Graduate Courses in French and Italian

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Fall 2015

French Courses

FRIT F491: Elementary French for Graduate Students (3 cr.)

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
4073TR7:15-8:45 pmBH 105B. Devan Steiner

The course provides an introduction to structures of the language necessary for reading, followed by reading in graded texts of a general nature. Credit given for only one of F491 or any French course at the 100-level.

FRIT F514: French Renaissance Poetry (3 cr.)

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
30438W3:35-5:30SE 009Eric MacPhail

This graduate survey of 16th-century lyric poetry will be divided into three sections, preceded by a preliminary review of prosody and of some salient features of Middle French literary usage and linguistic consciousness. The first section will be devoted to forms and genres inherited and invented by the Renaissance, and a survey of poetic schools and their manifestos. The second section will focus on the love poetry of Maurice Scève and Pierre de Ronsard. The third section will examine the poetry of the wars of religion, excluding the Tragiques which we read last semester. Students will do an in-class exposé and write a 15 to 20 page term paper on a subject chosen in consultation with the professor.

FRIT F540: Poie et Poique XIXe Sile (3 cr.)

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
33565R4:00-6:00SY 105Nicolas Valazza

The French Revolution of 1848 and the subsequent proclamation of the Second Empire in 1852 coincided, on the literary level, with the decay or exile of the so-called mages romantiques (Lamartine, Vigny and Hugo). At the same time, poets saw their cultural prestige diminish in comparison with the growing success of popular novelists. Even worse, beginning with the trial of Baudelaire’s Fleurs du Mal in 1857, poetry entered a kind of “age of suspicion”: Poets were accused of infringing morals by concealing their intrinsic immorality under the obscurity of their verses. Yet many poets tried to make the most of this outcast condition by explicitly claiming the status of “cursed poets,” as evidenced by Verlaine’s critical anthology Les Poètes maudits (1884), dedicated to Corbière, Rimbaud and Mallarmé. The poet’s “curse”, whereby the latter defies the norms of bourgeois society and literature, thus became one of the main factors in the renewal of post-Romantic French poetry, from the emergence of prose poetry to the invention of free verse. In this course, we shall study selected works by several “cursed poets” (we may add to the above-mentioned names those of Desbordes-Valmore, Lautréamont, Cros, Laforgue, etc.), focusing particularly on the metamorphosis of the lyrical subject and the formal innovations that characterized the evolution of French poetry in the second half of the nineteenth century. Readings and class discussion will be in French.

FRIT F572: College French Teaching Practicum (1 cr.)

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
4076F11:15-12:05GA 1122Kelly Sax

Graded on a pass/fail basis.

Focused classroom observations followed by discussions; identification and evaluation of teaching techniques. Required of new associate instructors of French.

FRIT F576: Introduction to French Phonology (3 cr.)

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
30446TR2:30-3:45SE 009Julie Auger

This course deals with what it means to have knowledge of French phonology and how such knowledge is mentally represented. We focus on central issues in the phonology of French: nasal vowels, schwa, vowel alternations, final consonants, syllable structure constraints, and prosodic structure. There are two underlying themes: general conceptual advances in the understanding of phonological representations and the debate concerning the nature of phonological processes.

FRIT F580: Applied French Linguistics (3 cr.)

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
30455TR9:30-10:45CAHIKevin Rottet

Applied Linguistics is the field of study which seeks to apply findings from core areas of linguistics to real-world problems and concerns. Our focus will be the application of selected topics in linguistics to the pedagogy of French as a foreign language in the United States. Inter alia, we will draw on a sociolinguistically-oriented survey of the linguistic situation in various Francophone regions, enabling us to explore aspects of variability in French, including social, stylistic, and geographical variation, and implications of such variability for the FLE classroom. Our examination of French as found in multiple settings will lead us into an exploration of questions about what it means to be a native speaker, and how and why the construct has been problematized in the applied linguistic literature; the contentious literature on learning a second language in an immersion program, and why scholars have taken such polarized views on the success of its outcomes; issues of language policy in France and the Francophone world; and questions about language norms and pedagogical norms.

FRIT F652: Seminaire sur l’intermedialité (3 cr.)
Médiatisations de l'oralité : écriture, enregistrement audiovisuel, remédiations numériques

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
33566T3:35-6:00AC C107Vincent Bouchard

La parole, les gestes, l’apparence, la présence et la performance, sont généralement considérés comme la première forme de médiation (Mauss, 1936 ; McLuhan, 1964). Ainsi, c'est à travers différentes techniques du corps (Mauss, 1936) que l’Homme appréhende son monde, autant sur le plan de l’expérience que de la mémoire. Ce séminaire est organisé autour de la question de l'oralité, de sa forme directe (en présence) à sa forme médiatisée (écriture ou enregistrement). Nous envisagerons divers aspects de cette question, de l’oralité « active » lors d’une performance, en passant par la médiatisation de l’oralité (écriture, cinéma, radio, vidéo, télévision, numérique, etc.), jusqu’à différentes formes de mise en scène de l’oralité dans une oeuvre.

FRIT F680: Bilingualism & Language Contact in Francophonie (3 cr.)

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
30473TR1:00-2:015GA 0009Kevin Rottet

This course will focus on the linguistic and social phenomena surrounding language contact. We will examine the typology of contact situations and a broad range of outcomes including language maintenance, shift and death; diglossia; koineization; pidginization and creolization; language intertwining or the creation of mixed languages such as Michif, Ma’a, and Media Lengua; Sprachbunds and language areas; codeswitching, lexical borrowing, and grammatical borrowing including calquing and replication. We will also examine some of the basic findings on bilingualism: definitions, typologies of bilingualism, issues of bilingualism and the human brain, and issues of bilingual or multilingual speech communities. Much of the material examined in this course will be drawn from situations where French is one of the languages in contact, whether in North America, Africa, Europe or the South Pacific, and students will have opportunities in course assignments and a term paper to explore these varieties in greater detail. The course is cross-listed with L625.

FRIT F815: Individual Reading in French Literature and Linguistics (3 cr.)

NumberDay/Time
4077Arranged

Independent study of a topic not offered in a regular course this semester, under the guidance of a faculty member. Requires departmental authorization. Consult with the professor you would like to work with, and then obtain a permission form from the department office.

FRIT F875: Research in French Literature and Language (3 cr.)

NumberDay/TimeNotes
4078ArrangedOn-campus
7971ArrangedOff-campus*

*Obtain online permission from the Graduate Secretary.

FRIT G901: Advanced Research in French (6 cr.)

NumberDays/Time
4079Arranged

Obtain online permission from the Director of Graduate Studies.

Italian Courses

FRIT M500: Seminar in Italian Cinema (3 cr.)
Pasolini's Creativity and Legacy

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
30534R4:00-6:00SY 210Antonio Vitti

In this course special attention will be given to Pier Paolo Pasolini's works in the early stage of his creativity in the fifties and sixties. We will study: La meglio gioventu', Le Ceneri di Gramsci, his Roman novels: Ragazzi di vita and Una vita violenta, and his Roman short stories. We will also focus on his early films: Accattone, Mamma Roma, La rabbia, La ricotta, Comizi d'amore, Il Vangelo secondo Matteo, Uccelli e uccellini, Che cosa sono le nuvole? His role as actor in Lizzani's film Il gobbo, his collaboration as scriptwriter with Fellini and Bolognini will also be analyzed. His legacy will be investigated by studying "Appunti per un poema sul terzo mondo," and Franco Cassano's Il pensiero meridiano, *Three memorable documentaries and a film made on Pasolini will also be screened to better understand one of the most significant, original and controversial Italian intellectuals.

FRIT M503: Medieval Italian Literature and Culture (3-4 cr.)

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructorNotes
33556
33557
W4:00-6:00GA 0007H. Wayne Storey3 cr.
4 cr.

A close investigation of five Italian classics and their itinerary from manuscript to early print: Dante’s Commedia and Vita Nova, Boccaccio’s Decameron, Petrarch’s Rerum vulgarium fragmenta, and Tasso’s Gerusalemme liberata. This course will examine the ways that these five icon works were adopted for print from manuscript forms and how that process and the early editions affected interpretation of each work while establishing essential cultural information about the epoch and ethos that printed them. The printed editions that will be studied are owned either in the original or facsimile by the Lilly Library or the instructor (the 1472 Comedia printed in Foligno, the 1472 Valdezoco Fragmenta di Petrarca, the 1481 Dechamerone printed by Antonio da Strada and the Florentine 1527 (Venetian 1729) edition of the Decameron edited by Bernardo Segni et al., the 1576 Vita Nuova printed by Bartolomeo Sermartelli, and the Gierusalemme liberata printed by Febo Bonnà in July of 1581. Manuscripts will be consulted in facsimiles and digital editions. Readings will include secondary works on the PhD reading list: Michele Barbi’s Nuova filologia and Corrado Bologna’s Tradizione e fortuna dei classici italiani, and Gino Belloni et al, Commentario all’edizione in fac-simile dei ‘Rerum vulgarium fragmenta’.

FRIT M572: Italian Teaching Practicum (1 cr.)

NumberDaysTimeRoom
8976T1:00-2:15GA 3170

Graded on a pass/fail basis.

Focused classroom observations followed by discussions; identification and evaluation of teaching techniques. Required of new associate instructors; offered only in fall semester.

FRIT M604: Seminar in Renaissance Italian Literature (3 cr.)
Literature & Culture—Italian Baroque

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
33563T9:05-11:00GA 0009Marco Arnaudo

Questo corso indaga i concetti e i testi basilari del Barocco letterario in Italia. Gli autori esaminati includono Marino, Galileo, Bartoli, Arcangela Tarabotti, e molti altri dai piu' diversi ambiti della produzione culturale del periodo. In italiano.

FRIT M815: Individual Reading in Italian Literature (3 cr.)

NumberDay/Time
4103Arranged

Independent study of a topic not offered in a regular course this semester, under the guidance of a faculty member. Requires departmental authorization. Consult with the professor you would like to work with, and then obtain permission form from the department office.

FRIT M875: Research in Italian Literature

NumberDay/TimeNotes
4104ArrangedOn-campus
7972ArrangedOff-campus*

*Obtain online permission from the Graduate Secretary.

FRIT G901: Advanced Research in Italian (6 cr.)

NumberDay/Time
4080Arranged

Obtain online permission from the Director of Graduate Studies.



Spring 2016

French Courses

FRIT F492: Reading French for Graduate Students(3 cr.)

NumberDaysTimeRoom
4876TR7:15-8:45 pmGA 3
4877TR7:15-8:45 pmGA 3

Prerequisite: F491 or consent of department.

Open with consent of the instructor to undergraduates who have already completed the B.A. language requirement in another language. Continuation of language and reading development from F491. Credit given for only one of F492 or any of the following: F150, F169, F200, F205, or F219.

FRIT F573: Methods of College French Teaching (3 cr.)
Kelly Sax

NumberDaysTimeRoom
14939M3:35-5:30pmSY 0009

FRIT F582: Introduction to French Semantics (3 cr.)
Laurent Dekydtspotter

NumberDaysTimeRoom
30482TR1:00-2:15GA 0009

F582 introduces students to issues in the interpretation of French. The course focuses on major interpretive phenomena in French and on the nature of semantic representations as revealed by these phenomena. The goal is to show how fairly simple assumptions made precise by the tools of logical inquiry can reveal deep insights into knowledge of French and related issues of language acquisition. A pervading theme is the question of learnability of semantics knowledge. We discuss the nature of grammar and mental organization as revealed by semantic evidence.

FRIT F630: Studies in 17th-Century French Literature: “Expressions of Absolutism”(3 cr.)
Hall Bjornstad

NumberDaysTimeRoom
30483R4:00-6:00WH 205

Although everyone recognizes the reign of Louis XIV as the peak of French absolutism, it is important to remember that the term "absolutism" itself was never used in the period. As an analytic tool, the term is useful less on account of its indexical value – pointing to a stable definition or sparking discussion on what that definition should be – than because it brings into focus the practices of self-representation that found and sustain the power of the king. Indeed, the only place where absolutism incontestably exists is in its manifestations, in the image of itself that royal power projects outwards but also inwards. This course will study this dynamic by looking closely at various artistic expressions of absolutism (theater, poetry, architecture, portraiture, etc.) that respond to and help construct the image of Louis XIV. In doing so, we hope to take up the challenge formulated by prominent French historians Fanny Cosandey and Robert Descimon when they concluded a recent book-length survey of the immensely rich and varied research on French absolutism with the following surprising statement: "We end up, then [after 200 pages of reviewing recent scholarship], with the contradiction of an absolutism that we know incomparably well in its details but without a good grasp of its totality or coherence." The collective and interdisciplinary endeavor of the course, where each participant will specialize in a specific expression, is organized in the firm conviction that if not the totality, then certainly the coherence of French absolutism under Louis XIV best can be grasped through a careful examination of the various aspects of its expressions. Readings will include primary texts by Molière, Racine, Boileau, La Fontaine, Félibien, and Louis XIV himself, as well as critical essays by Louis Marin, Peter Burke, Roger Chartier, and Norbert Elias, among others. Weekly response papers and scaffolded final research project. All readings in French (English translations available). Seminar conducted in English.

FRIT F650: Etudes de litterature contemporaine (3 cr.)
French Avant-Gardes
Margaret Gray

NumberDaysTimeRoom
30481W3:35-5:30PY 113

In his 1917 lecture at the Théâtre du Vieux Colombier in Paris, poet Guillaume Apollinaire proclaims that « l’esprit nouveau, qui gonfle de vie l'univers, se manifestera formidablement dans les lettres, dans les arts et dans toutes les choses que l'on connaisse. » We will test such a claim by scrutinizing the various avant-gardes of Apollinaire’s time and beyond. The Montmartre neighborhood of Paris becomes the site of Apollinaire’s artistic involvement with cubist painters, even as Paris attracts émigrés such as Chagall and Diaghilev with his Ballets Russes from Russia, and Miró joins Spanish compatriot Picasso. With the Manifestes du Surréalisme (1924 and 1930), Breton formalizes the Surrealist project, joined by Eluard and Aragon: a project whose impact upon later twentieth-century poets will prove decisive. In his “ballet satirique” Les mariés de la Tour Eiffel (1921) —set to music by the Groupe des Six (Auric, Durey, Honegger, Milhaud, Poulenc and Tailleferre)—Cocteau sets out to correct “ce que le théâtre est devenu: un vieil album de photographies.” Such “correction” is also undertaken by Jarry’s Ubu roi (1896), which itself anticipates certain developments in the théâtre de l’absurde of Beckett and Ionesco. Proust’s manuscript--refused by three editors before a fourth agreed (while finding it “illisible”) to publish it at author’s expense—anticipates much of the nouveau roman’s innovations, as we will see in Sarraute’s manifesto L’Ere du soupçon. In other developments, however, the novel renews its meditation on the socio-political as Georges Bataille troubled novel Le bleu du ciel anticipates the far right’s rise in the Europe of the thirties in Le bleu du ciel (written in 1935, published in 1957, and dedicated to Surrealist painter André Masson). Through such a trans-disciplinary, trans-genre approach that will take us to the IU Art Museum and perhaps a recital or two of relevant musical works, we will demonstrate the prescience of Apollinaire’s claim in 1917. Final grades will be based on class involvement, a 20-minute presentation on the model of a conference paper, and a 20 pp. final paper on the model of a journal article. The language of the course will be French, but students from other departments will be invited to participate in English.

FRIT F672: French Dialectology (3 cr)
Julie Auger

NumberDaysTimeRoom
30484TR9:30-10:45PV 270 (SPEA)

Ce cours s’intéresse à la variation géographique et sociale en français. Après un bref rappel de l’histoire de cette langue et une description de la situation linguistique en France contemporaine, le cours sera divisé en deux grandes parties: dialectologie et sociolinguistique. On y discute les méthodes de la dialectologie traditionnelle et l’élaboration des atlas linguistiques, on compare ces méthodes avec celles de la dialectologie moderne et on y présente les principaux dialectes d’oïl. Nous traversons ensuite l’Atlantique pour voir comment le français hexagonal et les dialectes d’oïl se sont à la fois conservés et transformés. Finalement, nous verrons comment le besoin d’étudier la variation en milieu urbain a donné naissance à la sociolinguistique. Les questions de norme, de variation sociale, de types de français y sont abordées et exemplifiées à l’aide d’études variationnistes sur des phénomènes linguistiques précis.

FRIT F810: Individual Readings in French and Francophone Civilization (1-6 cr.)
Massimo Scalabrini

NumberDay/Time
8227Arranged

Independent study of a topic in French or Francophone culture/civilization not offered in a regular course this semester, under the guidance of a faculty member. Requires departmental authorization. Consult with the professor you would like to work with, and then obtain permission form from the department office.

FRIT F815: Individual Readings in French Literature and Linguistics (1-6 cr.)
Massimo Scalabrini

NumberDay/Time
4880Arranged

Independent study of a topic not offered in a regular course this semester, under the guidance of a faculty member. Requires departmental authorization. Consult with the professor you would like to work with, and then obtain a permission form from the department office.

FRIT F825: Seminar in French Literature (3 cr.)
Alison Calhoun

NumberDaysTimeRoom
30485T4:15-6:15WH 205

This interdisciplinary graduate seminar will tackle the thorny topic of how to talk and write about the relationship between music and literature, with a concentration on the early modern period. Each week, we will read a work of French literature that is related to vocal music, either because it was set to music or because it represents an author’s theoretical or satirical reflections on vocal music. Authors/composers will include: Guillaume de Machaut, Pierre Ronsard, Philippe Quinault, Jean-Baptiste Lully, Molière, René Descartes, Philippe Rameau, Elisabeth Jacquet de La Guerre, Voltaire, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Denis Diderot, Paul Verlaine, and Claude Debussy. Our first aim will be to analyze these works of literature through close readings supported by literary history. Alongside this analysis, we will study a different methodological, critical, or practical approach to the musical component of our reading drawing from music history, digital humanities, trends in musicology, sound theory, cultural studies, and performance (recital). Final grades will be based on one in-class exposé and one term paper. This seminar is open to all graduate students with good reading knowledge of French.

FRIT F875: Research in French Literature and Language (1-12 cr.)
Massimo Scalabrini

NumberDay/TimeNotes
4881ArrangedOn-campus
8230ArrangedOff-campus

Obtain online permission from the Graduate Student Services Coordinator.

FRIT G901: Advanced Research (French) (6 cr.)
Massimo Scalabrini

NumberDay/Time
4882Arranged

Obtain online permission from the Director of Graduate Studies.

Italian Courses

FRIT M504: Renaissance Italian Literature and Culture (3-4 cr.)
Forms of Civility in the Italian Renaissance
Massimo Scalabrini

NumberDaysTimeRoomNotes
14981
14986
M4:00-6:00SE 0093 cr.
4 cr.

In such seminal texts as Pontano’s De sermone (1509), Castiglione’s Cortegiano (1528), Della Casa’s Galateo (1558) and Guazzo’s Civil conversazione (1574) the Italian Renaissance created a new style of moral conduct: the style of civility. This graduate course examines the classical genealogy, the social and historical milieu and the rhetorical matrix of this new form of social interaction, which was to become the generative model of early modern European ethics, and which was governed by the values of moderation, convenience, conformity, adaptability, grace, and dissimulation. The course will be conducted in Italian.

FRIT M573: Methods in Italian Language Teaching (3 cr.)
Colleen Ryan

NumberDay/TimeRoom
30550TR 11:15-12:30pm HU 217

In this course we will explore foreign language teaching and learning from a variety of theoretical and practical perspectives that inform our daily decisions about effective methodologies for fostering second language acquisition. Students will read and discuss a variety of materials pertaining to all L2 skill areas and cultural proficiency. Additional components of this course include teaching for creative and critical thinking, multiple intelligences theory, second language acquisition research methods, an introduction to teaching literature, expertise in teaching, performative aspects of teaching and learning, ongoing professional development and the creation of a formal teaching dossier. Assignments range from short critical commentaries, discussion questions, annotated bibliographies, and collaborative presentations, to an oral exam and final teaching dossier materials.

FRIT M605: Seminar in Modern Italian Literature (3-4 cr.)
1968: Politics, Society and Artistic Movements in Italy after the “Spring" Revolution
Andrea Ciccarelli

NumberDaysTimeRoomNotes
30551
30552
W4:00-6:00BH 3213 cr.
4 cr.

In questo corso analizzeremo alcuni dei principali cambiamenti e avvenimenti storici e culturali avvenuti in Italia dopo il ‘68. Ci soffermeremo in particolare su tre aspetti:

  • I mutamenti sociali, economici, culturali, di costume e il loro impatto sul mondo artistico —specie musicale e visivo— e sulla vita quotidiana.
  • Le stragi degli anni sessanta-settanta e la nascita e lo sviluppo del terrorismo e della “lotta armata” durante gli “anni di piombo” (1969-1988).
  • Le stragi di mafia e il radicamento della mafia nel corpo politico dello stato italiano .

FRIT M815: Individual Readings in Italian Literature (1-6 cr.)
Massimo Scalabrini

NumberDay/Time
4902Arranged

Independent study of a topic not offered in a regular course this semester, under the guidance of a faculty member. Requires departmental authorization. Consult with the professor you would like to work with, and then obtain permission form from the department office.

FRIT M875: Research in Italian Literature (1-12 cr.)
Massimo Scalabrini

NumberDay/TimeNotes
4903ArrangedOn-campus
8231ArrangedOff-campus

Obtain online permission from the Graduate Student Services Coordinator.

FRIT G901: Advanced Research (Italian) (6 cr.)
Massimo Scalabrini

NumberDay/Time
4883Arranged

Obtain online permission from the Director of Graduate Studies.



Summer 2016

First Six-Week Session
Tuesday, May 10–Friday, June 17

FRIT F491: Elementary French for Graduate Students (4 credits)

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
2607MTWRF11:00-12:15BH 305Kelly Kasper-Cushman

The course provides an introduction to structures of the language necessary for reading, followed by reading in graded texts of a general nature. Credit given for only one of F491 or any French course at the 100-level.

FRIT F815: Individual Readings in French Literature and Linguistics (1-6 cr.)

NumberDay/Time
2612Arranged

Independent study of a topic not offered in a regular course, under the guidance of a faculty member. Requires departmental authorization. Consult with the professor you would like to work with, and then complete the permission form and bring it to the office in GISB 3169.

FRIT F875: Research in French Literature and Language (1-12 cr.)

NumberDay/TimeNotes
2614ArrangedOn-campus
4213ArrangedOff-campus*

*Obtain online permission from the Graduate Services Coordinator.

FRIT M815: Individual Readings in Italian Literature (1-6 cr.)

NumberDay/Time
2618Arranged

Independent study of a topic not offered in a regular course, under the guidance of a faculty member. Requires departmental authorization. Consult with the professor you would like to work with, and then complete the permission form and bring it to the office in GISB 3169.

FRIT M875: Research in Italian Literature (1-12 cr.)

NumberDay/TimeNotes
2620ArrangedOn-campus
4215ArrangedOff-campus*

*Obtain online permission from the Graduate Services Coordinator.

Second Six-Week Session
Monday, June 20–Friday, July 29

FRIT F492: Reading French for Graduate Students (4 credits)

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
2609MTWRF11:00-12:15BH 319C. Scott Cawthon

Prerequisite: F491 or consent of department. Continuation of language and reading development from F491. Credit given for only one of F492 or any of the following: F150, F169, F200, F205, or F219.

FRIT F815: Individual Readings in French Literature and Linguistics (1-6 cr.)

NumberDay/Time
2613Arranged

Independent study of a topic not offered in a regular course, under the guidance of a faculty member. Requires departmental authorization. Consult with the professor you would like to work with, and then complete the permission form and bring it to the office in GISB 3169.

FRIT F875: Research in French Literature and Language (1-12 cr.)

NumberDay/TimeNotes
2615ArrangedOn-campus
4214ArrangedOff-campus*

*Obtain online permission from the Graduate Services Coordinator.

FRIT M815: Individual Readings in Italian Literature (1-6 cr.)

NumberDay/Time
2619Arranged

Independent study of a topic not offered in a regular course, under the guidance of a faculty member. Requires departmental authorization. Consult with the professor you would like to work with, and then complete the permission form and bring it to the office in GISB 3169.

FRIT M875: Research in Italian Literature (1-12 cr.)

NumberDay/TimeNotes
2621ArrangedOn-campus
4216ArrangedOff-campus*

*Obtain online permission from the Graduate Services Coordinator.



Fall 2016

French Courses

FRIT F491: Elementary French for Graduate Students (3 cr.)

NumberDaysTimeRoom
3870TR7:15-8:45 pmBH 233

The course provides an introduction to structures of the language necessary for reading, followed by reading in graded texts of a general nature. Credit given for only one of F491 or any French course at the 100-level.

FRIT F572: Practicum - College French Teaching (1 cr.)
Kelly Sax

NumberDaysTimeRoom
3873F10:00-10:50WH 114

Graded on a pass/fail basis.
Focused classroom observations followed by discussions; identification and evaluation of teaching techniques. Required of new associate instructors of French.

FRIT F577: Introduction to French Syntax (3 cr.)
Laurent Pierre Dekydtspotter

NumberDaysTimeRoom
30993TR1:00-2:15SE 009

F577 introduces students to issues in French syntax and to syntactic theory. The aim is to develop an understanding of syntactic categories, the principles governing syntactic representations and syntactic operations. Major syntactic differences between French and English will be examined and characterized in those syntactic principles

FRIT F603: History of the French Language I (3 cr.)
Barbara Vance

NumberDaysTimeRoom
30994TR2:30-3:45BH 016

F603 provides an introduction to the history of the French language, focusing on ‘internal’ developments while setting these against an ‘external’—historical and social—backdrop. We will investigate the evolution of the sound system (phonology), word formation (morphology), sentence structure (syntax), and vocabulary. In this first half of the 603-604 sequence, we especially cover early development (Popular Latin through 13th century Old French) and phonology/morphology. Diachronic study is complemented by readings from the Old French period.

FRIT F615: Studies in Medieval French Literature: Medieval Poetics of Desire(3 cr.)
Lucas Wood

NumberDaysTimeRoom
30996R10:00-12:00BH 221

This graduate-level introduction to medieval French literature focuses on the representation of desire as a central concern of vernacular poetics from the 12th through the 15th centuries. On the one hand, the development of conceptual and rhetorical vocabularies for writing variously directed desires—for God, for glory, for homosocial community, for the male or female beloved, for love (or sex) itself—helps to define the aesthetic specificity of major genres including the chanson de geste, hagiographic narrative, trouvère lyric, the lai, the chivalric romance, and the fabliaux. On the other hand, the ways in which medieval writers model subjectivity and orient the desires of their characters and their readers offer points of entry into their texts’ complex functioning as ideological vehicles that reflect, generate, critique, and transform social and political structures. With an eye to the inextricability of poetics from politics, therefore, we will devote special attention to the evolution of courtliness as a literary discourse and an aristocratic ideal. Turning first to the final quarter of the 12th century, we will scrutinize the supposedly complementary but profoundly fraught relationship between feudal chivalry and what has come to be known as “courtly love” (fine amors) in some of courtly culture’s founding myths. We will then explore courtly literature’s turn, in the wake of the paradigm-shifting 13th-century Roman de la Rose, from the heroic figure of the knight toward that of the virtuoso poet and masterful teacher of love (magister amoris). The resulting new genre, the dit amoureux, recenters courtly desire on the enjoyment of and the desire for poetry itself—but also, in conflating the art of love with the art of writing, invites an intensified critique of fine amors as a purely discursive construct, a beautiful but dangerously illusory mirage.

Key authors and texts will include the Chanson de Roland, Marie de France, Tristan, Chrétien de Troyes, Guillaume de Lorris, Richard de Fournival, Guillaume de Machaut, and Christine de Pizan. All primary texts will be assigned in the original Old French with facing-page modern French translations; reading knowledge of modern French is required, but no prior knowledge of Old French is assumed. Students will, however, be strongly encouraged to engage as closely as possible with the Old French texts, to which we will refer in class. Class discussion will take place in English.

FRIT F640: Studies in 19th-Century French Literature (3 cr.)
Literature & the Press in 19th Century France
Nicolas Valazza

NumberDaysTimeRoom
30998R4:00-6:00BH 011

This seminar will explore the close, and often conflictual, relationship between literature and the press in France throughout the 19th century, by examining the reciprocal influence these fields had upon one another. The emergence of modern newspapers in the 19th century is indeed inseparable from the transformation of the French literary field, characterized by the triumph of the popular novel and the decline of classical genres like tragedy and lyric poetry. The increase of literacy and the democratization of reading that accompanied the industrialization of the press thus provided the modern novel with a crowd of new readers craving for thrilling fictions. Conversely, serialized novels such as Dumas’ The Three Musketeers and Sue’s The Mysteries of Paris, published daily in newspapers as “feuilleton” before being bound in volumes, significantly increased the loyal consumers of the press, who bought the paper every day eager to discover how the plot of their favorite novel was unfolding. Moreover, many canonical literary authors such as Balzac, Dumas, Gautier, Zola and Vallès were also professional journalists. Seminar topics will include: the appearance of the serial novel (with Dumas and Sue), the industrialization of literature (with Balzac and Sainte-Beuve), the professionalization of journalism (with Goncourt and Vallès), the role of literary and art criticism (with Gautier), the rise of the public intellectual (with Zola), as well as the new relationship between literature, press and politics (with the Affaire Dreyfus). Readings and class discussion will be in French and in English.

FRIT F674: Advanced Practicum Teacher Training (1 cr)
Kelly Sax

NumberDays/Time
32734Arranged

Advanced graduate students develop teacher training skills by working with first-year Associate Instructors on lessons plans, activities, and evaluation methods for teaching French language. This course is particularly recommended for students interested in a career in teaching training and language program direction. Registration requires permission of instructor.

FRIT F679: French based Pidgins & Creoles (3 cr.)
Kevin Rottet

NumberDaysTimeRoom
31000TR9:30-10:45BH 140

Few areas of linguistics are as fraught with controversy as the study of the fascinating group of contact languages known as pidgins and creoles. Significant questions concern how these languages came about and in what kinds of historical settings, with different scholarly positions regarding the relative roles played by the colonial language(s), the substrate languages, and language universals in their development. Moving away from origins to the contemporary profiles of these languages, we will examine the question of whether a creole language can be identified as such synchronically, just by viewing its structure, or whether the category only exists from a socio-historical perspective. In addition to surveying the variety of ways these questions have been answered, we will examine some of the linguistic structures commonly associated with creole languages (e.g. TMA markers, aspect prominence, serial verbs, bimorphemic interrogatives, predicate clefting and ideophones, among others) and we will explore questions of where these features come from and where they might be going, for instance in settings where it is claimed that decreolization is underway. The course meets in conjunction with L636. Students enrolled in F679 will focus particularly on French-based pidgins and creoles, though data will also be drawn from English- and Portuguese based varieties, among others.

FRIT F815: Individual Readings in French Literature and Linguistics (1-6 cr.)
Massimo Scalabrini

NumberDay/Time
3874Arranged

Independent study of a topic not offered in a regular course this semester, under the guidance of a faculty member. Consult with the professor you would like to work with, and then fill out the permission form and return it to the office in GISB 3169.

FRIT F825: Seminar in French Literature (3 cr.)
Francophone Cinemas

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
31001T4:00-6:30BH 217Vincent Bouchard

Joint with CULS

Description: In this seminar we will explore various forms of Film aesthetics as they appear in the Francophone World since the 1930’s. We will specifically study the ‘cinéma d’auteur’ tradition [author theory], throughout the Francophone film production in Africa, North America, and Europe, addressing four of its main characteristics: the direct sound; the social focus; the political and post-colonial substratum; the ‘essai cinématographique’ [Essay Film].

Objectives: This course will encourage students to develop their historical, cultural and philosophical knowledge of the French-speaking world, their understanding of film aesthetics, as well as their academic research skills. In exploring a new theoretical framework, students will be lead to appropriate new concepts and to develop new avenues in their own research field.

Taught in English, with discussions in French and English

Textbooks: All texts and videos will be available on Canvas.

Evaluation & Grading: - Reading Response (10%).
- Oral presentation (20%, during the session).
- Research project (3 steps): Proposal (10%) – Oral paper (20%) – Final paper (40%).

Click here for full description

FRIT F875: Research in French Literature and Language (1-12 cr.)
Massimo Scalabrini

NumberDay/TimeNotes
3875ArrangedOn-campus
7431ArrangedOff-campus

Obtain online permission from the Graduate Student Services Coordinator.

FRIT G901: Advanced Research (French) (6 cr.)
Massimo Scalabrini

NumberDay/Time
3876Arranged

Obtain online permission from the Director of Graduate Studies.

Italian Courses

FRIT M572: Italian Teaching Practicum (1 cr.)
Karolina Serafin

NumberDayTimeRoom
8364T1:00-2:15pmTV 250

Graded on a pass/fail basis.

Focused classroom observations followed by discussions; identification and evaluation of teaching techniques. Required of new associate instructors; offered only in fall semester.

FRIT M600: Studies in Italian Film (3-4 cr.)
What is neorealism?
Antonio Carlo Vitti

NumberDaysTimeRoomNotes
31034R4:00-6:00BH 332

In this course through vast selections of films from various filmmakers and documentaries, critical essays, books, critics and historians, personal testimonies and interviews we will study Italian neorealism and its influence on international cinema. The course will also explore the historical period and the so called neorealism before neorealism, the influence of Soviet Cinema, Hollywood and European cinema. We will record and compare the many and often contradictory definitions of this style of filming prominent in Italy after World War II, characterized by so many concerns, perspectives, moral issues, ideologies, styles and beginning of modernity that cannot be reduced to social issues and on location shooting with untrained actors.

Film showings are on Thursday evenings from 7:15-10:00 pm, location to be announced. (The showings are optional but if students do not attend they are responsible for viewing the film independently.)

FRIT M815: Individual Readings in Italian Literature (1-6 cr.)
Massimo Scalabrini

NumberDay/Time
3895Arranged

Independent study of a topic not offered in a regular course this semester, under the guidance of a faculty member. Consult with the professor you would like to work with, and then fill out the permission form and return it to the office in GISB 3169.

FRIT M825: Seminar in Italian Literature & Culture (3 cr.)
Neo-Baroque Culture
Marco Arnaudo

NumberDayTimeRoomNotes
31039 T9:05-11:00SE 2453 cr.

Covers the concept of "Neo-Baroque" as defined by Calabrese, Ndalianis, and many other contemporary thinkers. Includes examples of Neo-Baroque culture from contemporary literature, film, tv shows, games, interactive fiction, and social media. Includes sociological, esthetic, and semiotic considerations.

FRIT M875: Research in Italian Literature (1-12 cr.)
Massimo Scalabrini

NumberDay/TimeNotes
3896ArrangedOn-campus
7432ArrangedOff-campus

Obtain online permission from the Graduate Student Services Coordinator.

FRIT G901: Advanced Research (Italian) (6 cr.)
Massimo Scalabrini

NumberDay/Time
3877Arranged

Obtain online permission from the Director of Graduate Studies.



Spring 2017

French Courses

FRIT F492: Reading French for Graduate Students(3 cr.)

NumberDaysTimeRoom
6042TR7:15-8:45 pm
(undergrad)
GA 0003
6043TR7:15-8:45 pm
(grad)
GA 0003

Prerequisite: F491 or consent of department.

Open with consent of the instructor to undergraduates who have already completed the B.A. language requirement in another language. Continuation of language and reading development from F491. Credit given for only one of F492 or any of the following: F150, F169, F200, F205, or F219.

FRIT F536: Le roman au XVIII Siècle (3 cr.)
Guillaume Ansart

NumberDaysTimeRoom
31025T4:00-6:00BH 138

Introduction à l’étude du roman français au XVIIIe siècle. L’accent sera mis sur les deux formes narratives qui ont dominé le siècle : le roman-mémoires et le roman épistolaire.

FRIT F573: Methods of College French Teaching (3 cr.)
Kelly Sax

NumberDaysTimeRoom
14695M3:35-5:30GA 3170

This course will provide an overview of approaches to foreign language teaching and the theoretical notions underlying current trends and classroom practice. Course objectives are the following:

  • To acquaint students with issues and research in foreign language teaching
  • To show ways of using research to achieve more effective classroom teaching and testing
  • To develop students' skills in evaluating teaching performance and instructional materials
  • To prepare students for continued professional development Class meetings will be devoted to discussion, short presentations and/or demonstrations by students and the instructor. Students will use professional journals to explore topics of interest; prepare classroom materials; evaluate instructional materials; and complete an online teaching portfolio

FRIT F579: Introduction to French Morphology (3 cr.)
Julie Auger

NumberDaysTimeRoom
31163TR2:30-3:45GA 2134

Ce cours constitue une introduction aux mécanismes de formation des mots du français. Nous examinerons la flexion, la dérivation et la composition des points de vue de la linguistique descriptive traditionnelle et de la grammaire générative.

FRIT F620: Studies in 16th Century French Literature (3 cr.)
The Erasmus Seminar
Joint listed with REN-R (class 12354)
Eric MacPhail

NumberDaysTimeRoom
31165W3:35-5:30GA 3170

This seminar will focus on Desiderius Erasmus, the foremost humanist of the Northern European Renaissance. We will survey the entire breadth of Erasmus’ work while concentrating, for anniversary reasons among others, on his contribution to Biblical scholarship, which includes the Novum Instrumentum of 1516, consisting of the Greek text, a new Latin translation, and annotations on the New Testamant, as well as the Paraphrases on the New Testament, and the controversy with Martin Luther over free will and the unity of the Church, which has preoccupied Erasmus scholarship in recent decades. We will also pay close and extended attention to the Adages, which reveal Erasmus’ achievement as a classical scholar and a moral philosopher as well as a source for much of Renaissance vernacular literature. We will make good use of the extensive original holdings of our Lilly Library, rich in Erasmiana, and we will benefit from the wisdom of two visiting Erasmian scholars, Reinier Leushuis of Florida State and Jean-François Cottier of Paris Diderot. For Spring 2017, Bloomington is the place to be for Erasmus studies.

Students will do an in-class presentation on a subject related to the readings and write a term paper on a subject chosen in consultation with the professor.

**FRIT F651: Studies in French Cinema (3 cr.)
Race and Ethnicity in Contemporary French Cinema
Brett Bowles

**This class has been canceled (F651 #31167)

NumberDaysTimeRoomNotes
31167R4:00-6:00SW 251CANCELED

Taking an interdisciplinary perspective from postcolonial studies and film studies, this course will examine the representation of race and ethnicity in French cinema since the 1990s as a contested field of cultural production and of sociopolitical discourse. To what degree does film serve both to perpetuate and to contest institutional power structures and administrative practices inherited from the colonial period, as well as deeply ingrained modes of imagining racial and ethnic difference as part of or in contradistinction to French national identity? How have the general public and critics responded to these conflicting representations, and what do those responses tell us about the state of French democracy in the twenty-first century? To what degree does the image of race relations on screen accurately reflect or distort social and political reality, particularly state policy with regard to minorities in fields such as housing, employment, immigration, and incarceration?

To answer these questions, the course will juxtapose various genres (commercial melodramas and comedies vs. non-commercial documentaries and docu-dramas); perspectives (films by Sub-Saharan African and North-African directors vs. white French directors); themes relevant to different demographic groups (legal and clandestine migration from Africa and other parts of the world to France); the hybrid cultural identities of Muslims born in France with family ties to the Maghreb; the role that gender and class play in relation to race and ethnicity.

View printable course flyer

FRIT F671: Advanced French Syntax (3 cr.)
Barbara Vance

NumberDaysTimeRoom
31169TR11:15-12:30GA 0011

This course continues the investigation of the structure of French begun in F577 and culminates in a guided personal research project on an aspect of French syntax selected by the student. We will spend the first 6 weeks reviewing and expanding topics treated in F577, then focus on contemporary literature supporting the research projects.

FRIT F810: Individual Readings in French and Francophone Civilization (1-6 cr.)
Massimo Scalabrini

NumberDay/Time
9193Arranged

Independent study of a topic in French or Francophone culture/civilization not offered in a regular course this semester, under the guidance of a faculty member. Requires departmental authorization. Consult with the professor you would like to work with, and then obtain permission form from the department office.

FRIT F815: Individual Readings in French Literature and Linguistics (1-6 cr.)
Massimo Scalabrini

NumberDay/Time
6046Arranged

Independent study of a topic not offered in a regular course this semester, under the guidance of a faculty member. Consult with the professor you would like to work with, and then fill out the permission form and return it to the office in GISB 3169.

FRIT F875: Research in French Literature and Language (1-12 cr.)
Massimo Scalabrini

NumberDay/TimeNotes
6047ArrangedOn-campus
9196ArrangedOff-campus

Obtain online permission from the Graduate Student Services Coordinator.

FRIT G901: Advanced Research (French) (6 cr.)
Massimo Scalabrini

NumberDay/Time
6048Arranged

Obtain online permission from the Director of Graduate Studies.

Italian Courses

FRIT M505: Modern Italian Literature & Culture (3-4 cr.)
Exile and Estrangement in Italian Culture
Andrea Ciccarelli

NumberDaysTimeRoomNotes
31180
31299
W4:00-6:00HU 1113 cr.
*4 cr.

Italian literature and exile are inextricably intertwined. The new literary tradition in “volgare” spread throughout the Italian peninsula also (if not mostly) as a result of the peregrination of the former poets of the Sicilian School, after the collapse of the Swabian house. Within a few decades from this central event, Dante writes, in exile and because of his exile, the major work of Italian literature. From that moment on, the historical division of the Italian territories until WWI fosters a literary tradition that is almost always “out of place.” This tradition, in modern and contemporary times, has been revived by migratory trends, to and from Italy, and has found its development in Italy as well as abroad.

In this course we will study literary works, essays, and films that relate to the topic of exile, focusing mostly on modern times. We will discuss how the various circumstances behind exile (forced by political conditions or by voluntary migration) play a role in the literary or cinematic works that we will examine. After reflecting on Dante’s experience and lesson, we will then focus mostly on modern authors –writers, scholars, filmmakers, and artists— who deal with the issue in their lives and works. Amongst others, we will analyze/ view works from Italian-born as well as from non-Italian authors, as well as works written or filmed in or outside Italy, in languages other than Italian.

*The 4-credit section of this course is for students who wish to practice their writing skills further. If you are interested in this option, please contact the professor at aciccare@indiana.edu and ask him to send a request for online permission, on your behalf, to departmental staff at fritgs@indiana.edu. The staff will then put a permission online for the student to add the 4-credit section, and will inform the student when this is done.

FRIT M603: Seminar in Medieval Italian Literature (3-4 cr.)
Fra Dante e Boccaccio
Joint listed with MEST-M 502 (class 17107)
Wayne Storey

NumberDaysTimeRoomNotes
31184
31186
R4:00-6:00GA 2134 3 cr.
*4 cr.

Between Dante’s first exchange of poems with Guido Cavalcanti and Dante da Maiano (1283) and Boccaccio’s public lectures on Dante’s Commedia at the Badia di santo Stefano in Florence (1373), the political landscape and literary cultures of Italy change dramatically. If Dante represents the height of Scholasticism at a time of political crises of the State and the Church throughout the peninsula, the economic and political upheaval of the 1340s and 1350s are countered by the birth of proto-humanist interests best represented by the changes in the tastes of Boccaccio himself in the Genealogie. This seminar traces the cultural and historical movements represented by Dante and Boccaccio from the composition and early reception of the Vita Nova and the Commedia to Boccaccio’s Esposizioni (all on the reading lists) as pivotal moments in the literary and cultural history of Italy.

*The 4-credit section of this course is for students who wish to practice their writing skills further. If you are interested in this option, please contact the professor at hstorey@indiana.edu and ask him to send a request for online permission, on your behalf, to departmental staff at fritgs@indiana.edu. The staff will then put a permission online for the student to add the 4-credit section, and will inform the student when this is done.

FRIT M815: Individual Readings in Italian Literature (1-6 cr.)
Massimo Scalabrini

NumberDay/Time
6068Arranged

Independent study of a topic not offered in a regular course this semester, under the guidance of a faculty member. Consult with the professor you would like to work with, and then fill out the permission form and return it to the office in GISB 3169.

FRIT M875: Research in Italian Literature (1-12 cr.)
Massimo Scalabrini

NumberDay/TimeNotes
6069ArrangedOn-campus
9197ArrangedOff-campus

Obtain online permission from the Graduate Student Services Coordinator.

FRIT G901: Advanced Research (Italian) (6 cr.)
Massimo Scalabrini

NumberDay/Time
6049Arranged

Obtain online permission from the Director of Graduate Studies.



Summer 2017

First Six-Week Session
Tuesday, May 9–Friday, June 16

FRIT F491: Elementary French for Graduate Students (3-4 credits)

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructorNotes
4178MTWRF11:00-12:15BH 209Jessica Tindiraundergraduate students (4 cr.)
4179MTWRF11:00-12:15BH 209Jessica Tindiragraduate students (3 cr.)

The course provides an introduction to structures of the language necessary for reading, followed by reading in graded texts of a general nature. Credit given for only one of F491 or any French course at the 100-level.

FRIT F815: Individual Readings in French Literature and Linguistics (1-6 cr.)

NumberDay/TimeNotes
4184ArrangedOn-campus
13121ArrangedOff-campus*

*Obtain online permission from the Graduate Student Services Coordinator.

Independent study of a topic not offered in a regular course, under the guidance of a faculty member. Requires departmental authorization. Consult with the professor you would like to work with, and then complete the permission form and bring it to the office in GISB 3169.

FRIT F875: Research in French Literature and Language (1-12 cr.)

NumberDay/TimeNotes
4186ArrangedOn-campus
5596ArrangedOff-campus*

*Obtain online permission from the Graduate Student Services Coordinator.

FRIT M815: Individual Readings in Italian Literature (1-6 cr.)

NumberDay/TimeNotes
4190ArrangedOn-Campus
8859ArrangedOff-Campus*

*Obtain online permission from the Graduate Student Services Coordinator.

Independent study of a topic not offered in a regular course, under the guidance of a faculty member. Requires departmental authorization. Consult with the professor you would like to work with, and then complete the permission form and bring it to the office in GISB 3169.

FRIT M875: Research in Italian Literature (1-12 cr.)

NumberDay/TimeNotes
4192ArrangedOn-campus
5598ArrangedOff-campus*

*Obtain online permission from the Graduate Student Services Coordinator.

Second Six-Week Session
Monday, June 19–Friday, July 28

FRIT F492: Reading French for Graduate Students (3-4 credits)

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructorNotes
4180MTWRF11:00-12:15BH 209Renata Uzzellundergraduate section (4 cr.)
4181MTWRF11:00-12:15BH 209Renata Uzzellgraduate section (3 cr.)

Prerequisite: F491 or consent of department. Continuation of language and reading development from F491. Credit given for only one of F492, F150, or F200.

FRIT F815: Individual Readings in French Literature and Linguistics (1-6 cr.)

NumberDay/TimeNotes
4185ArrangedOn-campus
13122ArrangedOff-campus*

*Obtain online permission from the Graduate Services Coordinator.

Independent study of a topic not offered in a regular course, under the guidance of a faculty member. Requires departmental authorization. Consult with the professor you would like to work with, and then complete the permission form and bring it to the office in GISB 3169.

FRIT F875: Research in French Literature and Language (1-12 cr.)

NumberDay/TimeNotes
4187ArrangedOn-campus
5597ArrangedOff-campus*

*Obtain online permission from the Graduate Services Coordinator.

FRIT M815: Individual Readings in Italian Literature (1-6 cr.)

NumberDay/TimeNotes
4191ArrangedOn-campus
8860ArrangedOff-campus*

*Obtain online permission from the Graduate Services Coordinator.

Independent study of a topic not offered in a regular course, under the guidance of a faculty member. Requires departmental authorization. Consult with the professor you would like to work with, and then complete the permission form and bring it to the office in GISB 3169.

FRIT M875: Research in Italian Literature (1-12 cr.)

NumberDay/TimeNotes
4193ArrangedOn-campus
5599ArrangedOff-campus*

*Obtain online permission from the Graduate Services Coordinator.



Fall 2017

French Courses

FRIT F491: Elementary French for Graduate Students (3-4 cr.)

NumberDaysTimeRoom
2333 (undergrad 4 cr.)
2334 (grad 3 cr.)
TR7:15-8:45 pmGA 003

The course provides an introduction to structures of the language necessary for reading, followed by reading in graded texts of a general nature. Credit given for only one of F491 or any French course at the 100-level.

FRIT F564: Issues in Literary Theory (3 cr.)
What Can Literature Do?
Oana Panaïté

NumberDaysTimeRoom
30526R4:00-6:00BH 141

The course will examine concepts and theories pertaining to the cultural and political definition of literature. What is literature? What is the literary canon? What roles do authors, critics and common readers play in the making of literature? What is the moral and political responsibility of the writer? What is the place of literature among the arts, and in today's world? What are the material, aesthetic, and moral borders and boundaries of literature? Each session will address a major moment in the history of literary thought from Plato, Aristotle, Rousseau, Kant, Lessing, and Hegel to Sartre, Jameson, Barthes, Derrida, Spivak, Cixous, Rancière, Moretti, Chakrabarty, and Felski.

Readings provided via Canvas. Recommended books: Aristote, Poétique ; Kant, Critique de la faculté de juger ; Derrida, La Dissémination; Cixous, Entre l'écriture.

FRIT F572: Practicum - College French Teaching (1 cr.)
Kate Bastin

NumberDaysTimeRoom
2337F10:10-11:00WH 205

Graded on a pass/fail basis.
Focused classroom observations followed by discussions; identification and evaluation of teaching techniques. Required of new associate instructors of French.

FRIT F576: Introduction to French Phonology (3 cr.)
Barbara Vance

NumberDaysTimeRoom
30532MW4:00-5:15GA 3170

F576 introduces French phonology from a generative perspective, exploring the major controversies of 20th century phonological analysis and their evolution into current models. We will examine, from a problem-solving perspective, such well-known French sound-system phenomena as latent final consonants, e ‘muet’, nasal vowels, and h-aspiré, as well as prosodic structure.

FRIT F580: Applied French Linguistics (3 cr.)
Kevin Rottet

NumberDaysTimeRoom
30533TR9:30-10:45SY 200

Applied Linguistics is the field of study which seeks to apply findings from core areas of linguistics to real-world issues. Our focus will be the application of selected topics in linguistics to the pedagogy of French as a foreign language in the United States. Inter alia, we will draw on a sociolinguistically-oriented survey of the linguistic situation in various Francophone regions of the world, exploring aspects of variability in French, including social, stylistic, and geographical variation, and implications of such variability for the FLE (français langue étrangère) classroom. Our examination of French as found in multiple settings will include an exploration of what it means to be a native speaker, and how and why the construct has been problematized in the applied linguistic literature; the contentious literature on learning a second language in an immersion program, and why scholars have taken such polarized views on the success of its outcomes; issues of language policy in France and the Francophone world; and questions about the selection and development of language norms and pedagogical norms.

FRIT F630: Studies in 17th Century French Literature (3 cr.)
The Early Modern Crisis of Exemplarity
Hall Bjornstad

NumberDaysTimeRoom
33469T4:00-6:00AC C101

From Montaigne ("Tout exemple cloche") to Pascal ("L'exemple nous instruit peu"), via Corneille ("L'exemple souvent n'est qu'un miroir trompeur"), Racine ("Adieu. Servons tous trois d'exemple à l'univers") and Mme de La Fayette ("Elle… laissa des exemples de vertu inimitables"), early modern French literature revolves around examples and their exemplarity. This course will explore the working of exemplarity in central early modern philosophical, literary, pedagogical and political texts by the authors quoted above and others, focusing on the following questions: What is exemplarity? How does an event, an action, a hero, or a king become exemplary? How is exemplarity produced and naturalized, manipulated and problematized in early modern French texts? What is the link between exemplarity, authority and textual truth? To what extent can we speak of an early modern crisis of exemplarity? Secondary readings will include texts by Giorgio Agamben, Timothy Hampton, Reinhart Koselleck, John D. Lyons, Louis Marin, and Hélène Merlin-Kajman. Weekly response papers and scaffolded final research project. All readings in French (English translations available for most texts). Seminar conducted in English.

FRIT F651: Seminar in French Literature (3 cr.)
Topic: Race, Ethnicity and Power in French Cinema and Society
Brett Bowles

NumberDaysTimeRoom
33723T7:00-9:00pmGA 0013

Taking an interdisciplinary perspective from postcolonial studies and film studies, this course will examine the representation of race and ethnicity in French cinema as a contested field of cultural production and of sociopolitical discourse. To what degree do film and other audio-visual mass media (television, internet, social media) serve both to reify and to contest institutional power structures and administrative practices inherited from the colonial period, as well as deeply ingrained modes of imagining racial and ethnic difference as part of or in contradistinction to French national identity?

How have the general public and critics responded to these conflicting representations, and what do those responses tell us about the state of French democracy in the twenty-first century? To what degree does the image of race relations on screen distort social and political reality, particularly state policy with regard to minorities in fields such as housing, employment, immigration, and incarceration? Does French cinema by white metropolitan directors express nostalgia for the colonial period?

To answer these questions, the course will juxtapose various genres (commercial melodramas and comedies vs. non-commercial documentaries and docu-dramas); perspectives (films by Sub-Saharan African and North-African directors vs. white French directors); themes relevant to different demographic groups (legal and clandestine migration from Africa and other parts of the world to France; the hybrid cultural identities of Muslims born in France with family ties to the Maghreb; the role that gender and class play in relation to race and ethnicity).

FRIT F672: French Dialectology (1 cr)
Julie Auger

NumberDaysTimeRoom
30534TR4:00-5:15AC C103

Ce cours s’intéresse à la variation géographique et sociale en français. Après un bref rappel de l’histoire de cette langue et une description de la situation linguistique en France contemporaine, le cours sera divisé en deux grandes parties: dialectologie et sociolinguistique. On y discute les méthodes de la dialectologie traditionnelle et l’élaboration des atlas linguistiques, on compare ces méthodes avec celles de la dialectologie moderne et on y présente les principaux dialectes d’oïl. Nous traversons ensuite l’Atlantique pour voir comment le français hexagonal et les dialectes d’oïl se sont à la fois conservés et transformés. Finalement, nous verrons comment le besoin d’étudier la variation en milieu urbain a donné naissance à la sociolinguistique. Les questions de norme, de variation sociale, de types de français y sont abordées et exemplifiées à l’aide d’études variationnistes sur des phénomènes linguistiques précis

FRIT F815: Individual Readings in French Literature and Linguistics (1-6 cr.)
Massimo Scalabrini

NumberDay/Time
2338Arranged

Independent study of a topic not offered in a regular course this semester, under the guidance of a faculty member. Consult with the professor you would like to work with, and then fill out the permission form and return it to the office in GISB 3169.

FRIT F875: Research in French Literature and Language (1-12 cr.)
Massimo Scalabrini

NumberDay/TimeNotes
2339ArrangedOn-campus
5621Arranged*Off-campus

*Obtain online permission from the Graduate Student Services Coordinator.

FRIT G901: Advanced Research (French) (6 cr.)
Massimo Scalabrini

NumberDay/Time
2340Arranged

Obtain online permission from the Director of Graduate Studies.

Italian Courses

FRIT M500: Seminar in italian Cinema (3-4 cr.)
Italian Style Comedy from Fascism to the Present
Antonio Vitti

NumberDaysTimeRoomNotes
30560 T4:00-6:00WH 1083 cr.
4 cr.

The goal of this course is to study the most relevant and representative Italian film comedies from the Fascist period to the seventies. We will discuss whether this films constitute a genre or a movement. We will start by discussing Italian cinematic comedy before the advent of Commedia all’italiana -In the wake of postwar cinema a new genre emerged that lasted from the late 1950s to the mid-1970s: La commedia all’italiana , influenced by the Neo-realist movement, continued social critique by combining it with comic techniques. From this new style a series of directors managed to satirize the Italy of the economic boom by presenting it as a “Miracolo economico all’italiana” in a genuinely popular form of cinema. In this course we will look at the emergence of this genre, its key works, and compare and contrast the way in which different directors developed the unique features of the commedia. We will also examine the relationship between cinematic creation, social issues and the historical conditions that gave rise to the popularity of this particular form of comedy and shaped its development. We will look at how Italian comedy films evolved in the 1990s to the present.

FRIT M572: Italian Teaching Practicum (1 cr.)
Karolina Serafin

NumberDayTimeRoom
6481T1:00-2:15pmGA 3170

Graded on a pass/fail basis.

Focused classroom observations followed by discussions; identification and evaluation of teaching techniques. Required of new associate instructors; offered only in fall semester.

FRIT M573: Methods in italian Language Teaching (3 cr.)
Colleen Ryan

NumberDaysTimeRoomNotes
30561R3:35-5:30BH 106

In this course we will explore foreign language teaching and learning from a variety of theoretical and practical perspectives that inform our daily decisions about effective methodologies for fostering second language acquisition. Students will read and discuss a variety of materials pertaining to all L2 skill areas and cultural proficiency. Additional components of this course include teaching for creative and critical thinking, multiple intelligences theory, second language acquisition research methods, an introduction to teaching literature, expertise in teaching, performative aspects of teaching and learning, ongoing professional development and the creation of a formal teaching dossier. Assignments range from short critical commentaries, discussion questions, annotated bibliographies, and collaborative presentations, to an oral exam and final teaching dossier materials.

FRIT M604: Seminar in Renaissance Italian Literature (3 cr.)
Ariosto & Folengo
Joint offered
Massimo Scalabrini

NumberDaysTimeRoomNotes
30562 (3 cr.)
32795 (4 cr.*)
M4:00-6:00BH 217 #30562 is joint-offered

*Permission required to take class #32795 for 4 credits!

Ariosto e Folengo concepiscono e compongono l’Orlando furioso e il Baldus nello stesso giro d’anni (i primi cinque decenni del Cinquecento) e nella stessa area culturale padana che ha in Ferrara e Mantova due fra i più vitali centri di irradiazione. Nonostante tali affinità, le soluzioni stilistiche e le figure antropologiche da essi elaborate risultano profondamente diverse, fino a culminare, in un caso, nel capolavoro riconosciuto del cosiddetto “classicismo rinascimentale” e, nell’altro, nel testo forse più straordinario della cosiddetta “letteratura irregolare”. Leggeremo in maniera ravvicinata e comparata il Furioso (del 1532; edizione principe 1516) e il Baldus (nella redazione, postuma, del 1552; edizione principe 1517), mettendoli al vaglio della critica e confrontandoli ad altre opere ariostesche e folenghiane. Il corso si terrà in italiano.

FRIT M815: Individual Readings in Italian Literature (1-6 cr.)
Massimo Scalabrini

NumberDay/Time
2357Arranged

Independent study of a topic not offered in a regular course this semester, under the guidance of a faculty member. Consult with the professor you would like to work with, and then fill out the permission form and return it to the office in GISB 3169.

FRIT M875: Research in Italian Literature (1-12 cr.)
Massimo Scalabrini

NumberDay/TimeNotes
2358ArrangedOn-campus
5622ArrangedOff-campus

Obtain online permission from the Graduate Student Services Coordinator.

FRIT G901: Advanced Research (Italian) (6 cr.)
Massimo Scalabrini

NumberDay/Time
2341Arranged

Obtain online permission from the Director of Graduate Studies.

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