l'Ouest à travers les contes, les sculptures, les tableaux, les livres, les bandes dessinées, les films, etc., qui décrivent la vie en français.

Elizabeth Hebbard

Dangerous Women in French Literature and Adaptation

Ce cours vous propose de découvrir la culture française grâce à quelques textes littéraires classiques connus aussi pour leurs adaptations à l’opéra et au cinéma, ainsi que dans la musique contemporaine, la bande dessinée, et les arts plastiques. Nous allons lire, écouter, regarder et interpréter des œuvres célèbres comme Le Mariage de Figaro, Carmen, Salomé et La Bohème qui parlent d’amour, de désir, de jalousie mais aussi de la religion, de la condition des femmes, de la critique des inégalités sociales et de conflits politiques. L’objectif de ce cours est de permettre aux étudiants de développer leurs connaissances littéraires et leurs compétences analytiques, tout en améliorant leur expression orale et écrite.

Oana Panaïté

Travelers and Immigrants in French Literature and Film

En proposant une exploration du voyage et de l’immigration – deux thèmes d’actualité – dans la littérature et au cinéma, ce cours d’introduction à la littérature et au cinéma en français offre aux étudiants l’occasion de perfectionner leur français écrit et oral, d’améliorer leurs capacités analytiques et de se familiariser davantage avec la culture française et francophone. Nous utiliserons le manuel Entre-Textes : Dialogues littéraires et culturels (Routledge, 2017) ainsi que des documents disponibles sur Canvas.

FRIT F305: Stage and Page (3 cr.)
Theater of the World

Number Days Time Room Instructor
30624 TR 11:15-12:30 BH 219 Aiko Okomoto-MacPhail

This class provides CASE A&H credits

Prerequisite: F300

This course invites you on a virtual journey through the reading of essays in French literature and the viewing of old maps in the genre of the atlas called Theater of the World (Theatrum orbis mundi). We start with a letter written by a Princess of Bohemia to the French philosopher René Descartes. The princess whom Descartes tutored was not satisfied with Cartesian mechanistic philosophy, and Descartes had to answer her. From her letter, we fly, with Descartes and his philosophy, to a large and expanding world. We will read an excerpt from the travelogue of the first French navigator who sailed around the world, Louis-Antoine Bougainville, and an essay inspired by him: Denis Diderot’s Supplément au voyage de Bougainville. Through maps, we continue to the last navigator of the French monarchy Jean-François de Galaup de La Pérouse and his map of California with excerpts from his travelogue. After La Pérouse, who mapped the entire world a year before the French Revolution, travel would soon become a French middle-class pleasure. We will end the semester with Eugène Labiche’s play about family travel, Le Voyage de monsieur Perrichon.

We will hold some classes in the Lilly Library and consult its collection of old maps.

The grade will be based on your own two essays with rewrites and one in-class presentation of your essay project.

FRIT F306: Fiction and Poetry (3 cr.)

Number Days Time Room Instructor
2785 MWF 11:15-12:05 BH 140 Eric MacPhail

This class provides COLL A&H credits

Prerequisite: F300

This course is the sequel to F300 and we build on the skills acquired there to read poems and novels by French authors from different periods of French history. We will begin by reading a selection of lyric poems from the Middle Ages to the 20th century. Each student will select one poem from the reader on which to give a class presentation and write a short essay, which will be revised according to the professor’s comments. Then we will read a novel by the Enlightenment philosopher Denis Diderot called Jacques le fataliste et son maître, followed by a test in class. Next we will study Guillaume Apollinaire’s modernist experiment with visual poetry, Calligrammes, and students will deliver a presentation on the calligramme of their choice. Our last assignment is the novel Les caves du Vatican by the 20th-century author André Gide. The final exam will be on Gide’s novel.

FRIT F311: French/Francophone Studies Through Film (3 cr.)
European Cinema and Genre
Joint-listed with MSCH-F 398 and EURO-W 406

Number Days Time Room Instructor
30629 TR 1:00-2:15 WY 115 Vincent Bouchard

This class provides CASE A&H, & CASE Global Civ & Culture credits. Taught in English

Taking a comparative, transnational approach, this course offers an overview of European cinema as an evolving art and as a means of tracing the evolution of European society, politics, and identity from the early twentieth century through the present, using representative films from France, Italy, Germany, Spain, Sweden, and the Soviet Union. We will also investigate how cinema has shaped national identities and promoted international competition and collaboration. In so doing, our study of film will naturally open onto a variety of other disciplines, such as history, psychology, sociology, political science, and gender studies. More specifically, we will address the following goals:

  • to understand the diverse social and political functions of film as an instrument for articulating and legitimizing state policies and normative cultural values, as well as a means of critiquing and resisting those policies and values
  • to evaluate how institutional practices (such as censorship, financing, and access to technology and training) have shaped the form and function of cinema in various countries at various historical moments
  • to think critically about how positive and negative stereotypes of various kinds are created, disseminated, and perpetuated by cinema
  • to understand film as a transnational form of expression that constantly disseminates, adapts, and recycles ideas, aesthetics, and practices across time and space

FRIT F313: Advanced Grammar (3 cr.)

Number Days Time Room Instructor
2786 MWF 11:15-12:05 BH 314 Barbara Vance
7736 MWF 1:25-2:15 JH A107 Eric Macphail
**30655** MWF 10:10-11:00 BH 232 **this section has been canceled**

Prerequisite: F250 or equivalent

Barbara Vance

F313 builds students' understanding of advanced aspects of French grammar and their facility in applying this understanding to written and oral expression. We will supplement the text Contrastes (Rochat) with exercises (online and others) and compositions based on various materials from French and francophone everyday society, including e.g. cross-cultural studies, journalism, and film.

Eric Macphail

Comprehensive grammar review with in depth study of the most complex features of written French. Four tests including final. Texts are Harper’s Grammar of French and the workbook, both available as ClassPaks.

Aiko Okamoto-Macphail

This course has two aims of first offering a synthesis of French grammar you learned to date and second preparing you for the courses in French culture and civilization at the F300 and F400 levels. The textbook we use is the second edition of Contrastes with the on-line workbook.

Early in the semester, you will choose one topic from French or Francophone on-line newspapers that you would like to focus on, as well as the grammar points that you would most like to improve. Then you will follow that news, read the articles, and bring them to class so that we all can translate some extracts and write short reports while working on the grammar points. Homework will use the on-line workbook for Contrastes, and in class, we will do more problem solving and non-mechanical exercises that demand explanations and in-depth analysis of grammar, including, but is not limited to, translation exercises. We will treat grammar as one of several skills of living the French language.

FRIT F316: Conversational Practice (3 cr.)

Number Days Time Room Instructor
2787 MWF 12:20-1:10 BH 142 Laura Demsey
2788 MWF 11:15-12:05 BH 139 Amanda Vredenburgh
2789 TR 7:15-8:30 GA 0007 Amanda Vredenburgh

Prerequisite: F250/F265 or equivalent.

Recent and classic award-winning feature-length French films (comedies, dramas, thrillers) provide the basis for vocabulary expansion, in-class discussion and debates, and an increased understanding of various French cultural and historical issues, including immigration, WWII, regional differences, and religious conflict. Class time will maximize speaking opportunities. Grading is based on in-class participation, presentations, and oral and written exams. NOTE: Students are required to watch the films outside of class (online streaming).

FRIT F317: French in the Business World (3 cr.)

Number Days Time Room Instructor
2790 TR 1:00-2:15 GA 0007 Brett Bowles

Prerequisite: F250 or equivalent.

This class provides CASE S&H Breadth of Inquiry credit

French 317 is a broad introduction to Francophone business language and culture. The course takes a functional approach that develops the four language skills and their practical application. The course covers topics useful to all fields (résumé writing, letters of application, resources to identify potential job openings, the institutional structure of the French commerce, specialized vocabulary/idiomatic expressions, socio-cultural aspects of business in France, differences from American business culture) and provides more specialized information about the main business sectors in which students may want to seek employment such as finance, marketing, management, and entrepreneurship.

FRIT F363: La France 1800-aujourd'hui (3 cr.)

Number Days Time Room Instructor
30656 TR 11:15-12:30 BH 232 Oana Panaïté

This class provides COLL (CASE) A&H Breadth of Inquiry and COLL (CASE) Global Civ & Culture credits

Prerequisite: F300 or equivalent

Le cours offre une introduction générale à la civilisation, l’histoire et la culture de la France moderne et contemporaine. L’objectif principal du cours est d’améliorer votre compétence culturelle en vous familiarisant avec la géographie, l’histoire, la politique, l’économie, la société et la culture française. Ces notions vous seront extrêmement utiles nos seulement pour vos études de français mais également pour tout autre formation qui exige une compétence culturelle internationale. Vous comprendrez la tradition et les coutumes d’un autre pays, en faisant des comparaisons avec votre propre expérience et en ayant l’occasion de vous approprier ces informations de manière critique et originale.

Nous utiliserons le manuel La France contemporaine, 5e édition, par W. Edmiston et A. Duménil (Cengage Learning), ainsi que des documents disponibles sur Canvas.

FRIT F375: Thèmes Littéraires et Culturels (3 cr.)
Losing It: Chaos and Control in Early Modern French Literature

Number Days Time Room Instructor
6899 TR 2:30-3:45 GA 0007 Hall Bjornstad

This class provides COLL (CASE) A&H Breadth of Inquiry credit

Prerequisite: F300 or equivalent.

The French seventeenth century saw the rise of political absolutism in response to the chaos of civil war. However, the desire to exert control over the self (emotions, habits, ambitions etc.) and the body politic created tension and pressure that led to extravagant ways of “losing it.” In this course we will examine the dynamic between the desire to control and inevitable chaos through a study of plays, fairytales, philosophical essays, fables and a novel. Weekly response papers, scaffolded final writing portfolio. The course will be conducted in French.

FRIT F399: Reading for Honors (1-12 cr.)

Number Day/Time
2791 Arranged

For students preparing an honors project to receive a degree with departmental honors in French, contact the Faculty member listed on our honors page, here.

FRIT F401: Structure & Development of French (3 cr.)

Number Days Time Room Instructor
2792 TR 9:30-10:45 GA 0007 Kevin Rottet

This class provides CASE S&H credits

Prerequisite: F313 or F314, or consent of instructor.

This course provides an overview of the structure of present day French, a perspective on its historical development, and an analysis of some of the current language-related issues in the French-speaking world. We will first consider the history of Modern French from an external perspective, by examining some important historical events in the history of the language, and from an internal perspective, by looking at some of the specific ways the language has changed over time. Then we will talk about variation in French, or how French differs geographically (i.e. dialects and regional varieties in France and in the French-speaking world), how it differs socially (i.e. how social categories such as socioeconomic class or sex are reflected in language use), and how it differs situationally (i.e. how people change the ways they speak depending on who they’re talking to, the formality of the situation, etc.). Along the way we will look at spoken versus written French, slang, and français populaire. Next we will discuss directions for the future: how French creates new words (neologisms), copes with English influence (Anglicisms), and addresses issues concerning the feminization of the names of occupations traditionally practiced by males.

FRIT F423: 17th Century French Literature (3 cr.)
Obscenity in Seventeenth-Century French Literature

Number Days Time Room Instructor
30662 TR 2:30-3:45 GA 0005 Alison Calhoun

Prerequisite: F305, F306, or F375 plus one other civilization or literature class above F300, or permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

We need not look far to find examples in American popular culture of our discomfort in the face of sexuality and the question of sexual indecency. Whether we are considering Presidents and their relationships with women (interns, TV personalities, their own daughters), questions of public and private urination, films like Brüno and Borat, Tiger Woods’s infidelities, Janet Jackson’s so-called “wardrobe malfunction” at the Super Bowl, we are constantly proving our obsession with defining and judging, most often censuring, what might fall under the category of the “obscene.”

In this advanced French literature course, focusing on the seventeenth century, we will take advantage of the fact that these same preoccupations proliferated in the early modern period, notably at a time when pornography (iconographical and literary) was regaining its place in society. We will read and analyze several authors writing in varying genres (comedy, tragi-comedy, poems, dialogues) in which the themes of sexual taboo, provocation, and desire are diversely articulated. We will additionally read current articles and book chapters that dialogue with these works of literature, helping us understand their relevance to contemporary debates about obscenity. Grades will be based on rough and final drafts of two papers (15% per draft and 25% per final paper) as well as student preparation (10%) and the presentation of one of your paper topics in class (10%). This course will be taught entirely in French. The seminar will include frequent visits to the Kinsey Institute.

FRIT F450: Culture & Society in French Studies (3 cr.)
Gender, Race, Culture, Narrative

Number Days Time Room Instructor
13230 TR 11:15-12:30 BH 105 Margaret Gray

This class fulfills CASE A&H Breadth of Inquiry credit and CASE Global Civ & Culture credit

Prerequisite: Two 300-level civilization or literature classes above F300, or permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

This course explores the tangled questions that inform gendered, racial and cultural relationships as expressed within a range of novels in French. Our narratives will include the part-narrative, part-epistolary 1900 fiction of Marguerite Vallette-Eymery-- who took as her pen name « Rachilde. » Her hybrid novel La jongleuse studies the daring effort of an iconoclastic Creole widow to carve an identity within the stifling bourgeois norms and conventions of turn-of-the-century Paris. From the French Antilles and the racial and cultural context to which Eliante longs to return, we will travel to Belgium with Jacqueline Harpman’s novel Orlanda (1996) and the subtle, contemporary dystopia of a young woman’s journey to awareness of her confinement within the roles of successful professor and beloved companion. Written as a riposte to the conformist ending of Virginia Woolf’s romp through gendered convention in her 1928 novel, Orlando, Harpman’s narrative engages fantasy to oppose gendered norms through the conflict opposing two halves of a single person : the timid, feminine Aline and her outrageous masculine double, Orlanda. Fred Vargas’s L’homme à l’envers [The Inside-Out Man] takes us to a corner of rugged, rural France, and a climate of suspicion and superstition, where we will pursue the entwined narratives of a young African man and a young French woman composer/plumber/truck-driver as they negotiate cultural hostility motivated by racial and gendered prejudice. Just as the text turns certain assumptions “inside out” (among them, the assumption that its author is a man), it also overturns literary as well as sociocultural conventions. Selected scenes from the novel’s film adaptation will be consulted to test, contest and/or expand our reading. Comment Cuisiner son Mari à l’Africaine (2000) by Cameroonian immigrant to Paris Calixthe Beyala pursues similar questions of racial and gendered identity within a contemporary Paris as its protagonist struggles to reconcile her traditionalist African past with a cosmopolitan present filled with false solutions. Across these various narratives and their differing geographies, we will be constantly attentive to the formal choices made by our fictions as they explore gendered, racial and cultural tensions. Student performance will be evaluated on the basis of active class participation ; an oral presentation ; an essay exam ; a short analytical paper ; and a final exercise consisting of a choice between an essay exam or a longer analytical paper.

FRIT X471: French Conversation Group Leadership (1 cr.)

Number Day/Time Instructor
32510 Arranged Barbara Vance

Note: Contact Professor Barbara Vance for permission to enroll in the course.

Under the guidance of their instructor, advanced students of French facilitate weekly French conversation groups for lower level students. Leaders are responsible for planning all group sessions, including discussion topics generated by magazine/newspaper articles and movies, and activities such as games and cooking. No credit for French major. May be repeated for a total of 4 credit hours.

FRIT F490: Individual Readings in French (3 cr.)

Number Day/Time
2795 Arranged

Independent study on a specific topic not taught in one of this semester's regular courses. If interested, complete the permission form.

FRIT F492: Reading French for Graduate Students (4 cr.)

Number Days Time Room Instructor
2793 TR 7:15-8:45 pm
(undergrad)
GA 0003 Jacob Ladyga
2794 TR 7:15-8:45 pm
(grad)
GA 0003 Jacob Ladyga

Prerequisite: F491 or consent of department. Open with consent of the instructor to undergraduates who have already completed the B.A. language requirement in another language.

Continuation of language and reading development from F491. Credit given for only one of F492 or any of the following: F150, F169, F200, F205, or F219.

FRIT F499: Reading for Honors (1-12 cr.)

Number Day/Time Instructor
2796 Arranged Massimo Scalabrini

For students preparing an honors project to receive a degree with departmental honors in French, contact the Faculty member listed on our honors page, here.

Italian Courses

FRIT M100: Elementary Italian I (4 cr.)

Monday, Wednesday, Friday Hybrid Classes

Number Days Time Room Instructor
2804 MWF 12:20-1:10 BH 214 L Bonaiti
2803 MWF 1:25-2:15 BH 237 A Vitti
2802 MWF 11:15-12:05 BH 246 P Tripano

Online Class

Number Instructor Notes
2801 L Bonaiti Online meetings
9:30-10:45am or 7:15-8:30pm

See our Online Courses page ("About Online Courses" tab) for more information.

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Introduction to contemporary Italian language, geography, and culture. Involves a broad variety of assignments and activities that develop grammatical competency and proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Cultural topics and simple cultural comparisons are introduced. Credit given for only one of the following: M100, M110, M115, or M491.

Hybrid course: This is a computer enhanced course, which is a combination of traditional classroom time and online instruction. The course meets in class three days a week and involves independent work by students, a portion of which will be performed online. During the semester, students perform a variety of tasks to practice speaking, writing, listening and reading in a cultural context. The grammar focuses on present and simple past tense, allowing the students to speak and write in simple sentences about familiar topics with accuracy and fluency, employing basic conversational strategies.

Evening class (traditional): This evening section of M100 relies less on computer-based learning than the daytime hybrid sections, while still taking advantage of the enhancements available through the online components of the textbook. During the semester, students perform a variety of tasks to practice speaking, writing, listening and reading in a cultural context. The grammar focuses on present and simple past tense, allowing the students to speak and write in simple sentences about familiar topics with accuracy and fluency, employing basic conversational strategies.

Online Class: This beginning Italian course is interactive and conducted completely online. The students do not need to be on campus in order to participate. It requires students to work independently and follow a very structured syllabus. The class meets with the instructor online once a week; meeting hours are flexible. The students are involved in a variety of online tasks such as reading, listening, completing exercises, posting writing assignments and recording responses. All the activities are integrated into a larger cultural context. The grammar focuses on present and simple past tense, allowing the students to speak and write in simple sentences about familiar topics with accuracy and fluency, employing basic conversational strategies.

FRIT M115: Accelerated Elementary Italian (4 cr.)

Number Days Time Room Instructor
2805 MTWR 11:15-12:05 WH 006 M Bagnasco

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

This intensive beginning course covers the material of two semesters in one (M100 & M150). The course meets four times a week and also involves independent work by students, a portion of which will be performed online. During the semester students are involved in a variety of tasks practicing speaking, writing, listening and reading in a cultural context. The grammar focuses on present, past and future tenses, allowing the students to speak and write in simple sentences about familiar topics with accuracy and fluency. The course is fast-paced it and very rewarding. It is recommended for students with previous experience learning foreign languages (specifically Romance languages).

FRIT M150: Elementary Italian II (4 cr.)

Monday, Wednesday, Friday

Hybrid Class

Number Days Time Room Instructor
5870 MWF 9:05-9:55 GA 0009 A Vitti
2806 MWF 10:10-11:00 RE C110 A Vitti
2807 MWF 11:15-12:05 BH 345 L Gemmani
4679 MWF 1:25-2:15 BH 139 L Gemmani

*Online Class

Number Instructor Notes
2808 Emma Pcolinski Online meetings Thursdays
either 9:30-10:45 am or 7:15-8:30 pm

*Contact The Director of Italian Language Instruction, Dr. Karolina Serafin for permission to enroll in the above online class.

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: M100 or equivalent.

Continued introduction to contemporary Italian language, geography, and culture. Involves a broad variety of assignments and activities that build grammatical competency and proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Practice with new cultural topics and basic cultural analysis. Credit given for only one of the following: M110, M115, M150, or M491.

Hybrid Class: This is a computer enhanced course, which is a combination of traditional classroom time and online instruction. The course meets three days a week and involves independent work by students, a portion of which will be performed online. This course follows M100 and continues to present the beginning-level concepts of Italian language and culture. During the semester students perform a variety of tasks to practice speaking, writing, listening and reading in a cultural context. The grammar focuses on past and future tense, allowing the students to speak and write in simple sentences with accuracy and fluency about familiar topics.

Online Class: This second-semester Italian course is interactive and conducted completely online. The students do not need to be on campus in order to participate. It requires students to work independently and follow a very structured syllabus. The class meets with the instructor online once a week; meeting hours are flexible. The students are involved in a variety of online tasks such as reading, listening, completing exercises, posting writing assignments and recording responses. All the activities are integrated into a larger cultural context. The grammar focuses on past and future tense, allowing the students to speak and write in simple sentences about familiar topics with accuracy and fluency.

FRIT M200: Intermediate Italian I (3 cr.)

Monday, Wednesday, Friday

Number Days Time Room Instructor
7390 MWF 1:25-2:15 BH 134 G Losi

Online Class

Number Instructor Notes
2811 G Losi Online meetings Tuesdays
9:30-10:45am or 7:15-8:30pm

Note: Contact the Director of Italian Language Instruction, Dr. Karolina Serafin for permission to enroll in the above online course section.

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: M110, M115, M150, or equivalent.

This course is a continuation of Elementary Italian II. In class the students concentrate on reviewing and refining structures learned at the 100-level, but this time at an intermediate level. During the semester students are involved in a variety of tasks practicing speaking, writing, listening and reading in cultural context. The course features study of original Italian short movies that offer the first stimulus for learning intermediate-level vocabulary, grammar and culture. Credit given for only one of M200 or M215.

Online Class: This Intermediate I Italian course is interactive and conducted completely online. The students do not need to be on campus in order to participate. It requires students to work independently and follow a very structured syllabus. The class meets with the instructor online once a week; meeting hours are flexible. The students are involved in a variety of online tasks at the intermediate level, such as reading, listening, completing exercises, posting writing assignments and recording responses. All the activities are integrated into a larger cultural context. The grammar reviews all the material learned in previous courses in an intermediate context and increases skills by adding more intermediate structures and vocabulary.

FRIT M215: Accelerated Second-Year Italian (4 cr.)

Number Days Time Room Instructor
6718 MTWR 1:25-2:15 SY 137 L Dolasinski

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: M115 or equivalent (M100 and M150)

This intensive intermediate-level Italian course covers the material of two semesters in one (M200 & M250). The course builds upon the first three semesters of beginning Italian (or equivalent) adding the unique feature of short films as the first stimulus for learning intermediate-level vocabulary, grammar, and cultural concepts. The various activities aim to strengthen proficiency in listening, speaking, reading and writing, and students will gain the ability to understand, evaluate, compare, and appreciate many aspects of Italian culture. The course is fast-paced and very rewarding. It is recommended for students with previous experience learning foreign languages (specifically Romance languages). Students must be recommended for this course by their Italian instructor in M150, M110 or M115. If you have not previously taken Italian on the Bloomington IU campus but you tested into M200 on the placement exam and would like to take M215 please contact Dr. Karolina Serafin. Credit given for only one of the following: M215 or M200-M250.

FRIT M222: Topics in Italian Culture

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
13195TR2:30-3:45FA 010M Scalabrini

This class provides COLL A&H, COLL Global Civ & Culture, and GenEd A&H, GenEd World Cultures credits

This course is taught in English.

This course aims to provide a comprehensive introduction to the key aspects constituting the distinctive culture of the Italian Renaissance. We will first focus on the foundational event of the Renaissance—namely, the rediscovery and conscious imitation of ancient ‘classical’ Latin and Greek languages, literatures, cultural artifacts—and we will then analyze the ways in which this rebirth informed and transformed the languages, literatures, arts, philosophies and politics of Italy and Europe at the dawn of the modern era. A key concern will be to demonstrate that each aspect of Renaissance culture (from the new concept of education to the celebration of the dignity of humankind, including women; from the new theories of literary style to the revolution in the visual arts; from the new views on politics to the geographical and cosmological explorations) can be linked to the recovery of classical antiquity. Another key concern will be to demonstrate that while the Renaissance was ‘elitist’ in that only a few highly-educated people could engage in this revolution, it produced far reaching and long-lasting consequences that still inform the way people speak, read, write and study languages, literatures and cultures in modern western cultures. Students will write two critical essays, take six quizzes and a final exam.

FRIT M238: Visual, Musical, and Literary Culture in Italy (3 cr.)
Second Eight Weeks Course
Modern Italian Cinema: A Never-Ending Challenge

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
35919TR4:00-6:30SY 0013Antonio Vitti

This class provides COLL A&H, GenEd A&H, and GenEd World Cultures credits

This course is taught in English.

This course is a survey of Italian cinema from the nineties to the present. It analyzes works by a number of different directors, including well known directors such as Bellocchio, Amelio, Salvatores, Moretti, Sorrentino, Garrone, Virzi and Archibugi whose films are representative of sociopolitical trends in the Italian culture of the time. Students will learn how to perform critical reading of visual texts, and will be provided with cinematic terminology and a recent bibliography on the subject. Special attention is devoted to new Italian comedy, new authors and the phenomenon of neo-neorealism.

Students view seven films in Italian with subtitles. The format includes lectures, screenings, and in-class discussions.

In-depth examination of Italian culture, focusing on Italy's role in the development of the Western creative tradition. May focus on a period rich in artistic and literary production; the development of visual, musical and literary media over time; or the changing relationship between traditional artistic media and their modern counterparts.

FRIT M250: Intermediate Italian II (3 cr.)

Number Days Time Room Instructor
2812 MWF 10:10-11:00 BH 015 L Dolasinski
2813 MWF 1:25-2:15 WY 101 L Bonaiti
2814 MWF 11:15-12:05 BH 331 L Dolasinski

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: M200 or equivalent.

This second-year Italian course meets three times a week and builds upon the first three semesters of beginning and intermediate Italian (or equivalent). In M250, students concentrate on learning how to express their ideas and debate the pros and cons of certain situations as well as to offer advice and express opinions on a variety of familiar subjects, all in the Italian language. The students are involved in a variety of tasks practicing speaking, writing, listening and reading in a cultural context. The course includes study of original Italian short movies that offer the first stimulus for learning intermediate-level vocabulary, grammar and culture.

Online Class: This Intermediate II Italian course is interactive and conducted completely online. The students do not need to be on campus in order to participate. It requires students to work independently and follow a very structured syllabus. The class meets with the instructor online once a week; meeting hours are flexible. The students are involved in a variety of online tasks at the intermediate level, such as reading, listening, completing exercises, posting writing assignments and recording responses. All the activities are integrated into a larger cultural context. The grammar focuses on intermediate level structures, such as subjunctives.

FRIT M301: Italian Reading and Expression (4 cr.)
Heroes and Anti-heroes

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
4605MTWRF10:10-11:00JH A105Lucia Gemmani & Karolina Serafin

Prerequisite: M250, M215, equivalent course, or consent of instructor.

Conducted in Italian, this course continues the study of advanced structures through a variety of media and authentic texts. While the focus is on accuracy and fluency in speaking, practice with other skills and the study of Italian culture will be integrated throughout.

In Italian culture, heroes and villains have been present from antiquity to present times across history, fairy tales, comic books, literature, cinema, politics, and everyday life. In this course, we will explore the heroes and the anti-heroes of Italy by reading, watching, and listening to a variety of cultural artifacts, while mastering Italian grammar and vocabulary.

FRIT M311: Italian film and culture (3 cr.)
The Cinema of Dissent: a Never-Ending Challenge
Joint-offered with MSCH-F 398, EURO-W 406

Number Days Time Room Instructor
8725 TR 11:15-12:30 BH 139 Antonio Vitti

This class provides CASE A&H, CASE Global Civ & Culture credits

M311 is in English; optional film showings on Thursdays

This Italian cinema course aims to engage the participants in intense academic discussion to interpret and understand through the formidable vehicle of cinema, Italy’s experience with globalization, economic challenges, migration, corruption, organized crime and neo-capitalism in the new millennium. The films and readings will also include issues which challenge Italian democracy, political unity, and the right to work. Readings will be in English, including testimonials, interviews, reviews, blogs, and short excerpts from various sources.

FRIT M390: Studies in Italian Film (3 cr.)
Italian Cinema from the Silent Era to the Present

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
30729TR9:30-10:45BH 229Antonio Vitti

M390 is in Italian

“Italian Cinema from the Silent Era to the Present” provides an overview of Italy’s rich cinema tradition starting from silent masterpieces and the groundbreaking years Neorealism, born at the time when the nation was rising from the wreckage of World War II. Thanks to the poetics of Neorealism, Italian cinema became a point of reference for world cinema. In this course we will watch masterpieces that have become milestones in world cinema by authors such as Roberto Rossellini, Federico Fellini, Pier Paolo Pasolini and Michelangelo Antonioni, Carlo Verdone, Paolo Sorrentino and Matteo Garrone.

FRIT M450: Seminar in Italian Literature (3 cr.)
Journeys in Contemporary Italy

Number Days Time Room Instructor
30730 TR 1:00-2:15 BH 314 Karolina Serafin

This class provides COLL A&H credits

Prerequisite: M305, M306, M307, M308, M390 or consent of instructor.

Travel, discovery, exploration and the unknown have always fascinated human kind: travel through space and time; through life and the afterlife; through labyrinths and emptiness. In this course, we will explore different kinds of travel in Italian art, music, literature, comic books, and films, focusing on Italian society and culture from the 1960’s to the present. We will discover what Italian literature and culture have in common with Jack Kerouac and the ways in which Italians have been trying to escape the labyrinth of contemporary reality.

“Our battered suitcases were piled on the sidewalk again; we had longer ways to go. But no matter, the road is life.” (from Jack Kerouac, On the Road)

FRIT X493: Individual Readings in Italian Literature (1-3 cr.)

Number Day/Time Instructor
2815 Arranged Massimo Scalabrini

Independent study on a specific topic not taught in one of this semester's regular courses. If interested, complete the permission form.

FRIT M499: Reading for Honors (3 cr.)

Number Day/Time Instructor
2816 Arranged Massimo Scalabrini

For students preparing an honors project to receive a degree with departmental honors in Italian.

Interdisciplinary Courses

HON H-233: Great Authors, Composers and Artists (3 cr.)
Tragedy: When Life Imitates Art

Number Days Time Room Instructor
13090 TR 11:15-12:30 HU 108 Hall Bjornstad

Fulfills GenEd A&H and COLL (CASE) A&H Breadth of Inquiry credits

What do we mean when we say that an event is tragic? Is a death more tragic if it is the result of a murder than if it happened by accident or from natural causes? Do we say it is tragic in order to make sense of it or as a way of saying that we give up to explain it? Is it an expression of absence of meaning or pointing toward a logic of a different order? Is tragedy linked to a sense of justice or does it respond to the lack of justice? What role do religion, politics and chance play in our perception of life’s misery? And why has tragedy always been so central to popular culture, from the public performances of ancient Greece to the rise and fall of celebrities like Aaron Hernandez and Amy Winehouse? Indeed, how can we explain the pleasure we get from regarding the pain of others? In this course, we will address questions like these, as a way to explore tragedy in its relation to life, art, death and hope.

Material studied will include world famous literary works from the Bible, Greek tragedies, F. Scott Fitzgerald, examples from film and TV series (including the 1995 film by Mathieu Kassovitz, La Haine/ Hate; episodes from The Wire and Scandal), as well as critical texts related to the questions above, from Aristotle and Nietzsche to contemporary thinkers like Susan Sontag and Stanley Cavell. Special emphasis will be put on the idea of tragedy in the twenty-first century, in both critical writing and artistic production (and pursued by the students in final research projects).

COLL-C 103: Critical Approaches: Arts & Humanities
Cloak and Dagger (3 cr.)

Number Days Time Room Instructor
8418 TR 11:15-12:05 WH 120 Marco Arnaudo
8425 F 12:20-1:10 AC C118 Rosa Borgonovi
9562 F 12:20-1:10 AC C107 Francesco Samarini
8426 F 1:25-02:15 AC C118 Rosa Borgonovi
9563 F 1:25-02:15 AC C107 Francesco Samarini
8427 F 2:30-3:20 AC C107 Francesco Samarini
9561 F 2:30-3:20 AC C118 Rosa Borgonovi

Fulfills GenEd A&H and COLL (CASE) A&H Breadth of Inquiry and Critical Approaches credits

This course introduces students to one of the most basic concepts of literary criticism - literary genres - with specific reference to a popular genre such as the so-called "thriller." "Thriller" is a term that came into use in the late nineteenth century and was applied not only to the detective story, the most famous examples of which were A. Conan Doyle's tales about Sherlock Holmes, but also to a closely related literary genre, the spy novel, that also attained great popularity during the period.

The primary focus of this course will be to teach students how to understand the conventions and traditions that govern any literary genre, with specific reference to the "thriller" as exemplified by selected detective and spy stories in both literature and film. Attention will be paid to critical concepts such as style, form, structure, point of view, and implied reader, in order to provide students with analytical tools that will be valuable in the years to come. It is my hope that students will apply the lessons they learn about genre in this class to any literary genre, not only genres typical of popular culture.

Readings will include the detective fiction of Poe, Conan Doyle, Agatha Christie, Raymond Chandler, and Friedrich Dürrenmatt. We will also examine several detective-mystery movies, including the recent Sherlock Holmes (2009), and the classic masterpieces of the noir tradition, including The Maltese Falcon and The Big Sleep. For the spy genre, we will read the pre-Cold War novel A Coffin for Dimitrios, a James Bond novel by Ian Fleming, and a Cold War spy novel by John Le Carré. In addition, we will screen two very different James Bond films: one made during the height of the Cold War, and Martin Campbell's Casino Royale (2006).



Summer 2018

First Six-Week Session
Tuesday, May 8–Friday, June 15

FRIT F100: Elementary French I (4 cr.)

NumberDaysTimesInstructor
13066 Online meetings onlyMW 9:30-10:45am
OR MW 6:00-7:15pm
Chase Tiffany

Please submit the form here for permission to enroll in the above 100% online class. See our Online Courses page ("About Online Courses" tab) for more information.

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Introduction to French language and selected aspects of French civilization and culture. Credit given for only one of F100, F115, or F491.

FRIT F200: Second-Year French I: Language and Culture (3 cr.)

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
4090MTWRF11:00-12:15BH 148Apoorva Sarmal

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: F150 or equivalent. Grammar, composition, conversation coordinated with the study of cultural texts. Credit given for only one of the following third-semester courses: F200 or F265.

FRIT X490: Individual Readings in French (1-3 cr.)

NumberDay/TimeInstructor
4096ArrangedMassimo Scalabrini

Independent study on a specific topic not taught in one of the department's regular courses. If interested, complete the permission form and bring it to the staff area in GISB 3169. You may also scan and email the completed form to the department.

FRIT F491: Elementary French for Graduate Students (3-4 cr.)

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructorNotes
4092MTWRF11:00-12:15BH 209Jacob Ladygaundergraduate students (4 cr.)
4093MTWRF11:00-12:15BH 209Jacob Ladygagraduate students (3 cr.)

Although this course is designed for graduate students who seek to develop reading knowledge of French, it is also open to undergraduate students. However, it will not count toward the French major or minor, and it will not count toward fulfilling the undergraduate language requirement. The course provides an introduction to structures of the language necessary for reading, followed by reading in graded texts of a general nature. Credit given for only one of F491 or any French course at the 100-level.

FRIT M100: Elementary Italian I (4 cr.)

NumberInstructorNotesTime
7405 Marzia BagnascoOnline course meetingsMW 9:30-10:45AM or
MW 6:00-7:15PM

See our Online Courses page ("About Online Courses" tab) for more information.

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Introduction to contemporary Italian language, geography, and culture. Involves a broad variety of assignments and activities that develop grammatical competency and proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Cultural topics and simple cultural comparisons are introduced. Credit given for only one of the following: M100, M110, M115, or M491.

This beginning Italian course is interactive and conducted completely online. The students do not need to be on campus in order to participate. It requires students to work independently and follow a very structured syllabus. The students are involved in a variety of online tasks such as reading, listening, completing exercises, posting writing assignments and recording responses. All the activities are integrated into a larger cultural context. The grammar focuses on present and simple past tense, allowing the students to speak and write in simple sentences about familiar topics with accuracy and fluency, employing basic conversational strategies.

FRIT M200: Intermediate Italian I (3 cr.)

NumberInstructorNotesTime
7540 Francesco SamariniOnline course meetings TR 9:30-10:45AM
OR TR 6:00-7:15PM

Please contact Professor Karolina Serafin for permission to enroll in the above online class. See our Online Courses page ("About Online Courses" tab) for more information.

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: M110, M115, M150, or equivalent.

This intermediate Italian course is interactive and conducted completely online. The students concentrate on reviewing and refining structures learned at the 100-level, but this time at an intermediate level. During the semester students are involved in a variety of tasks practicing speaking, writing, listening and reading in cultural context. The course features study of original Italian short movies that offer the first stimulus for learning intermediate-level vocabulary, grammar and culture. Credit given for only one of M200 or M215.

FRIT X493: Individual Readings in Italian Literature (1-3 cr.)

NumberDay/TimeInstructor
4102ArrangedMassimo Scalabrini

Independent study on a specific topic not taught in one of the department's regular courses. If interested, complete the permission form and bring it to the staff area in GISB 3169. You may also scan and email the completed form to the department.

COLL-C 103: Critical Approaches: Arts & Humanities
European Roots of Modernity (3 cr.)

Number Days Time Room Instructor
13669 MTWR 1:00-2:30 BH 208 Marco Arnaudo

Fulfills GenEd A&H and COLL (CASE) A&H Breadth of Inquiry and Critical Approaches credits

This class examines the history, literature, and philosophy of the European Renaissance - circa 1520s to 1620s. We will examine the intersection of culture, context, ideology, and literary creativity in the Renaisance through classic texts from Italy, France, Spain, and England. We will also discuss key concepts about identity, society, politics, and religion which originated in this period and had a huge influence in the following centuries. In the process, we will come to discover how the Renaissance contributed to shape the way we think about ourselves and the world even today.

The class will alternate short lectures with close readings of texts and student-centered activities. In particular, we will make use of roleplaying games (which, incidentally, were invented in 16th-century Italy) to learn about pivotal moments in European history and acquire a deeper appreciation of the clashes of ideas behind them.

Second Six-Week Session
Monday, June 18–Friday, July 27

FRIT F150: Elementary French II: Language and Culture (4 cr.)

NumberDaysTimesInstructor
7840Online meetingsMW 9:30-10:45AM OR
MW 6:00-7:15PM
Shawn Gasseling

Please submit the form here for permission to enroll in the above 100% online class. See our Online Courses page ("About Online Courses" tab) for more information.

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: F100. Basic structures of the French language and selected topics of French civilization and culture. Credit given for only one of the following: F115, F150, or F491.

FRIT F250: Second-Year French II: Language and Culture (3 cr.)

NumberInstructorNotesTime
4091 Taylor MacDonaldOnline course meetings TR 9:30-10:45AM
OR TR 6:00-7:15PM

Please submit the form here for permission to enroll in the above 100% online class. See our Online Courses page ("About Online Courses" tab) for more information.

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: F200 or equivalent. Grammar, composition, conversation coordinated with the study of cultural texts. Credit given for only one of the following fourth-semester courses: F250 or F265.

FRIT X490: Individual Readings in French (1-3 cr.)

NumberDay/TimeInstructor
4097ArrangedMassimo Scalabrini

Independent study on a specific topic not taught in one of the department's regular courses. If interested, complete the permission form and bring it to the staff area in GISB 3169. You may also scan and email the completed form to the department.

FRIT F492: Reading French for Graduate Students (3-4 cr.)

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructorNotes
4094MTWRF11:00-12:15BH 209Laura Demseyundergraduate students (4 cr.)
4095MTWRF11:00-12:15BH 209Laura Demseygraduate students (3 cr.)

Prerequisite: F491 or consent of department. Although this course is designed for graduate students who seek to develop reading knowledge of French, it is also open to undergraduate students. However, it will not count toward the French major or minor, and it will not count toward fulfilling the undergraduate language requirement. The course includes a continuation of language and reading development from F491.

FRIT M150: Elementary Italian II (4 cr.)

NumberInstructorNotesTime
7539 Giorgio LosiOnline courseMW 9:30-10:45AM OR
MW 6:00-7:15PM

Please contact Professor Karolina Serafin for permission to enroll in the above online class. See our Online Courses page ("About Online Courses" tab) for more information.

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: M100.

Continued introduction to contemporary Italian language, geography, and culture. Involves a broad variety of assignments and activities that build grammatical competency and proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Practice with new cultural topics and basic cultural analysis. Credit given for only one of the following: M110, M115, M150, or M491.

This second-semester Italian course is interactive and conducted completely online. The students do not need to be on campus in order to participate. It requires students to work independently and follow a very structured syllabus. The students are involved in a variety of online tasks such as reading, listening, completing exercises, posting writing assignments and recording responses. All the activities are integrated into a larger cultural context. The grammar focuses on past and future tense, allowing the students to speak and write in simple sentences about familiar topics with accuracy and fluency.

FRIT M250: Intermediate Italian II (3 cr.)

NumberInstructorNotesTime
7541 Pietro TripanoOnline courseTR 9:30-10:45AM OR
TR 6:00-7:15PM

Please contact Professor Karolina Serafin for permission to enroll in the above online class. See our Online Courses page ("About Online Courses" tab) for more information.

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: M200 or equivalent.

This second-year Italian course is conducted entirely online and builds upon the first three semesters of beginning and intermediate Italian (or equivalent). In M250, students concentrate on learning how to express their ideas and debate the pros and cons of certain situations as well as to offer advice and express opinions on a variety of familiar subjects, all in the Italian language. The students are involved in a variety of tasks practicing speaking, writing, listening and reading in a cultural context. The course includes study of original Italian short movies that offer the first stimulus for learning intermediate-level vocabulary, grammar and culture.

FRIT X493: Individual Readings in Italian Literature (1-3 cr.)

NumberDay/TimeInstructor
4103ArrangedMassimo Scalabrini

Independent study on a specific topic not taught in one of the department's regular courses. If interested, complete the permission form and bring it to the staff area in GISB 3169. You may also scan and email the completed form to the department.

Intensive Freshman Seminar
Monday, July 30–Tuesday, August 14

COLL-S 103: Arts & Humanities
Arts of War (3 cr.)

Number Days Time Room Instructor
8475 ARR ARR ARR Marco Arnaudo

Above class open to Freshmen only, requires permission

For further information, contact the Intensive Freshman Seminar office at (812) 855-3839

Fulfills GenEd A&H and COLL (CASE) A&H Breadth of Inquiry and Critical Approaches credits

The Greek philosopher Heraclitus described war as “the father and king of us all”; Sun Tzu wrote that understanding war is a matter of life and death, and its study should not be neglected; Machiavelli thought war to be the core element of all politics, and von Clausewitz defined it as an extension of politics by other means. Virtually every human being on Earth has had some contact with war, either by directly participating in it, or by having learned about it through family history or national history and identity. Yet, war as such is rarely addressed as a topic for reflection outside of military academies. Generally speaking, this class intends to expose the students to basic concepts in military history and philosophy, and to encourage them to think critically and in an informed fashion upon the topic of war.

This class approaches the topic of war from a vast variety of perspectives, ranging from military theory and history of warfare to representations of war in fiction, descriptions of war experiences in personal memoires, and dynamic modeling of conflict. In particular, “Arts of War” embraces the recent turn in military history from the search for general patterns in warfare to a nuanced understanding of war as an ever changing expression of time and place, which is shaped by culture as much it shapes culture in return. This class explores various understandings of war in history in their interaction with culture, society, and technology.

This class will allow students to become familiar with many incarnations of war philophy and practice through a selection of relevant texts from the fifth century BCE to the present. The class includes excerpts of key treatises on war (such as Sun Tzu’s Art of War; Machiavelli’s The Prince; von Clausewitz’s On War), essays on the logistical, economic, and technological aspects of war, as well as memoires and works of fiction that describe the experience of war. We will also make ample use of tactical and operational wargames and diplomatic games to gain insights about the complex dynamics of war.



French Courses

FRIT F100: Elementary French I (4 cr.)

Monday, Wednesday, Friday

Number Days Time Room Instructor Notes
2194 MWF 9:05-9:55 WH 002 Jade Liu Hybrid
2199 MWF 10:10-11:00 RE C110 Kelly Kasper-Cushman Hybrid
2195 MWF 11:15-12:05 RE C110 Elke Defever Hybrid
2193 MWF 11:15-12:05 WH 002 Claire Fouchereaux Hybrid
2196 MWF 12:20-1:10 LH 125 Erin Stigers Hybrid
2191 MWF 12:20-1:10 WH 008 Laura Demsey Hybrid
2197 MWF 1:25-2:15 LH 316 Victoria Lagrange Hybrid
2201 MWF 1:25-2:15 SW 217 Marion Velain Hybrid
2200 MWF 2:30-3:20 LH 101 Victoria Lagrange Hybrid

Tuesday, Thursday

Number Days Time Room Instructor Notes
2192 TR 7:15-8:45PM SY 004 Erin Stigers Hybrid

Online Class

Number Instructor Notes
*2198 Kelly Kasper-Cushman Online meetings Tuesdays
either 11:15am-12:30pm or 7:15-8:30pm

*Please submit the form here for permission to enroll in the above 100% online class. See our Online Courses page ("About Online Courses" tab) for more information about teaching and learning methods.

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Introduction to French language and selected aspects of French civilization and culture. Credit given for only one of F100, F115, or F491.

See textbook info here.(click on the "textbooks" tab on the top right)

FRIT F115: Accelerated Elementary French (4 cr.)

Number Days Time Room Instructor
2202 MTWR 11:15-12:05 SW 103 Amanda Vredenburgh

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: Obtain authorization from department.

An accelerated treatment of material covered in both F100 and F150 designed for superior students and students with previous training in another foreign language. Credit given for only one of F115 and F100; Credit given for only one of F115 and F150. If interested, please fill out the online authorization form.

See textbook info here.(click on the "textbooks" tab on the top right)

FRIT F150: Elementary French II: Language and Culture (4 cr.)

Monday, Wednesday, Friday

Number Days Time Room Instructor Notes
2204 MWF 9:05-9:55 SE 245 Apoorva Sarmal hybrid
2207 MWF 10:10-11:00 JH A106 Apoorva Sarmal hybrid
2205 MWF 11:15-12:05 FA 010 Sneha Ravichandran hybrid
2208 MWF 1:25-2:15 GA 0003 Jill Owen hybrid
2209 MWF 1:25-2:15 SY 212 Timothy Lomeli hybrid
2206 MWF 2:30-3:20 SY 0013 Noëmie Sollier hybrid

Monday, Wednesday, Thursday

Number Days Time Room Instructor Notes
2203 MWR 8:00-8:50AM SY 004 Scott Kunkel Hybrid

Tuesday, Thursday Evenings

Number Days Time Room Instructor Notes
2211 TR 7:15-8:45PM GA 0013 Chase Tiffany Traditional

Online Class

Number Instructor Notes
*2210 Jill Owen Online meetings Thursdays
either 11:15am-12:30pm OR 7:15-8:30pm

*Please submit the form here for permission to enroll in the above 100% online class. See our Online Courses page ("About Online Courses" tab) for more information about teaching and learning methods.

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: F100.

Basic structures of the French language and selected topics of French civilization and culture. Credit given for only one of the following: F115, F150, or F491.

See textbook info here.(click on the "textbooks" tab on the top right)

FRIT F152: Beginning French Conversation II (1 cr.)

Number Day/Time Instructor
31766 Arranged Kelly Sax

Corequisite: F150.

This companion course to F150 gives beginning students the opportunity to practice conversational French in a relaxed setting with peers. Led by advanced students of French working under faculty guidance, group activities may include discussion, games, magazine/newspaper/movie discussions, cultural events, cooking, etc. S/F grading. No credit for French major.

FRIT F200: Second-Year French I: Language and Culture (3 cr.)

Monday, Wednesday, Friday

Number Days Time Room Instructor
2213 MWF 9:05-9:55 LH 316 Taylor MacDonald
2215 MWF 10:10-11:00 BH 006 Shawn Gasseling
2214 MWF 11:15-12:05 BH 321 Shawn Gasseling
2216 MWF 12:20-1:10 LH 004 Ludovic Mompelat
2218 MWF 12:20-1:10 WH 002 Georgy Khabarovskiy
2217 MWF 1:25-2:15 SW 219 Charlène Gilbert
2219 MWF 2:30-3:20 SW 103 Charlène Gilbert
2220 MWF 2:30-3:20 SY 004 Taylor MacDonald

Monday, Wednesday, Thursday

Number Days Time Room Instructor
*2221* MWR 8:00-8:50AM *section canceled*

Evenings

Number Days Time Room Instructor
2222 TR 7:15-8:30PM GA 0005 Ludovic Mompelat

Online

Number Instructor Notes
*2212 Georgy Khabarovskiy Online meetings Tuesdays
either 11:15am-12:30pm OR 7:15-8:30pm

*Please submit the form here for permission to enroll in the above 100% online class. See our Online Courses page ("About Online Courses" tab) for more information about teaching and learning methods.

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: F150 or equivalent.

Grammar, composition, conversation coordinated with the study of cultural texts. Credit given for only one of the following third-semester courses: F200 or F265.

See textbook info here.(click on the "textbooks" tab on the top right)

FRIT F202: Intermediate French Conversation I (1 cr.)

Number Day/Time Instructor
31767 Arranged Kelly Sax

Corequisite: F200.

This companion course to F200 gives intermediate students the opportunity to practice conversational French in a relaxed setting with peers. Led by advanced students of French working under faculty guidance, group activities may include discussion, games, magazine/newspaper/movie discussions, cultural events, cooking, etc. S/F grading. No credit for French major.

FRIT F226: French Society (3 cr.)
The French Melting Pot

Number Days Time Room Instructor
13073 TR 5:45-7:00 BH 219 Oana Panaïté

This class provides IUB GenEd World Culture credit, IUB GenEd S&H credit, COLL (CASE)S&H Breadth of Inquiry Credit, and COLL (CASE) Global Civ & Culture credits

This course introduces students to contemporary culture in France from the perspective of the country’s highly secular, “color-blind” approach to immigration. Students examine the integration of various immigrant groups from the early modern period to the present (e.g. European Jews, residents of its former colonies, citizens of the European Union), comparing it to the more multi-cultural approach to diversity found in the US. Students demonstrate their understanding of the complexities of French “melting pot” traditions and their effects on society in general -- as well as the ability to compare and contrast these traditions with American approaches -- through oral, written, and videotaped reports based on class materials and individual research.

Taught in English--No prerequisites

FRIT F250: Second-Year French II: Language and Culture (3 cr.)

Monday, Wednesday, Friday

Number Days Time Room Instructor
2224 MWF 9:05-9:55 GA 0003 Evie Munier
10126 MWF 10:10-11:00 GA 0003 Evie Munier
2226 MWF 12:20-1:10 JH A105 Cris Robu
2227 MWF 1:25-2:15 EP 256 Aiko Okamoto-MacPhail
2228 MWF 2:30-3:20 JH A105 Scott Evans
2223 MWF 3:35-4:25 LH 025 Scott Evans

Evenings

Number Days Time Room Instructor
2229 MW 7:15-8:30PM GA 0005 Georgy Khabarovskiy

Online Class

Number Instructor Notes
*9331 Cris Robu Online meetings Thursdays
either 11:15am-12:30pm OR 7:15-8:30pm

*Please submit the form here for permission to enroll in the above 100% online class. See our Online Courses page ("About Online Courses" tab) for more information about teaching and learning methods.

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: F200 or equivalent.

Grammar, composition, conversation coordinated with the study of cultural texts. Credit given for only one of the following fourth-semester courses: F250 or F265.

See textbook info here.(click on the "textbooks" tab on the top right)

FRIT F252: Intermediate French Conversation II (1 cr.)

Number Day/Time Instructor
31769 Arranged Kelly Sax

Corequisite: F250.

This companion course to F250 gives intermediate students the opportunity to practice conversational French in a relaxed setting with peers. Led by advanced students of French working under faculty guidance, group activities may include discussion, games, magazine/newspaper/movie discussions, cultural events, cooking, etc. S/F grading. No credit for French major.

FRIT F300: French and Francophone Studies: Introduction (3 cr.)

This class provides COLL (CASE) A&H Breadth of Inquiry credit

Prerequisite: F250, F265, or consent of department.

Number Days Time Room Instructor Notes
6741 MWF 10:10-11:00 LH 023 Amanda Vredenburgh L'Imagination dans la littérature et le cinéma français
**2232 MWF 11:15-12:05 LH 416   **This section has been canceled
2230 TR 9:30-10:45 GA 0009 Brett Bowles Life Writing, Media, and Identity in Contemporary France
6328 MW 4:00-5:15 FA 010 Jill Owen L’Encadrement, l’espace et l’identité dans la littérature francophone
2231
34238 (Hutton honors section)
TR 2:30-3:45 GA 0009 Guillaume Ansart Histoires étranges et cruelles 

**Section #2232 has been canceled

Amanda Vredenburgh

L’Imagination dans la littérature et le cinéma français

Dans ce cours d’introduction à la littérature et au cinéma français, nous explorerons des questions concernant l’imagination et ces usages, telles que : comment l’imagination pourrait-elle contribuer ou faire obstacle à l’amour ? Où se trouve la frontière entre l’imagination et la folie ? Avons-nous perdu tout sens de l’imagination dans le monde moderne ? En route, nous découvrirons une grande variété d’œuvres, des grands du XIXe siècle comme Baudelaire et Maupassant, aux classiques du cinéma français comme Le Fabuleux destin d’Amélie Poulain, jusqu’au romancier contemporain Milan Kundera. À travers l’étude de films, de nouvelles, de poèmes en prose, de tableaux, d’une bande dessinée et d’un court roman, les étudiants s’amélioreront leurs capacités analytiques ainsi que leur expression orale et écrite en français. Les travaux comprendront une explication de texte, un examen de mi-semestre, un exposé oral, et un travail analytique de 5 pages.

Brett Bowles

Life Writing, Media, and Identity in Contemporary France

Individual yet socially constrained, ever in flux and transformable via action and word, identity today is constructed largely though media of various types. By examining various forms of autobiography in prose, graphic novel, music, and film, this course focuses on the ways in which individuals from a wide range of racial, ethnic, and class backgrounds—for example, a Moroccan-born cleaning lady / single mother; a Black bank robber-turned-rapper / actor; and the White former editor-in-chief of Elle magazine—narrate their lives and construct their identities. Doing so will not only provide a basis for thinking through the aesthetic / formal and ethical dimensions of adapting a written narrative for the screen; it will also allow us to assess the relative weight of race, gender, ethnicity, and class in French society today. Texts will include a selection of the following : Fatima El Ayoubi’s memoir Prière aux étoiles (2006) and Philippe Faucon’s film Fatima (2013) ; MC Jean Gab’1’s rap album Ma Vie (2003) and his autobiographical novel Sur la tombe de ma mère (2013); excerpts from rapper / actor / director Abd Al Malik’s albums Gibraltar (2006), Dante (2008), and Château Rouge (2010), his autobiographical novel Qu’Allah bénisse la France (2004); and his 2014 film of the same title; François Bégaudeau’s novel Entre les Murs and Laurent Cantet’s 2008 screen adaptation; Jean-Philippe Bauby’s memoir Le Scaphandre et le papillon (1997) and Julian Schnabel’s screen adaptation (2007); Marjane Satrapi’s graphic novel Persepolis (2001) and the 2007 film version by Vincent Paronnaud and Satrapi.

Jill Owen

L’Encadrement, l’espace et l’identité dans la littérature francophone

Description et objectifs :

Dans la littérature en générale, on poursuit sans cesse la question de l’identité – d’un personnage, d’un narrateur, d’un auteur, d’un lecteur – qui veut souvent s’étendre à l’identité d’un peuple entier. Pour approfondir notre compréhension d’une identité, nous pouvons nous poser les questions suivantes :

  • Qu’est-ce qui comprend l’identité d’une personne ou d’un personnage?
  • Comment l’espace personnel de cette personne réfléchit-il cette identité?
  • Comment est-ce qu’un narrateur, un auteur ou un artiste emploie l’encadrement narratif pour mettre en relief l’espace et l’identité

Une façon de parvenir à une définition plus concrète de l’identité serait à travers l’espace de quelqu’un dont les objets représentent ce qui est plus important dans sa vie. Dans une tentative d’examiner ces questions, ce cours se concentrera sur l’encadrement du soi dans les textes francophones du Moyen Âge jusqu’à aujourd’hui. Nous explorerons la composition d’une identité à travers l’espace décrit dans le théâtre, le roman, la poésie, l’essai et la bande dessinée francophones.

Guillaume Ansart

Histoires étranges et cruelles

Introduction à l’analyse littéraire. Nous lirons cinq nouvelles fantastiques, étranges et/ou cruelles écrites au 19e siècle : trois histoires courtes (Sarrasine de Balzac, La Vénus d’Ille de Prosper Mérimée et La Légende de Saint Julien l’Hospitalier de Flaubert) et deux plus longues (Colomba de Mérimée et Jettatura de Théophile Gautier). Nous lirons aussi en parallèle de courts poèmes lyriques du 19e siècle et du début du 20e siècle par Victor Hugo, Baudelaire, Verlaine, Rimbaud, Paul Valéry, Apollinaire et Paul Éluard. Note finale : deux examens et deux devoirs écrits.

(Prerequisite: F250, F255, F265, or consent of department.)

FRIT F305: Stage and Page (3 cr.)
Theater of the World **CANCELED

Number Days Time Room Instructor
**31736 TR 9:30-10:45 GA 0009 **This class has been canceled

This class provides COLL (CASE) A&H Breadth of Inquiry credit

Prerequisite: F300

This course invites you on a virtual journey through the reading of essays in French literature and the viewing of old maps in the genre of the atlas called Theater of the World (Theatrum orbis mundi). We start with two plays: Phèdre by Jean Racine and Hernani by Victor Hugo and study Europe. Then we fly to a large and expanding world. We will read an excerpt from the travelogue of the first French navigator who sailed around the world, Louis-Antoine Bougainville, and the first two chapters of an essay inspired by him: Denis Diderot’s Supplément au voyage de Bougainville. Through maps, we continue to the last navigator of the French monarchy Jean-François de Galaup de Lapérouse and his map of California with excerpts from his travelogue. After Lapérouse, who mapped the entire world a year before the French Revolution, we will read Chateaubriand, who set his short stories in the exotic America. After Chateaubriand (1768-1848), travel would soon become a French middle-class pleasure. We will end the semester with Eugène Labiche’s play about family travel, Le Voyage de monsieur Perrichon.

We will hold some classes in the Lilly Library and consult its collection of old maps.

The grade will be based on your own two essays with rewrites and one in-class presentation of your essay project.

FRIT F313: Advanced Grammar (3 cr.)

Number Days Time Room Instructor
2233 MWF 1:25-2:15 GA 0007 Kelly Kasper-Cushman
2234 MWF 10:10-11:00 FA 010 Kevin Rottet

Prerequisite: F250, F265 or equivalent

Kelly Kasper-Cushman

This course is designed to (a) build upon the intermediate student’s existing knowledge of major French grammar points through intensive study and (b) develop a more sophisticated mastery of advanced structures. F313 can serve either as a complimentary grammar course to be taken simultaneously with F300 or as a springboard course preparing the student for F300 and beyond (including possible study abroad). We will supplement the text, Contrastes (Rochat, 2nd Edition), and the Workbook with supplemental readings and materials from French and Francophone culture and current events. Grades will be based on daily preparation and homework, class participation, short writing assignments, quizzes, a midterm exam, and a cumulative final exam.

Kevin Rottet

This course is designed to (a) build upon the intermediate student’s existing knowledge of major French grammar points through intensive study and (b) develop a more sophisticated mastery of advanced structures in preparation for F300 and beyond (including possible study abroad). By the end of this course, students should be able not only to speak and write more precisely on a range of topics but also to read and produce literary and academic writing with greater ease. We will supplement the text, Contrastes (Rochat, 2nd Edition), and the Workbook with supplemental readings and materials from French and Francophone culture (e.g., newspaper and magazine articles, literary works, film). Grades will be based on daily preparation and homework, class participation, short writing assignments, quizzes, tests, and a cumulative final exam.

FRIT F314: Creative and Critical Writing in French (3 cr.)

Number Days Time Room Instructor
11558 TR 4:00-5:15 GA 0013 Margot Gray

In this introduction to creative and critical writing in French, our primary goal will be the development and improvement of writing skills through various short creative and critical pieces. Emphasis will be placed on field activity and engagement with the many resources offered by IU (French-inflected dramatic and musical productions, films, museum exhibits) as sources of inspiration, both creative and critical. Such field activities will include a variety of exercises: the brief autobiography of a chosen object; a dialogue inspired by conversation overheard in a crowded campus café; nature writing on the banks of the arboretum pond, among other writing projects. Creative pieces will include a short story and a surrealist poem.

FRIT F315: The Sounds and Rhythms of French (4 cr.)

Number Days Time Room Instructor Notes
2235 TR 11:15-12:05 BH 322 Kelly Sax Lecture
2236 MW 10:10-11:00 FQ 012B Martin Maillot Drill
2237 TR 10:10-11:00 LH 328 Martin Maillot Drill

French F315 has three objectives: (1) to develop students' communicative skills by practice in listening comprehension and conversational practice; (2) to improve students' pronunciation accuracy and oral fluency and to train them to evaluate their own pronunciation; (3) to learn about the sound system and its role in the grammar and vocabulary of the language, and also as a marker of social and geographical identity. The focus will be on the pronunciation of Standard French, that is, the speech of the educated Parisian that serves as a model in the French speaking world. However, students will be introduced to salient features of other varieties of French. The course meets four times weekly: two lectures with the professor, and two practice sessions with an associate instructor. All components of the course are taught in French.

The course meets four times weekly: two lectures with the professor, and two practice sessions with an associate instructor. All components of the course are taught in French. Prerequisite is FRIT F 250 or equivalent. Students choose one of two drill sections and attend drill plus lecture.

FRIT F362: La France 1500-1800 (3 cr.)
1st 8 weeks only

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
13074 TR4:00-6:30pmGA 0009Alison Calhoun

This class provides COLL (CASE) A&H Breadth of Inquiry and COLL (CASE) Global Civ & Culture credits

Prerequisite: F300

This course will introduce students to a cultural history of France from the Renaissance to the Revolution. We will draw from diverse artefacts from France’s rich history to study new forms of political power, sociability, and religious creeds, along with a variety of cultural phenomena that shaped national identity, popular culture, and daily life. A significant portion of the course will focus on building vocabulary, style, and expression in French, so that students improve their listening, speaking, and writing skills. Grades will be based on two exams, two short essays, and participation in regular class assignments. This course is appropriate for students aiming to widen their knowledge of French history and culture, improve their language skills, or both.

FRIT F363: La France 1800-Aujourd'hui (3 cr.)

Number Days Time Room Instructor
31739 TR 7:15-8:30 BH 105 Brett Bowles

This class provides COLL (CASE) A&H Breadth of Inquiry and COLL (CASE) Global Civ & Culture credits

Prerequisite: F300

This course offers a survey of French political, social, and cultural history from the mid-nineteenth century through the present, focusing on the theme of conflict and illustrated by a series of case studies including: the Second Republic / Revolution of 1848; the Paris Commune (1871); the Dreyfus Affair (1894); the French army mutinies during the First World War (1917); the Popular Front (1934-1938); Collaboration and Resistance during the Nazi Occupation (1940-1944); Decolonization, the Indochinese War (1945-1954) and the Algerian War (1955-1962); debates about race, ethnicity, civil rights, and French national identity (1989-present).

FRIT F375: Thèmes Littéraires et Culturels (3 cr.)
Persecution & Resistance in French Literature

Number Days Time Room Instructor
6105 TR 11:15-12:30 WH 203 Eric MacPhail

This class provides COLL (CASE) A&H Breadth of Inquiry credit, COLL (CASE) Global Civ & Culture credits

Prerequisite: F300 or equivalent.

This course proposes to survey the portrayal of persecution, whether of heretics, witches, or other dissidents, in works of French literature while paying particular attention to how old quarrels resonate in new contexts from the Renaissance to the 20th century. As a consequence, most of the readings will be works of historical fiction and drama which reinterpret past crises in the context of new struggles. We will read Voltaire’s Traité sur la tolérance, Chénier’s tragedy Charles IX ou La Saint-Barthélemy, Zoé Oldenbourg’s historical novel of the Albigensian crusades Les brûlés, and Françoise Mallet-Joris’ novella about the witch trial of Jeanne Harvilier, “Jeanne ou la révolte” in Trois âges de la nuit. In our discussions, we will examine the political function of religious orthodoxy and the relation of religious pluralism to national identity. In the course of the semester students will get a lot of practice reading and writing French and meditating on one of the prime lessons of French history: persecution doesn’t defend truth; it defends power.

FRIT F399: Reading for Honors (1-12 cr.)

Number Day/Time Instructor
2238 Arranged Massimo Scalabrini

For students preparing an honors project to receive a degree with departmental honors in French, contact the Faculty member listed on our honors page, here.

FRIT F402: Intro to French Linguistics (3 cr.)

Number Days Time Room Instructor
31750 TR 1:00-2:15 FA 005 Julie Auger

This class provides CASE N&M Breadth of Inquiry credit

Prerequisite: F313 or F314, or consent of instructor.

In this course, we look at the structure of the French language from the point of view of descriptive linguistics, picking up where ordinary grammar books leave off. We will investigate the building blocks of language from the smallest up the largest units – sounds (phonetics and phonology), word structure (morphology), sentence structure (syntax), meaning (semantics), and how it all adds up to make meaning on the larger level ( discourse/pragmatics) – and see how the French language is both similar in structure to other human languages and unique in its particulars. We will be interested in how native speakers of French think they should speak, but also in how they do speak and in the kind of systematicity that underlies both casual and formal speech. Class lectures, discussion, and homework assignments will be done in French.

The course is open to students with a solid command of written and spoken French (French 313 or 314).

FRIT F443: Great Novels of the 19th Century (3 cr.)
The Figure of the Painter in the 19th-Century French Novel

Number Days Time Room Instructor
31761 TR 2:30-3:45 WH 106 Nicolas Valazza

This class provides COLL (CASE) A&H Breadth of Inquiry credit

In this course, we will read some key fictions and memoirs of the 19th century and early 20th century—Le Chef-d’œuvre inconnu by Honoré de Balzac, La Toison d’or by Théophile Gautier, L’Œuvre by Émile Zola, Mon Journal by Marie Bashkirtseff and Comment Wang-Fô fut sauvé by Marguerite Yourcenar—focusing on the figure of the painter as a literary character. The purpose of the course is to examine how the art of painting unveils some unexpected aspects of the art of the novel, while also unfolding some essential literary issues of the century: the status of the artist in society, gender roles in the novel, realism, naturalism, impressionism and orientalism, etc. Our readings will be supported by visual examples taken from painters mentioned or implied in the texts: Peter Paul Rubens, Édouard Manet, Paul Cézanne, Marie Bashkirtseff, among others.

The final grade will be based on class preparation and participation (10%), a mid-term composition (25%), an oral presentation (25%) and a final essay (40%). The course will be conducted in French.

FRIT F451: Literature and Arts in French Studies (3 cr.)
Forbidden Passion in Fiction and Film

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
34291TR1:00-2:15GA 0009Margaret Gray

This class provides COLL (CASE) A&H Breadth of Inquiry credit

This course will explore the theme of forbidden passion—its transgressions, implications, and consequences--across a range of temporal and cultural contexts, as well as across varying forms of fiction. We will consider the codes and conventions, the rules and traditions, that construe passion as forbidden--including self-imposed interdiction--within particular circumstances. Attentive to the struggle of internal as well as external social and cultural pressures, we will ask what such love stories tell us about the human heart in the face of individual or collective attempts to control it; about one’s relationship to various cultural dictates; about issues of normativity and conformism confronted by powerful opposing forces. Turning to the films our texts have inspired, we will explore the ways these adaptations interpret their textual sources--as well as what questions our works pose of their cultures and of each other as they negotiate the “eternal return” (title of Cocteau’s adaptation of the “Tristan” legend) of forbidden passion. Our texts and films will include:

  • A novel: Henri-Pierre Roché’s Jules et Jim (1953), adapted by François Truffaut in what was to become an iconic film of the New Wave
  • A fairy tale: Mme LePrince de Beaumont’s 1757 tale, «La Belle et la Bête,” adapted for the screen by Jean Cocteau in 1946
  • A legend: « Tristan et Iseult, » as retold by Joseph Bédier in The Romance of Tristan and Iseult, and modernized in Jean Cocteau’s 1943 adaptation, The Eternal Return
  • A novella: Vercors’s The Silence of the Sea, set during the German occupation of France during World War II, adapted for the screen in 1949 by Jean-Pierre Melville

Assessment of student performance will be based on active class participation; an oral exposé; short reading quizzes; the choice of a midterm essay exam or midterm paper; and the choice of a final exam or final paper.

FRIT X471: French Conversation Group Leadership (1 cr.)

Number Day/Time Instructor
31762 Arranged Kelly Sax

Note: Contact Professor Kelly Sax for permission to enroll in the course.

Under the guidance of their instructor, advanced students of French facilitate weekly French conversation groups for lower level students. Leaders are responsible for planning all group sessions, including discussion topics generated by magazine/newspaper articles and movies, and activities such as games and cooking. No credit for French major. May be repeated for a total of 4 credit hours.

FRIT X490: Individual Readings in French (3 cr.)

Number Day/Time Instructor
2241 Arranged Massimo Scalabrini

Independent study on a specific topic not taught in one of this semester's regular courses. If interested, complete the permission form.

FRIT F491: Elementary French for Graduate Students (3-4 cr.)

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
2239 (undergrad. 4 cr.)
2240 (grad. 3 cr.)
TR7:15-8:45 pmGA 1122Laura Demsey

Open with consent of the instructor to undergraduates who have already completed the language requirement for the B.A. in another language. Introduction to structures of the language necessary for reading, followed by reading in graded texts of a general nature. No credit for the French major or minor. Credit given for only one of F491 or any French course at the 100 level.

FRIT F499: Reading for Honors (1-12 cr.)

Number Day/Time Instructor
2242 Arranged Massimo Scalabrini

For students preparing an honors project to receive a degree with departmental honors in French, contact the Faculty member listed on our honors page, here.

Italian Courses

FRIT M100: Elementary Italian I (4 cr.)

Monday, Wednesday, Friday Hybrid Classes

Number Days Time Room Instructor
2249 MWF 9:05-9:55 WI C111 Sara Dallavalle
2251 MWF 10:10-11:00 LI 031 Alberto Iozzia
*34016 MWF 10:10-11:00 SW 219 Emma Pcolinski
2250 MWF 11:15-12:05 LH 316 Karolina Serafin
10253 MWF 12:20-1:10 LH 101 Alberto Iozzia
2253 MWF 1:25-2:15 PH 012 Lorenzo Bonaiti
2254 MWF 2:30-3:20 LH 004 Lorenzo Bonaiti

*34016 Love, War, and Plague in Italian Literature
Travel back in time! Will a kidnapping, a war, and the black plague stop Renzo and Lucia from living happily ever after? Find out! Learn Italian through the best love story literature has to offer, I Promessi Sposi by Manzoni!

Tuesday, Thursday Evening Class (Traditional)

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
13120TR7:15-8:45 pmJH A105Alberto Iozzia

Online Class

Number Instructor Notes
9815 Giorgio Losi Online meetings Tuesdays
either 9:30-10:45 am OR 6:15-7:30pm

See our Online Courses page ("About Online Courses" tab) for more information.

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Introduction to contemporary Italian language, geography, and culture. Involves a broad variety of assignments and activities that develop grammatical competency and proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Cultural topics and simple cultural comparisons are introduced. Credit given for only one of the following: M100, M110, M115, or M491.

Hybrid course: This is a computer enhanced course, which is a combination of traditional classroom time and online instruction. The course meets in class three days a week and involves independent work by students, a portion of which will be performed online. During the semester, students perform a variety of tasks to practice speaking, writing, listening and reading in a cultural context. The grammar focuses on present and simple past tense, allowing the students to speak and write in simple sentences about familiar topics with accuracy and fluency, employing basic conversational strategies.

Evening class (traditional): This evening section of M100 relies less on computer-based learning than the daytime hybrid sections, while still taking advantage of the enhancements available through the online components of the textbook. During the semester, students perform a variety of tasks to practice speaking, writing, listening and reading in a cultural context. The grammar focuses on present and simple past tense, allowing the students to speak and write in simple sentences about familiar topics with accuracy and fluency, employing basic conversational strategies.

Online Class: This beginning Italian course is interactive and conducted completely online. The students do not need to be on campus in order to participate. It requires students to work independently and follow a very structured syllabus. The class meets with the instructor online once a week; meeting hours are flexible. The students are involved in a variety of online tasks such as reading, listening, completing exercises, posting writing assignments and recording responses. All the activities are integrated into a larger cultural context. The grammar focuses on present and simple past tense, allowing the students to speak and write in simple sentences about familiar topics with accuracy and fluency, employing basic conversational strategies.

See textbook info here.(click on the "textbooks" tab on the top right)

FRIT M115: Accelerated Elementary Italian (4 cr.)

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
*2255MTWR11:15-12:05JH A105Emma Pcolinski

*Love, War, and Plague in Italian Literature
Travel back in time! Will a kidnapping, a war, and the black plague stop Renzo and Lucia from living happily ever after? Find out! Learn Italian through the best love story literature has to offer, I Promessi Sposi by Manzoni!

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Topic: Accelerated Italian & I Promessi Sposi

This intensive beginning course covers the material of two semesters in one (M100 & M150). The course meets four times a week and also involves independent work by students, a portion of which will be performed online. During the semester students are involved in a variety of tasks practicing speaking, writing, listening and reading in a cultural context. The grammar focuses on present, past and future tenses, allowing the students to speak and write in simple sentences about familiar topics with accuracy and fluency. The course is fast-paced it and very rewarding. It is recommended for students with previous experience learning foreign languages (specifically Romance languages).

See textbook info here.(click on the "textbooks" tab on the top right)

FRIT M150: Elementary Italian II (4 cr.)

Hybrid Class

Number Days Time Room Instructor
12619 MWF 11:15-12:05 BH 011 Lorenzo Bonaiti
2256 MWF 1:25-2:15 SW 220 Alberto Iozzia

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: M100.

Continued introduction to contemporary Italian language, geography, and culture. Involves a broad variety of assignments and activities that build grammatical competency and proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Practice with new cultural topics and basic cultural analysis. Credit given for only one of the following: M110, M115, M150, or M491.

Hybrid Class: This is a computer enhanced course, which is a combination of traditional classroom time and online instruction. The course meets three days a week and involves independent work by students, a portion of which will be performed online. This course follows M100 and continues to present the beginning-level concepts of Italian language and culture. During the semester students perform a variety of tasks to practice speaking, writing, listening and reading in a cultural context. The grammar focuses on past and future tense, allowing the students to speak and write in simple sentences with accuracy and fluency about familiar topics.

Online Class: This second-semester Italian course is interactive and conducted completely online. The students do not need to be on campus in order to participate. It requires students to work independently and follow a very structured syllabus. The class meets with the instructor online once a week; meeting hours are flexible. The students are involved in a variety of online tasks such as reading, listening, completing exercises, posting writing assignments and recording responses. All the activities are integrated into a larger cultural context. The grammar focuses on past and future tense, allowing the students to speak and write in simple sentences about familiar topics with accuracy and fluency.

See textbook info here.(click on the "textbooks" tab on the top right)

FRIT M200: Intermediate Italian I (3 cr.)

Monday, Wednesday, Friday


Number Days Time Room Instructor Notes
11211 MWF 11:15-12:05 LH 023 Pantalea Mazzitello
**2259 MWF 12:20-1:10 SY 004 Staff **This section has been canceled!
2260 MWF 1:25-2:15 LH 23 Pantalea Mazzitello

Online Class

Number Instructor Notes
2257 Francesco Samarini Online meetings Tuesdays
either 9:30-10:45 am OR 6:15-7:30pm

Note: Contact the Director of Italian Language Instruction, Dr. Karolina Serafin for permission to enroll in the above online course section.

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: M110, M115, M150, or equivalent.

This course is a continuation of Elementary Italian II. In class the students concentrate on reviewing and refining structures learned at the 100-level, but this time at an intermediate level. During the semester students are involved in a variety of tasks practicing speaking, writing, listening and reading in cultural context. The course features study of original Italian short movies that offer the first stimulus for learning intermediate-level vocabulary, grammar and culture. Credit given for only one of M200 or M215.

Online Class: This Intermediate I Italian course is interactive and conducted completely online. The students do not need to be on campus in order to participate. It requires students to work independently and follow a very structured syllabus. The class meets with the instructor online once a week; meeting hours are flexible. The students are involved in a variety of online tasks at the intermediate level, such as reading, listening, completing exercises, posting writing assignments and recording responses. All the activities are integrated into a larger cultural context. The grammar reviews all the material learned in previous courses in an intermediate context and increases skills by adding more intermediate structures and vocabulary.

See textbook info here.(click on the "textbooks" tab on the top right)

FRIT M215: Accelerated Second-Year Italian (4 cr.)

Number Days Time Room Instructor
6186 MTWR 1:25-2:15 JH A105 Karolina Serafin

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: M115 or equivalent (M100 and M150)

This intensive intermediate-level Italian course covers the material of two semesters in one (M200 & M250). The course builds upon the first three semesters of beginning Italian (or equivalent) adding the unique feature of short films as the first stimulus for learning intermediate-level vocabulary, grammar, and cultural concepts. The various activities aim to strengthen proficiency in listening, speaking, reading and writing, and students will gain the ability to understand, evaluate, compare, and appreciate many aspects of Italian culture. The course is fast-paced and very rewarding. It is recommended for students with previous experience learning foreign languages (specifically Romance languages). Credit given for only one of the following: M215 or M200-M250.

See textbook info here.(click on the "textbooks" tab on the top right)

FRIT M222: Topics in Italian Culture
Crossing Animal Borders

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
14368MWF4:40-5:30BH 322Giorgio Losi

This class provides IUB GenEd A&H, COLL (CASE) A&H Breadth of Inquiry, COLL (CASE) Global Civ & Culture, and GenEd World Cultures credits

(This course is offered in English)

Animal Issues in the Italian and International Debate
Every year over 50 billion animals are killed in the production of food, clothing and other commodities, for experimentation, entertainment, in the pet trade, or just through the destruction of their environment. How do animals resist these forms of oppression? How do we exhibit solidarity with them? How is the exploitation of non-human animals related to gender, race and class inequalities? In this course, students will gain a panoramic view about the international debate on animal issues. Adopting the perspective developed by Italian scholars and activists in the last ten years, we will combine Italian literature, theory (Agamben, Negri, Esposito) and movies (from documentaries to sci-fi).

FRIT M236: Dante's Divine Comedy (3 cr.)

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
34529TR4:00-5:15WH 106Akash Kumar

This class provides COLL (CASE) A&H Breadth of Inquiry, GenEd A&H, and GenEd World Culture credits

2015 marked the 750th anniversary of Dante’s birth, and his Comedy remains very much present in modern culture, whether it be a Dan Brown novel and its film adaptation of 2016, Don Draper reading Inferno on a beach in Mad Men, or a hack-and-slash video game by Electronic Arts. But it is by no means universally accepted: in 2012, a UN-sanctioned charity organization (Gherush92) proclaimed that Dante’s Divine Comedy is a homophobic, racist text and should not be taught in any classroom. Our reading of the poem will focus on these issues, among other matters of social justice, and explore what it means to read a 700-year-old text in the present day. We will ask difficult questions of ourselves and of the poem, exploring its radical nature both in its own historical moment and in the continued controversies surrounding various aspects of the Dantean afterlife. Should we read it? Does it still matter? We will immerse ourselves in the moral universe that Dante creates within the text, delving into the details and idiosyncrasies of his Hell, Purgatory, and Paradise, and form our own assessment of the poem’s continued value and influence.

FRIT M250: Intermediate Italian II (3 cr.)

Number Days Time Room Instructor Notes
**13121 MWF 11:15-12:05 JH 440 **This section has been canceled!
**4231 MWF 1:25-2:15 AC C118 **This section has been canceled!
39161 MW 7:15-8:30PM LH 023 Sara Dallavalle **NEW SECTION ADDED

Online Class

Number Instructor Notes
*10544 Lorenzo Bonaiti Online meetings Wednesdays
either 9:30-10:45am or 6:15-7:30pm

*Contact the Director of Italian Language Instruction, Dr. Karolina Serafin for permission to enroll in the above online class.

Fulfills GenEd World Languages requirement

Prerequisite: M200 or equivalent.

This second-year Italian course meets three times a week and builds upon the first three semesters of beginning and intermediate Italian (or equivalent). In M250, students concentrate on learning how to express their ideas and debate the pros and cons of certain situations as well as to offer advice and express opinions on a variety of familiar subjects, all in the Italian language. The students are involved in a variety of tasks practicing speaking, writing, listening and reading in a cultural context. The course includes study of original Italian short movies that offer the first stimulus for learning intermediate-level vocabulary, grammar and culture.

Online Class: This Intermediate II Italian course is interactive and conducted completely online. The students do not need to be on campus in order to participate. It requires students to work independently and follow a very structured syllabus. The class meets with the instructor online once a week; meeting hours are flexible. The students are involved in a variety of online tasks at the intermediate level, such as reading, listening, completing exercises, posting writing assignments and recording responses. All the activities are integrated into a larger cultural context. The grammar focuses on intermediate level structures, such as subjunctives.

See textbook info here.(click on the "textbooks" tab on the top right)

FRIT M300: Italian Conversation & Diction (4 cr.)

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
4232MTWRF10:10-11:00AC C116 Sara Dallavalle
&
Carlotta Vacchelli

Prerequisite: M250, M215, or consent of instructor.

Conducted in Italian, this course continues the study of advanced structures through a variety of media and authentic texts. While the focus is on accuracy and fluency in speaking, practice with other skills and the study of Italian culture will be integrated throughout.

FRIT M307: Masterpieces of Italian Literature I (3 cr.)
Mediterranean Crossings

Number Days Time Room Instructor
13122 TR 1:00-2:15 FQ 012B Akash Kumar

This class provides COLL (CASE) A&H Breadth of Inquiry, COLL (CASE) Global Civ & Culture credits

Prerequisite: M300 or M301 or consent of instructor.

This course will explore the rich literary tradition of Italy, from the late Middle Ages to the 18th century. While we will delve into the formation of the canon of Italian literature, from the dominant Tuscan voices of Dante, Boccaccio, and Petrarch to the Renaissance humanists, Baroque poets, and Enlightenment-era thinkers, we will also cultivate an appreciation for other voices that subvert and complicate a linear view of Italian literature, from raucous medieval poetry to the 18th century comedy of Carlo Goldoni. We will also explore how the wider Mediterranean world is reflected upon and engaged with by Italian authors throughout the early history of Italian literature, whether in acknowledged cross-cultural influences, representations of the cultural other, or a look to the world beyond Italian borders.

FRIT M455: Seminar in Italian Cinema (3 cr.)
Forgotten Films and Lesser Known Films and Documentaries
Antonio Vitti

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
13123TR2:30-3:45BH 221Antonio Vitti

This class provides COLL (CASE) A&H Breadth of Inquiry credit

In this course students approach film, first and foremost, as an art. We will take into account social, cultural, and historical contexts; but films themselves are the focus of study and discussion. Students will learn how to seek artistic values in lesser known films and documentaries, with emphasis on understanding the intentions of filmmakers and appreciating their creativity. We will study how to see these films. The final goal is to explore and appreciate the creativity of lesser known filmmakers and/or less frequently studied films of famous directors such as Sergio Citti, Alberto Lattuada, Giuseppe Gaudino, Carlo Lizzani, Giuseppe De Santis, Tonino Valerii, Damiani, Pietro Germi, Calopresti, Chiesa and Giuseppe Bertolucci, Mario Bava, Salce, Maresco, Ando’, Mingozzi and Torre. At the end of the semester students will learn that Italian cinema is not based on a few grand masters and selected periods.

This course is conducted in Italian

FRIT X493: Individual Readings in Italian Literature (1-3 cr.)

Number Day/Time Instructor
2261 Arranged Massimo Scalabrini

Independent study on a specific topic not taught in one of this semester's regular courses. If interested, complete the permission form.

FRIT M499: Reading for Honors (3 cr.)

Number Day/Time Instructor
2262 Arranged Massimo Scalabrini

For students preparing an honors project to receive a degree with departmental honors in Italian.

Interdisciplinary Courses

COLL-C 103: Critical Approaches: Arts & Humanities(3 cr.)
Cloak and Dagger
Marco Arnaudo

Number Days Time Room Instructor
7594 MW 9:05-9:55 SW 007 Marco Arnaudo
7595 F 11:15-12:05 GA 1122 Francesco Samarini
7596 F 1:25-2:15 AC C102 Francesco Samarini
7597 F 11:15-12:05 GA 1112 Carlotta Vacchelli
7598 F 1:25-2:15 PY 115 Carlotta Vacchelli

Fulfills IUB GenEd A&H and COLL (CASE) A&H Breadth of Inquiry credits

This course introduces students to one of the most basic concepts of literary criticism - literary genres - with specific reference to a popular genre such as the so-called "thriller." "Thriller" is a term that came into use in the late nineteenth century and was applied not only to the detective story, the most famous examples of which were A. Conan Doyle's tales about Sherlock Holmes, but also to a closely related literary genre, the spy novel, that also attained great popularity during the period.

The primary focus of this course will be to teach students how to understand the conventions and traditions that govern any literary genre, with specific reference to the "thriller" as exemplified by selected detective and spy stories in both literature and film. Attention will be paid to critical concepts such as style, form, structure, point of view, and implied reader, in order to provide students with analytical tools that will be valuable in the years to come. It is my hope that students will apply the lessons they learn about genre in this class to any literary genre, not only genres typical of popular culture.

Readings will include the detective fiction of Poe, Conan Doyle, Agatha Christie, Raymond Chandler, and Friedrich Dürrenmatt. We will also examine several detective-mystery movies, including the recent Sherlock Holmes (2009), and the classic masterpieces of the noir tradition, including The Maltese Falcon and The Big Sleep. For the spy genre, we will read the pre-Cold War novel A Coffin for Dimitrios, a James Bond novel by Ian Fleming, and a Cold War spy novel by John Le Carré. In addition, we will screen two very different James Bond films: one made during the height of the Cold War, and Martin Campbell's Casino Royale (2006).

HON H 233: Great Authors, Composers & artists (3 cr.)
The Pen & the Paintbrush
Nicolas Valazza

Number Days Time Room Instructor
11523 TR 1:00-2:15 WH 203 Nicolas Valazza

Fulfills GenEd A&H credit and COLL (CASE) A&H Breadth of Inquiry credit

The purpose of this course is to explore the relationship between painting and literature from an interdisciplinary perspective (literary, art historical and philosophical), while developing a critical approach that questions the connections and discrepancies between text and image throughout history. Literature and painting have often been considered “sister arts,” even though their relationship has been characterized by rivalry as much as solidarity. Since Plato and the exclusion of “artists” from his Republic, painters and writers have struggled to assert their respective arts among the liberal ones. But while poetry was integrated earlier into humanist education, thanks to its discursive and “intellectual” nature, painting had to wait until the Italian Renaissance to get rid of its connotation as a mere mechanical art, and thus acquire its liberal status. Furthermore, only by comparing itself to the “intellectual” dignity of poetry, did painting succeed in surpassing its former status. Since the Renaissance, painters and poets have, on the one hand, fraternized with each other to promote the complementarity of both arts while, on the other hand, struggling to assert the superiority of their own art.

In this course, we will read and analyze several key texts that retrace the ambivalent relationship between painting and literature from antiquity to modern times. Beginning with the section of Plato’s Republic condemning the arts of imitation, as well as the section of Aristotle’s Poetics that conversely praises them, we will then examine Pliny’s and Ovid’s legendary tales about painters, which define many characteristics of the figure of the artist as s/he is still conceived nowadays. We will next devote our class meetings to the emergence of art theory in the Italian Renaissance, by reading excerpts from writings by artists (Alberti, Leonardo da Vinci, Vasari) who claimed the intellectual status of painting (what Leonardo calls “cosamentale”: “a thing of the mind”). It will be interesting to see how this “liberalization” of painting was achieved by way of comparing it to poetry and other liberal arts, including geometry and astronomy. In order to become familiar with critical concepts of modern aesthetics (such as the “sublime” and the “relativity of beauty”), we will then read selected texts by 18th-century philosophers, artists and art critics (Kant, Burke, Hume, Diderot, Richardson, Hogarth, Reynolds, etc.). Lastly, we will explore the figure of the painter as a fictional character, as he appears in several short stories and novels: Balzac’s The Unknown Masterpiece, Gautier’s The Golden Fleece, Huysmans’ Against the Grain and Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray; as well as in film adaptations of these narratives. When possible, as a base for the critical reflection on the comparison between text and image, readings will be supported by visual examples taken from painters mentioned or implied in the literature.

Students will be required to write a response paper on the readings every two weeks, to make an oral presentation in class, to write a mid-term composition, and to develop a personal research project, leading to a final paper.

HON-H 236: Conflict Simulation (3 cr.)
Understanding Conflict in War, Management and Business
Marco Arnaudo

Number Days Time Room Instructor
33317 MW 11:15-12:30 HU 111 Marco Arnaudo

Fulfills GenEd S&H credit and COLL (CASE) S&H Breadth of Inquiry credit

This class explores the concept of conflict and the tools that have been devised over the centuries to prevent it, manage it, or channel it toward productive uses. The course includes essays about the history and theory of conflict (especially in regard to war), coupled with in-class activities that will present the students with different types of conflict simulations. These activities span from role-playing games and storytelling games, to various examples of tabletop wargames, cooperative games, semi-cooperative games, and diplomatic games. We will be talking about theory of warfare throughout history, taking into account the role of diplomacy and war theory. We will then explore cases in which conflict theory that originated in the military has been applied in recent decades to management and business - from the now common use of Sun Tzu's Art of War as a business training manual, to works about civilian management grounded in military thinking. These works in particular contradict the stereotype that military command is simply barking orders, and will demonstrate how it is rather about building cooperation, trust, and common goals. We will then discuss practical ways to apply these ideas to modern management and business.

HON-H 238: Politics & Communication (3 cr.)
War and Cinema
Andrea Ciccarelli

Number Days Time Room Instructor
14115 TR 2:30-3:45 HU 111 Andrea Ciccarelli

Fulfills GenEd S&H credit and COLL (CASE) S&H Breadth of Inquiry credit

In this class we will analyze how diverse political and cultural traditions may affect the way cinema views, interprets and portrays war, its causes and its effects. We will analyze 2-3 films which focus on the same war/event, and discuss affinities and discrepancies in regards to their artistic approach, as well as their political, historical, and anthropological meaning. Amongst others, we will watch films by Oscar winners directors Steven Spielberg, Kathryn Bigelow, Clint Eastwood, and Francis Ford Coppola.

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